Fire restrictions in Garfield County reduced to stage 1

STAGE I FIRE RESTRICTIONS BEGIN SEPTEMBER 18, 2020

Garfield County, CO – The Garfield County Sheriff, and the seven Fire Districts in Garfield County as well as BLM are moving from Stage 2 Fire Restrictions to Stage 1 Fire Restrictions effective at 12:01 a.m. Friday, September 18, 2020. This applies to all of unincorporated Garfield County.

It was announced yesterday that Forest Service Lands in Garfield County will also reduce their fire restrictions to Stage 1 at the same time.
Fire danger is still high throughout Garfield County, but the recent cooler temperatures and moisture have allowed for a re-evaluation of the restrictions. Local, county, state and federal officials in the area will continue to evaluate and coordinate fire restrictions weekly during the fire season.

WHAT STAGE I FIRE RESTRICTIONS MEAN IN GARFIELD COUNTY
• Fireworks are not allowed under Stage I Fire Restrictions. Professional fireworks shows may be allowed through the permitting process.
• All burn permits are postponed/Canceled until further notice.
• Campfires are only allowed within designated fire grates in Developed Areas (i.e. a permanent in-ground containment structure or store bought fire pit) A temporary fire pan and rock campfire rings will not be acceptable.
• No fires of any type including charcoal in Undeveloped Areas.
107 Eighth Street, Glenwood Springs, CO 81601, 970-945-0453 or 970-945-6430 (fax), www.garcosheriff.com .
• No smoking except within a designated area, enclosed vehicle or building, a developed area or in an area free of combustibles.
• No use of fireworks or explosive materials, including “exploding” targets or bullets and tracer rounds.
• Exercise common sense and industry safety practice when welding or operation of an acetylene or other similar torch with open flame always cleared safe area of vegetation and combustibles.

Penalties
Causing a fire during fire restrictions can be a class 6 felony and can be punishable by fines. Other possible charges include Fourth Degree Arson (M2) and Intentionally Setting a Wildfire (F3). You may also be held financially responsible for damage caused.

Federal lands
The use of fireworks, flares, or other incendiary devices, including exploding targets, are always prohibited on Federal lands.

By definition:
A “developed area” is an area, whether within city limits or rural, that is groomed, manicured and or watered, where grasses, brush and trees are regularly attended to by land owner. This includes residential and business areas, improved recreational areas, parks and other common areas.

“Undeveloped areas” are lands that are not groomed, manicured, or watered, where grasses, brush and trees have been allowed to grow in a natural environment. This includes green belts that are not landscaped or
manicured, open space lands, non-manicured park lands, and other areas where the fire hazard presented by the vegetation is determined by the authority having jurisdiction or designee to be an undue wildland fire hazard.

Fire restrictions in Garfield County reduced to stage 1

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Start Date: 08/10/2020     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human                                         
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 91%
Total Personnel: 383

Facebook Live Community Meeting tonight at 6 p.m. Tune in to www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO for updates and a live Q&A with the Alaska IMT, the Type 3 Upper Colorado River Fire Management Organization, the incoming Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) Team, local officials and cooperating agencies.

(EAGLE, Colo.) – The Upper Colorado River Fire Type 3 Organization will assume command of the fire on Wednesday, after shadowing the Alaska Incident Management Team today. The teams are working closely with
management agencies to ensure a smooth transition as priorities shift from suppression to suppression repair.

The Type 3 Organization will be working cooperatively with the Burned Area Emergency Response (BAER) Team. BAER Teams, composed of resource specialists, are brought in to determine the need for, prescribe and, if necessary, implement emergency treatments to stabilize burned areas and watersheds.

Containment reached 91% as the southern perimeter of the fire in Devil’s Hole Creek drainage was completed. Crews have been patrolling this section of line for days, cold-trailing and checking for heat. Temperatures are expected to peak around 50 degrees this morning as the cold front pushes in from the north, with showers beginning as early as sunrise. Temperatures are slated to fall steadily throughout the day, reaching
the 30s by early evening. Rain will turn to snow as forecast temperatures drop below freezing overnight, with accumulations from 2 to 6 inches, and higher amounts expected over 10,000 feet.

