Grizzly Creek fire update

Coffee Pot Road to re-open Saturday; Crews continue suppression repair

EAGLE, Colo. – The Bureau of Land Management and the White River National Forest will re-open the Coffee Pot Road beginning Saturday, Sept. 12 and are asking the public to recreate in the area responsibly.

“We understand the high public interest in accessing the Coffee Pot Road. We still have crews working in the area, so we are asking people to drive carefully, and if they are hunting, to be aware of their surroundings,” said
White River National Forest Supervisor Scott Fitzwilliams.

“Be mindful in doing your part to minimize road damage as you drive onto open side roads north of Coffee Pot Road,” said BLM Colorado River Valley Field Manager Larry Sandoval. “If your vehicle begins to cause ruts, please consider other access options, and know that repaired fire suppression lines are not open to motorized travel.”

The BLM and Forest closures that include the area south of Coffee Pot Road are still in place. A map of the closures is available on Inciweb: inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/.

The BLM boat launch at Dotsero Landing will also open Saturday for take-out only. Lyon’s Gulch and Cottonwood Landing above Dotsero remain open for put-in and take-out. The Colorado River recreation areas from Dotsero through Glenwood Canyon to No Name remain closed.

The Transfer Trail Road closure will continue because of the high amount of heavy equipment still working in the area.

The Grizzly Creek Fire remains 32,431 acres (a small reduction this week due to mapping) and 91 percent contained. About 100 personnel remain on the fire, monitoring the open containment lines and continuing suppression repair as roads dry to allow better access.

Rain and snow have helped reduce fire activity. Firefighters are awaiting an infrared flight that will show where any heat may remain after this week’s precipitation.

Meanwhile, the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) Team is continuing its assessment of the fire. The BLM Colorado River Valley Field Office and the White River National Forest remain under Stage 2 fire restrictions, which prohibit all campfires and charcoal, even in developed areas. For more information, go to www.blm.gov or www.fs.usda.gov/whiteriver.

Closure order-|

Closure order map-|

Forest Order-|

Grizzly Creek fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Start Date: 08/10/2020     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human                                         
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 91%
Total Personnel: 383

Facebook Live Community Meeting tonight at 6 p.m. Tune in to www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO for updates and a live Q&A with the Alaska IMT, the Type 3 Upper Colorado River Fire Management Organization, the incoming Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) Team, local officials and cooperating agencies.

(EAGLE, Colo.) – The Upper Colorado River Fire Type 3 Organization will assume command of the fire on Wednesday, after shadowing the Alaska Incident Management Team today. The teams are working closely with
management agencies to ensure a smooth transition as priorities shift from suppression to suppression repair.

The Type 3 Organization will be working cooperatively with the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) Team. BAER Teams, composed of resource specialists, are brought in to determine the need for, prescribe and, if necessary, implement emergency treatments to stabilize burned areas and watersheds.

Containment reached 91% as the southern perimeter of the fire in Devil’s Hole Creek drainage was completed. Crews have been patrolling this section of line for days, cold-trailing and checking for heat. Temperatures are expected to peak around 50 degrees this morning as the cold front pushes in from the north, with showers beginning as early as sunrise. Temperatures are slated to fall steadily throughout the day, reaching
the 30s by early evening. Rain will turn to snow as forecast temperatures drop below freezing overnight, with accumulations from 2 to 6 inches, and higher amounts expected over 10,000 feet.

Safety Officer Mike Bradley urged firefighters to exercise caution as the freezing rain and snow will make for dangerous driving conditions around the fire. Wintry storms and the attendant slippery roads and poor visibility
are expected to continue into Wednesday and taper off.

Suppression repair continues around the fire, with excavators, dozers and hand crews working to return the fireline to a more natural state. Inclement weather is expected to slow progress.

The number of personnel working on the fire has dropped to 383. There are six crews, one helicopter, 21 engines, six excavators, five dozers, three water tenders and one skidgine still working on the fire.

Fire closure areas have been reduced by the White River National Forest and Colorado River Valley BLM office. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads remain closed. Both closure orders and associated maps can be found here.

Interstate 70 remains open to two-way traffic. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) remains in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details

Fire information/media line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov
inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/
https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Start Date: 08/10/2020     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human                                         
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 83%
Total Personnel: 439

(EAGLE, Colo.) – As forecast, patches of the Grizzly Creek Fire perked up in the hotter, drier weather. Visible smoke popped up on both sides of Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon on Saturday, as unburned pockets of vegetation occasionally ignited, producing small columns of smoke that attracted firefighter and public attention. 