Safety Officer Mike Bradley urged firefighters to exercise caution as the freezing rain and snow will make for dangerous driving conditions around the fire. Wintry storms and the attendant slippery roads and poor visibility
are expected to continue into Wednesday and taper off.

Suppression repair continues around the fire, with excavators, dozers and hand crews working to return the fireline to a more natural state. Inclement weather is expected to slow progress.

The number of personnel working on the fire has dropped to 383. There are six crews, one helicopter, 21 engines, six excavators, five dozers, three water tenders and one skidgine still working on the fire.

Fire closure areas have been reduced by the White River National Forest and Colorado River Valley BLM office. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads remain closed. Both closure orders and associated maps can be found here.

Interstate 70 remains open to two-way traffic. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) remains in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details

Fire information/media line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov
inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/
https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Pine Gulch Fire update


Southern Area Red Team – Mike Dueitt, Incident Commander
Information Center: (970) 628-0130, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.
Media Inquiries: (970) 812-3706, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.

Pine Gulch Fire Statistics:
Size: approximately 139,007 acres
Containment: 87%
Total Personnel: 600
Location: Approximately 18 miles north of Grand Junction, CO
Reported: July 31, approximately 5:15 p.m.
Cause: Lightning

Resources: 1 Type 1 hand crews, 2 Type 2 hand crews, 2 helicopters, 29 engines, 10 bulldozers, 14 water tenders, 5 masticators 6 skidgens and overhead/support personnel

Special Note: With the upcoming holiday weekend, please check and follow current fire restrictions while you are recreating. Mesa County, Garfield County and the Bureau of Land Management are all under Stage 2 Fire Restrictions. See bit.ly/Fire_Restrictions to see what is prohibited and allowed at this stage.

Current Situation: Firefighters continue to monitor, patrol and mop up the Pine Gulch Fire as well as backhaul unneeded equipment. All but four of the 300 water pumps that were used to protect structures threatened by the fire have been removed. Small areas of heat still persist in the northwest side of the fire in Munger Creek and East Salt Creek (Division D/E). Less fire activity was seen in Munger Creek yesterday than on Wednesday. The area of focus for hand crews continues to be mopping up along the southern rim of the East Salt Creek main canyon. Firefighting personnel and equipment are being released as the fire approaches full containment.

Assessing and repairing damage from fire suppression continues throughout the fire perimeter and interior. Good progress is being made with work such as installing water bars on roads, spreading piled up soil/vegetation and mulching cut brush/limbs. Fence repair will continue today in Garby Canyon. Law enforcement officers will escort heavy equipment moving along Highway 139 near Douglas Pass, so motorists may experience delays today. Hand crews are working in tandem with heavy equipment in several sites to help stack brush.

Weather Forecast & Fire Behavior: Mostly clear with high temperatures around 90 at low elevations and in the 80’s at high elevations. Dry, with relative humidity 8 to 14 percent. Winds will mostly be terrain driven, 2-5 mph, with gusts near 20 mph. High Pressure will shift east across the Great Basin and over the Central Rockies this weekend. Expect very dry conditions with poor overnight humidity recoveries today through Sunday. Winds will increase, mainly during afternoon hours when gusts may exceed 25 mph. As a result, an increased potential for critical fire weather conditions exists.

No fire perimeter growth is expected today as smoldering and creeping fire activity will continue within containment lines. Heavy dead and down vegetation remains very dry and will burn despite recent precipitation. Isolated pockets of live and dead vegetation may be visible in the fire’s interior. Surface fire and isolated single tree torching is possible. Firefighters are monitoring these pockets to ensure they pose no threat to containment lines.

Area Closure: A Bureau of Land Management area closure is in effect for lands managed by the agency in the fire area. Areas are closed beyond the following road junctions:

266 Road at Highway 139County Road 200 at County Line21 Road at entrance to Hunter Canyon16 Road at V8/10 RoadCounty (Roan Creek) Road 204 at 209 intersectionEnd of V2/10 Road at BLM closureQ 5/10 Road at 18 Road Garvey Canyon Road

Note: Motorists may encounter delays in the Douglas Pass area of Highway 139 and County Road 256. For more information, please see www.facebook.com/BLMColoradoFire

Open Areas:

County Road 256 east of Douglas Pass Base of Bookcliffs Coal CanyonNorth Fruita Desert, 18 Road, campground and bike trails V 2/10 Road north of the Wild Horse Management Area Mount Garfield hiking trail to foot travel

Emergency Alerts: For Garfield County, please visit garco911.com. Mesa County alerts, please visit bit.ly/Emergency_Alerts.

Temporary Flight Restrictions: A Temporary Flight Restriction is in place over the Pine Gulch Fire. Wildfires are a No Drone Zone. If you fly, we can’t. For more information, visit http://knowbeforeyoufly.org.

Pine Gulch Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 83%
Total Personnel: 548

(EAGLE, Colo.) – As predicted, warmer, drier conditions prevailed over the Grizzly Creek Fire, a trend that is forecast to continue and peak on Saturday with temperatures climbing to 90 degrees. However, control lines continued to hold strong on Thursday, as firefighters labored to build more containment line and strengthen existing line.

There was no change in acreage burned for the fifth day in a row while estimated containment climbed a single percent to 83%. Of the 78.5 miles of containment line around the fire, approximately 65 miles have been secured. Much of the remaining uncontained line will stay that way because it is too dangerous for firefighters to access.

“We’re on track to have suppression operations completed by Sunday,” reported Karen Scholl, operations planning chief for the Alaska Incident Management Team, which has command of the fire.

Even with temperatures in the mid 80s and relative humidities dipping into the 20% range, the fire showed little sign of life Thursday. A few visible smokes popped up behind Bair Ranch on the southeast side, as well as in the Grizzly and No Name creek drainages on the northwest corner. The heat in both areas was addressed with helicopter water drops. Interior portions of the fire will continue to put up random smokes until a season-ending rain or snow event.

With fire activity at a minimum, the main focus now is on repairing dozer lines constructed during initial and extended attack, commonly referred to as “suppression repair.” There are six excavators and six dozers tackling line rehab. So far, 31 miles of line have been repaired and there are another 7.5 miles pending. There are another 27.5 miles of potential line that are being assessed. Most suppression repair should be complete this weekend, with the exception of Transfer Trail Road. That last piece will take at least another week of work, Scholl said.

The hot, dry conditions will continue through the holiday weekend before a drastic change in the weather early next week. Forecasters are calling for sub-freezing temperatures and possible snow by Wednesday night as a cold front moves into the area late Monday. However, given the weekend forecast, fire managers say it is imperative that hunters, campers and others celebrating the holiday weekend be extremely careful with any activity that could spark a wildfire. A statewide fire ban remains in effect because of the tinder dry conditions in much of Colorado.

Fire closure areas were reduced on Thursday by the White River National Forest and BLM Colorado River Valley office. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads remain closed, as well as areas of the Flat Tops Wilderness accessed by those roads. A new closure order and map for both agencies can be found on the White River NF website. For public and firefighter safety, motorists, recreationalists and hunters are asked to adhere to the closures.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 82%
Total Personnel: 603

Facebook Live Community Meetng tonight at 6 p.m. Tune in to https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO for updates and a live Q&A with the Alaska IMT, local officials and cooperating agencies.

(EAGLE, Colo.) – With no fire growth for the fourth straight day, the Alaska Type 1 Incident Management Team began mapping out a downward glide path for the Grizzly Creek Fire on Wednesday. Fire managers conferred with officials from the White River National Forest, Bureau of Land Management and Colorado Division of Fire Prevention and Control to determine future management plans for the 32,464-acre fire. The Alaska IMT is set to transfer command of the fire in five days and agencies representatives must decide whether to call in a Type 2 IMT or a smaller Type 3 team.