The smoke prompted a few calls to the Grand Junction Interagency Wildland Fire Dispatch Center but the fretting was unwarranted. Most of the hot spots were well within the fire perimeter, surrounded by black and well inside the control line, posing no threat. Some spots are impossible for firefighters to reach and have been smoldering for days. Water drops from helicopters were used to douse flare-ups in these inaccessible areas. 

Similar fire behavior and critical fire weather is expected today. Temperatures will climb into the mid 90s, relative humidities could drop into the single digits and 20-25 mph wind gusts are expected to blow out of the west. The forecast prompted the National Weather Service in Grand Junction to issue a Red Flag Warning on Monday from noon to 9 p.m. 

Despite the hot, dry conditions the past few days, there has been little change in the fire perimeter. Fire size remains at 32,464 acres for the 7th day in a row and estimated containment is 83%. 

The primary culprits putting up smoke on Saturday – and likely today, too – were the No Name Creek drainage on the north side of the highway near Mile 124 and the Ike Creek drainage south of the interstate near Mile 129. Interior smokes like these are expected to continue until a season-ending rain or snow event, which could be on the horizon early next week. Temperatures are forecast to drop dramatically on Tuesday and below freezing by Wednesday with a chance of rain mixed with snow. 

Noting the extreme weather forecast, Deputy Incident Commander Tom Kurth with the Alaska Type 1 Incident Management Team said the strategy is “to hold fast as critical conditions prevail while anticipating the rapidly deteriorating conditions predicted on Tuesday.”   

Repair of the 61 miles of dozer lines built early in the fire continues to chug along. Heavy equipment operators have completed 50 miles of repair, with 11 miles remaining. Today, they will turn their iron and attention to restoring the Transfer Trail Road on the north end of the fire, the last section of line needing repair. 

Fire managers with the Alaska IMT continue prepping for a transition to a smaller Type 3 team. The number of personnel has dropped to 439. The tactical line-up is down to six crews, four helicopters and 28 engines and will continue to shrink.  

Fire closure areas have been reduced by the White River National Forest and Colorado River Valley BLM office. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads remain closed. Both closure orders and associated maps can be found here.

Interstate 70 remains open to two-way traffic. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) remains in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details. 

Fire information/media line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov
inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/
https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 83%
Total Personnel: 548

(EAGLE, Colo.) – As predicted, warmer, drier conditions prevailed over the Grizzly Creek Fire, a trend that is forecast to continue and peak on Saturday with temperatures climbing to 90 degrees. However, control lines continued to hold strong on Thursday, as firefighters labored to build more containment line and strengthen existing line.

There was no change in acreage burned for the fifth day in a row while estimated containment climbed a single percent to 83%. Of the 78.5 miles of containment line around the fire, approximately 65 miles have been secured. Much of the remaining uncontained line will stay that way because it is too dangerous for firefighters to access.

“We’re on track to have suppression operations completed by Sunday,” reported Karen Scholl, operations planning chief for the Alaska Incident Management Team, which has command of the fire.

Even with temperatures in the mid 80s and relative humidities dipping into the 20% range, the fire showed little sign of life Thursday. A few visible smokes popped up behind Bair Ranch on the southeast side, as well as in the Grizzly and No Name creek drainages on the northwest corner. The heat in both areas was addressed with helicopter water drops. Interior portions of the fire will continue to put up random smokes until a season-ending rain or snow event.

With fire activity at a minimum, the main focus now is on repairing dozer lines constructed during initial and extended attack, commonly referred to as “suppression repair.” There are six excavators and six dozers tackling line rehab. So far, 31 miles of line have been repaired and there are another 7.5 miles pending. There are another 27.5 miles of potential line that are being assessed. Most suppression repair should be complete this weekend, with the exception of Transfer Trail Road. That last piece will take at least another week of work, Scholl said.

The hot, dry conditions will continue through the holiday weekend before a drastic change in the weather early next week. Forecasters are calling for sub-freezing temperatures and possible snow by Wednesday night as a cold front moves into the area late Monday. However, given the weekend forecast, fire managers say it is imperative that hunters, campers and others celebrating the holiday weekend be extremely careful with any activity that could spark a wildfire. A statewide fire ban remains in effect because of the tinder dry conditions in much of Colorado.