“This will help us get direction on what kind of end state agency administrators want when we leave here,” Alaska IMT Incident Commander Norm McDonald said of Wednesday night strategic analysis.
Containment on the fire reached 82% on Wednesday, an increase of 7%. For the fourth straight day, there was no increase in acreage. Crews have now secured approximately 64.5 of the 78.5-mile fire perimeter.

With warmer, drier conditions, the fire showed a slight pulse on Wednesday with a few visible, early-morning smokes in the French Creek drainage on the north side. The smoke was the result of pockets of isolated, unburned patches of conifers burning up on the interior of the fire. The hot spots were ¼ to ½ mile inside the perimeter and posed no threat.

“It’s a good indicator of what we’ll be seeing over the next four or five days,” Alaska IMT Operations Chief Jon Glover said, alluding to a warming, drying trend that is expected to spawn interior flare-ups of unburned fuel the next few days.

The increased containment – or black line – is the result of three hotshot crews finally securing a piece of rugged, stubborn line in the No Name Creek drainage north of Glenwood Springs that they have been toiling on for the past week. Another hotshot crew closed up a small chunk of open line in the Cinnamon Creek drainage on the south end of the fire. Elsewhere on the fire, crews continue mopping up secured fireline while heavy equipment is being used to repair and restore dozer lines carved out during initial and direct attack.

A large portion of the White River National Forest remains closed, as do some BLM and State of Colorado lands. Coffee Pot and Transfer Trail roads, as well as areas of the Flat Tops Wilderness accessed by those roads are closed. For public and firefighter safety, motorists, recreationalists and hunters are asked to adhere to the closures. For maps and closure info, go to White River NF closure area or BLM closure order and closure map.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Start Date: 08/10/2020
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 75%
Total Personnel: 567

(EAGLE, Colo.) – Firefighters capitalized on a soaking, overnight rainfall as they continued to tame the Grizzly Creek Fire on Tuesday. Nearly one-quarter of an inch of rain fell over the fire area over the course of several hours late Monday and early Tuesday. That will benefit firefighters working to subdue two pieces of active, stubborn fireline, as well as mop up the more passive sections of line.

“A slow, steady rain does a really good job of penetrating the fuels,” said fire behavior analyst Chris Moore with the Alaska Incident Management Team that has command of the fire. “If you get one big dump of rain it runs off before it can be absorbed. This type of rain does a lot beter for moistening those fuels.”

For the third day in a row, the fire showed no growth or increase in acreage. It remains at 32,464 acres and 75% containment. Firefighters have secured roughly 58 miles of the 78.5 miles of fire perimeter.

With the operational campaign switching over to mop up and suppression repair, fire managers remind hunters and recreationalists that a road and trail closure remains in place across much of the White River National Forest and on select BLM lands. There have been several instances recently where firefighters have encountered mountain bikers in closure areas. This creates a dangerous situation for firefighters, heavy equipment operators and mountain bikers on the narrow, twisty trails and roads in the Coffee Pot Road, Cottonwood Pass and Red Canyon areas.

“There are hundreds of miles of trails that remain open to mountain biking outside the closure area,” noted Alaska IMT Incident Commander Norm McDonald. “Out of respect for firefighter and public safety, we ask mountain bikers to adhere to the closures. The last thing we want is a surprise encounter between a mountain biker and a piece of heavy equipment.” For maps and closure info, go to White River NF closure area or BLM closure order and closure map.

Meanwhile, firefighters continue to focus their energy in the usual areas – a roughly 9-mile piece of uncontained line in the No Name and Grizzly creek drainages on the northwest corner of the fire north of Glenwood Springs and about 10 miles of open line in the Cinnamon and Devil’s Hole drainages on the south end of the fire. Infrared flights by drone and aircra? have confirmed those are the two areas of concern, according to fire managers.

As containment goes up, the number of personnel shrinks. There are 567 personnel s?ll working on the fire. That number has dropped by 239 in the last week. There are 11 crews, 4 helicopters and 26 engines s?ll in the tac?cal line-up, plus a cadre of heavy equipment that includes 7 excavators, 5 dozers, 2 skidgines and 1 chipper. Suppression repair is nearly complete on dozer lines north of Coffee Pot Road and is ongoing around Bair Ranch and Red Canyon.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Fire Information/Media Line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov

inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/ htps://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO @fire_grizzly

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Pine Gulch Fire Update

Pine Gulch Fire Statistics: 
Size: approximately 139,007 acres 
Containment: 81%  Total personnel: 658 
Location: Approximately 18 miles north of  Grand Junction, CO 
Reported: July 31, approximately 5:15 p.m. 
Cause: Lightning   

Southern Area Red Team – Mike Dueitt, Incident Commander 
Information Center: (970) 628-0130, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. 
Media Inquiries: (970) 812-3706, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m. 

Special Notes: Bureau of Land Management Closure Areas for the Pine Gulch Fire have decreased and there are no longer evacuation or pre-evacuation orders for the Pine Gulch Fire. Last night Garfield County Sheriff’s Office announced all evacuation and pre-evacuation orders for the Pine Gulch Fire have been lifted. Road closures are still in effect at this time. See Closures below for more information. 

Current Situation: Firefighters continue to monitor, patrol and mop up the Pine Gulch Fire. Yesterday they did a reconnaissance flight over the fire to check for hot spots and assess containment lines made by aircraft. They saw fire slowly backing down in interior isolated areas in drainages along the southern fire edge in the Munger Creek area (Division B). Creeping and smoldering fire was also seen along drainages along the southern rim of the East Salt Creek main canyon, (Division D/E), so hand crews and engines worked to cool that area. 

Repairing damage from fire suppression continues throughout the fire and perimeter. Good progress is being made with work such as restoring water bars on roads, spreading piled up dirt and vegetation and mulching cut brush and limbs. Suppression repair on the east and northwest sides of the fire (Divisions Z and D/E) continued. Work on County Road 256 helped open access to hunters as archery season begins today. Yesterday suppression repair work began in the East Salt Canyon area north of Highway 139. Specialized heavy equipment has been ordered to complete suppression repair work. 

Weather Forecast & Fire Behavior: Mostly sunny with high temperatures at low elevations near 80 degrees and at high elevations near 75 degrees. Relative humidity will be 15-20 percent. Winds will be from the northwest/west northwest with gusts up to 20 mph this afternoon. High pressure building across the Great Basin will bring temperatures 5-10 degrees above normal and relative humidity below 15 percent through the end of the week, when winds will increase and shift to the southwest.  

No fire perimeter growth is expected and smoldering and creeping fire activity will continue within containment lines. Isolated pockets of live and dead vegetation will continue to burn in the interior of the fire. With increasing winds and dry conditions, elevated fire weather conditions may once again develop. New ignitions outside current containment lines have potential for active fire spread, so the public is asked to observe fire restrictions and follow fire prevention measures,  

Major Closures: Roan Creek Road (204) at North Dry Fork (200). The 21 Road north of the BLM boundary, 16 Road at V 8/10 Road, and the Q 5/10 Road is closed at 18 Rd.  

Today the BLM reduced its closure area, opening up areas northwest, west and south of the fire. Garvey Canyon Road remains closed. County Road 256 east of Douglas Pass is now open, but motorists may encounter delays. North Fruita Desert 18 Road, campground and bike trails are now open as well as the base of Bookcliffs and Coal Canyon. V 2/10 Road north of the Wild Horse Management area and County Road 209 are also open. Mount Garfield hiking trail remains open to foot travel. Please see: www.facebook.com/BLMColoradoFire  

Emergency Alerts: For Garfield County, please visit garco911.com. Mesa County alerts, please visit bit.ly/Emergency_Alerts.  