Fire closure areas were reduced on Thursday by the White River National Forest and BLM Colorado River Valley office. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads remain closed, as well as areas of the Flat Tops Wilderness accessed by those roads. A new closure order and map for both agencies can be found on the White River NF website. For public and firefighter safety, motorists, recreationalists and hunters are asked to adhere to the closures.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 82%
Total Personnel: 603

Facebook Live Community Meetng tonight at 6 p.m. Tune in to https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO for updates and a live Q&A with the Alaska IMT, local officials and cooperating agencies.

(EAGLE, Colo.) – With no fire growth for the fourth straight day, the Alaska Type 1 Incident Management Team began mapping out a downward glide path for the Grizzly Creek Fire on Wednesday. Fire managers conferred with officials from the White River National Forest, Bureau of Land Management and Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control to determine future management plans for the 32,464-acre fire. The Alaska IMT is set to transfer command of the fire in five days and agencies representatives must decide whether to call in a Type 2 IMT or a smaller Type 3 team.

“This will help us get direction on what kind of end state agency administrators want when we leave here,” Alaska IMT Incident Commander Norm McDonald said of Wednesday night strategic analysis.
Containment on the fire reached 82% on Wednesday, an increase of 7%. For the fourth straight day, there was no increase in acreage. Crews have now secured approximately 64.5 of the 78.5-mile fire perimeter.

With warmer, drier conditions, the fire showed a slight pulse on Wednesday with a few visible, early-morning smokes in the French Creek drainage on the north side. The smoke was the result of pockets of isolated, unburned patches of conifers burning up on the interior of the fire. The hot spots were ¼ to ½ mile inside the perimeter and posed no threat.

“It’s a good indicator of what we’ll be seeing over the next four or five days,” Alaska IMT Operations Chief Jon Glover said, alluding to a warming, drying trend that is expected to spawn interior flare-ups of unburned fuel the next few days.

The increased containment – or black line – is the result of three hotshot crews finally securing a piece of rugged, stubborn line in the No Name Creek drainage north of Glenwood Springs that they have been toiling on for the past week. Another hotshot crew closed up a small chunk of open line in the Cinnamon Creek drainage on the south end of the fire. Elsewhere on the fire, crews continue mopping up secured fireline while heavy equipment is being used to repair and restore dozer lines carved out during initial and direct attack.

A large portion of the White River National Forest remains closed, as do some BLM and State of Colorado lands. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads, as well as areas of the Flat Tops Wilderness accessed by those roads are closed. For public and firefighter safety, motorists, recreationalists and hunters are asked to adhere to the closures. For maps and closure info, go to White River NF closure area or BLM closure order and closure map.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Start Date: 08/10/2020
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 75%
Total Personnel: 567

(EAGLE, Colo.) – Firefighters capitalized on a soaking, overnight rainfall as they continued to tame the Grizzly Creek Fire on Tuesday. Nearly one-quarter of an inch of rain fell over the fire area over the course of several hours late Monday and early Tuesday. That will benefit firefighters working to subdue two pieces of active, stubborn fireline, as well as mop up the more passive sections of line.

“A slow, steady rain does a really good job of penetrating the fuels,” said fire behavior analyst Chris Moore with the Alaska Incident Management Team that has command of the fire. “If you get one big dump of rain it runs off before it can be absorbed. This type of rain does a lot beter for moistening those fuels.”

For the third day in a row, the fire showed no growth or increase in acreage. It remains at 32,464 acres and 75% containment. Firefighters have secured roughly 58 miles of the 78.5 miles of fire perimeter.

With the operational campaign switching over to mop up and suppression repair, fire managers remind hunters and recreationalists that a road and trail closure remains in place across much of the White River National Forest and on select BLM lands. There have been several instances recently where firefighters have encountered mountain bikers in closure areas. This creates a dangerous situation for firefighters, heavy equipment operators and mountain bikers on the narrow, twisty trails and roads in the Coffee Pot Road, Cottonwood Pass and Red Canyon areas.

“There are hundreds of miles of trails that remain open to mountain biking outside the closure area,” noted Alaska IMT Incident Commander Norm McDonald. “Out of respect for firefighter and public safety, we ask mountain bikers to adhere to the closures. The last thing we want is a surprise encounter between a mountain biker and a piece of heavy equipment.” For maps and closure info, go to White River NF closure area or BLM closure order and closure map.

Meanwhile, firefighters continue to focus their energy in the usual areas – a roughly 9-mile piece of uncontained line in the No Name and Grizzly creek drainages on the northwest corner of the fire north of Glenwood Springs and about 10 miles of open line in the Cinnamon and Devil’s Hole drainages on the south end of the fire. Infrared flights by drone and aircra? have confirmed those are the two areas of concern, according to fire managers.

As containment goes up, the number of personnel shrinks. There are 567 personnel s?ll working on the fire. That number has dropped by 239 in the last week. There are 11 crews, 4 helicopters and 26 engines s?ll in the tac?cal line-up, plus a cadre of heavy equipment that includes 7 excavators, 5 dozers, 2 skidgines and 1 chipper. Suppression repair is nearly complete on dozer lines north of Coffee Pot Road and is ongoing around Bair Ranch and Red Canyon.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Fire Information/Media Line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov

inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/ htps://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO @fire_grizzly

Grizzly Creek Fire update

GCSO: Most pre-evacuation orders lifted in the Grizzly Creek Fire area

Garfield County Sheriff’s Office – Effective at noon today and in collaboration with the Incident Command Team (Alaska Team Incident Management) the evacuation and pre-evacuation orders on the Grizzly Creek Fire have been lifted for all of Lookout Mountain, Spring Valley Ranch, High Aspen, Homestead Estates, Coulter Meadows, Bair Ranch and Crystal River Ranch residents.

Pre-evacuation orders are still in place for the residents of No Name, due primarily to weather concerns for a potential debris flow and associated flooding that might occur.

All road closures have been lifted except for the Coffee Pot Springs Road. This is an area closure by the Forest Service and applies to all motorized vehicles including motorcycles and dirt bikes as well as pedestrians. Any one not associated with the Incident Management Team or who is not a first responder found in this area, will be subject to appropriate fines and immediate removal.

This is still an active fire with only 75% containment. There are 589 people being directed by the Incident Management Team to combat this fire. This requires not only a large number of ground personnel, but also the movement of equipment into and out of the area.

Everyone is asked to respect this area closure for the safety of themselves and the men and women combating the Grizzly Creek Fire.

GCSO: Most pre-evacuation orders lifted in the Grizzly Creek Fire area

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 75%
Total Personnel: 589

(EAGLE, Colo.) – Strong afternoon wind gusts swept over the Grizzly Creek Fire area for the second day in a row and once again control lines held. Despite wind gusts measured at more than 40 mph over parts of the fire, there was no increase in acreage while containment bumped up to an estimated 75%.

The strongest winds were between 8,000 – 11,000 feet, according to Incident Meteorologist Nathan Heinert. Winds at lower elevations and in valleys weren’t quite as strong. “A lot of the fire was protected, which is a good thing,” he said.

That containment lines rose to the challenge two days in a row validates all the hard work and long hours that hundreds of firefighters have put in the past 3 ½ weeks. Sixty of the approximately 80 miles of fire perimeter are now contained.

Mother Nature provided a helping hand Monday night with a steady rain that dropped two-tenths of an inch of rain over most of the fire area. Fortunately, the rain wasn’t heavy enough to prompt any concerns about runoff or flash floods, said Heinert.

Operational focus on Monday remained on uncontained line in the No Name and Grizzly Creek drainages. Three hotshot crews succeeded in connecting two pieces of hand line along the southwest of rim of Grizzly Creek and fire managers are hoping to connect that line to No Name Creek today to secure that edge of the fire.

An unmanned aerial system (aka drone) was used to inspect the two drainages on Monday. “They looked really good,” Alaska IMT Operations Section Chief Karen Scholl said. “They weren’t showing much heat at all.”

Suppression repair continues to ramp up and fire managers are hoping to add more heavy equipment to the lineup. There are currently six dozers, six excavators and two chippers working to rehab lines in the areas of Coffee Pot Road, Bair Ranch, Red Canyon and No Name.

The Forest Service announced the fire was human caused at a Facebook Live community meeting held in Eagle on Monday. The investigation into the specific cause will continue.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

Road/trail closures remain in effect for Coffee Pot Road, Transfer Trail Road and areas of the Flattops Wilderness accessed by those roads, as do many surrounding White River National Forest and BLM roads. For maps and closure info, go to White River NF closure area or BLM closure order and closure map.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Fire Information/Media Line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov
inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/ ? https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO ? @fire_grizzly

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire Update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Under investigation
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 73%
Total Personnel: 626

Facebook Live Community Meeting tonight at 6 p.m. Tune in to htps://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO for
updates and a live Q&A with the Alaska Incident Management Team, local officials and cooperating agencies.


(EAGLE, Colo.) – A passing storm that quickly generated wind gusts of 40 mph heightened concern on the fireline
Sunday. Crews were pulled off the line at 2 p.m. due to the sudden turn in the weather.
The hour-long wind event, which threatened to topple fire-weakened trees and was accompanied by lightning, created a
dicey situation for firefighters. Fortunately, no incidents or injuries were reported and firefighters were able to return to
the line about an hour later after the storm passed.
Containment lines held strong, with acreage (32,464 acres) and containment (73%) holding steady. Lines will be
challenged again today as another weather system moves in, bringing with it “near critical fire weather conditions,”
according to Incident Meteorologist Nathan Heinert. Another round of 40 mph wind gusts are forecast, with relative
humidities dropping into the teens, producing drier conditions that could produce flare ups.
“If we get any spottng or flare ups, we’ll have personnel in the appropriate places to take action,” said Operations
Planning Section Chief Karen Scholl with the Alaska Incident Management Team. “We have safety zones for firefighters
identified if we need them.”
Fire managers employed a familiar strategy on Sunday, focusing efforts on an uncontained edge on the fire’s northwest
corner in the No Name and Grizzly Creek drainages, about 10 miles northeast of Glenwood Springs. Three hotshot crews
are working to connect two sections of open line – one working north along No Name Creek and the other two working
back toward them from Grizzly Creek. Elsewhere around the fire, crews continued to seek and destroy hot spots. Crews
are also still trying to secure a rugged, twisty stretch of uncontained line on the south side of the fire near Green Lake.
Crews have secured approximately 60 of the 80 miles of containment line and mop-up operations are ongoing.
Crews, assisted by a growing fleet of heavy equipment, continue rehabilitating lines along Coffee Pot Road north of
Interstate 70. Crews began pulling excess equipment from contained areas to the north and south.
Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for power line and utility repair, firefighting operations and flash
floods in the event of heavy rain.
Road closures remain in effect for Coffee Pot Road, Transfer Trail Road and areas of the Flattops accessed by those
roads, as do many surrounding White River National Forest and BLM roads. Go to www.cotrip.org for info.
A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov.
Fire Information/Media Line: (970) 930-1850 Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov

Grizzly Creek Fire Update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

August 30, 2020 

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Under investigation
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 73%
Total Personnel: 657 

Much of the fire received widespread precipitation Saturday. The steep terrain, combined with a solid wetting rain, created treacherous working conditions on slopes and drainages. Crews were pulled off the line to wait for the rain to pass. Firefighters exercised extreme caution on the slippery roads.  

Cold fronts are forecast through Sunday and Monday, bringing isolated showers and strong winds. Despite the chance for local precipitation, fuels are expected to dry by Monday, which could be a critical fire day with low relative humidities and winds gusting to 37 mph. 

Crews are now working some of the roughest and most inaccessible portions of the fire. Helicopters were required to deliver two additional crews to an uncontained section of the fire perimeter, where they are working on a fireline to connect the Grizzly Creek rim to the No Name Creek rim. These two drainages comprise some of the most dangerous terrain on this fire and continue to present a challenge to firefighters and fire managers. An additional crew will be added today to support this crucial mission.  

Crews are working to strengthen firelines on recently contained parts of the fire, while suppression repair continues on sections of completed fireline that have been mopped up and cold trailed to ensure that there is no residual heat in the area. Resource Advisors, (READs), work closely with fire personnel and heavy equipment, aka “Big Iron,” to repair staging areas, firelines, roads and culverts that have been damage ed by fire suppression activities.  Land managers provide guidance to ensure that sensitive species, their habitats, and other resources with cultural and historical values are protected. 

Interstate 70 remains open to two-way traffic. Motorists should expect delays for utility work and firefighting operations, or in the event of debris flow due to rain. 

Road closures remain in effectfor Coffee Pot Road, Transfer Trail Road and areas of the Flat Top Wilderness accessed by those roads, as do many surrounding White River National Forest and BLM roads. Go to www.cotrip.org

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire to provide a safe operating environment for firefighting aircraft. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov

Fire Information/Media Line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov
inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/
https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO
@fire_grizzly  

Grizzly Creek Fire update