Temporary Flight Restrictions: A Temporary Flight Restriction is in place over the Pine Gulch Fire. Wildfires are a No Drone Zone. If you fly, we can’t. For more information, visit http://knowbeforeyoufly.org

For More Information:  Information office: (970) 628-0130, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.  Media inquiries: (970) 812-3706, 8 a.m. – 8 p.m.  Email: 2020.PineGulch@firenet.gov  Inciweb: https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6906/  Facebook: https://facebook.com/PineGulchFireCO Interactive fire map: https://arcg.is/W0izr 
Highway information: https://cotrip.org/home.htm     

Equipment and Personnel Include: 3 Type 1 hand crews, 6 Type 2 hand crews, 3 helicopters, 33 engines, 10 bulldozers, 19 water tenders, 2 masticators 3 skidgens and overhead/support personnel 

Pine Gulch Fire Update

GCSO: Most pre-evacuation orders lifted in the Grizzly Creek Fire area

Garfield County Sheriff’s Office – Effective at noon today and in collaboration with the Incident Command Team (Alaska Team Incident Management) the evacuation and pre-evacuation orders on the Grizzly Creek Fire have been lifted for all of Lookout Mountain, Spring Valley Ranch, High Aspen, Homestead Estates, Coulter Meadows, Bair Ranch and Crystal River Ranch residents.

Pre-evacuation orders are still in place for the residents of No Name, due primarily to weather concerns for a potential debris flow and associated flooding that might occur.

All road closures have been lifted except for the Coffee Pot Springs Road. This is an area closure by the Forest Service and applies to all motorized vehicles including motorcycles and dirt bikes as well as pedestrians. Any one not associated with the Incident Management Team or who is not a first responder found in this area, will be subject to appropriate fines and immediate removal.

This is still an active fire with only 75% containment. There are 589 people being directed by the Incident Management Team to combat this fire. This requires not only a large number of ground personnel, but also the movement of equipment into and out of the area.

Everyone is asked to respect this area closure for the safety of themselves and the men and women combating the Grizzly Creek Fire.

GCSO: Most pre-evacuation orders lifted in the Grizzly Creek Fire area

Grizzly Creek Fire update

Incident Commander: Norm McDonald 
Start Date:
08/10/2020                                     
Location: Glenwood Canyon
Cause: Human
Fire Size: 32,464 acres
Containment: 75%
Total Personnel: 589

(EAGLE, Colo.) – Strong afternoon wind gusts swept over the Grizzly Creek Fire area for the second day in a row and once again control lines held. Despite wind gusts measured at more than 40 mph over parts of the fire, there was no increase in acreage while containment bumped up to an estimated 75%.

The strongest winds were between 8,000 – 11,000 feet, according to Incident Meteorologist Nathan Heinert. Winds at lower elevations and in valleys weren’t quite as strong. “A lot of the fire was protected, which is a good thing,” he said.

That containment lines rose to the challenge two days in a row validates all the hard work and long hours that hundreds of firefighters have put in the past 3 ½ weeks. Sixty of the approximately 80 miles of fire perimeter are now contained.

Mother Nature provided a helping hand Monday night with a steady rain that dropped two-tenths of an inch of rain over most of the fire area. Fortunately, the rain wasn’t heavy enough to prompt any concerns about runoff or flash floods, said Heinert.

Operational focus on Monday remained on uncontained line in the No Name and Grizzly Creek drainages. Three hotshot crews succeeded in connecting two pieces of hand line along the southwest of rim of Grizzly Creek and fire managers are hoping to connect that line to No Name Creek today to secure that edge of the fire.

An unmanned aerial system (aka drone) was used to inspect the two drainages on Monday. “They looked really good,” Alaska IMT Operations Section Chief Karen Scholl said. “They weren’t showing much heat at all.”

Suppression repair continues to ramp up and fire managers are hoping to add more heavy equipment to the lineup. There are currently six dozers, six excavators and two chippers working to rehab lines in the areas of Coffee Pot Road, Bair Ranch, Red Canyon and No Name.

The Forest Service announced the fire was human caused at a Facebook Live community meeting held in Eagle on Monday. The investigation into the specific cause will continue.

Interstate 70 remains open. Expect periodic delays for firefighting operations and possible flash floods in the event of heavy rain. Go to cotrip.org for information on interstate closures.

Road/trail closures remain in effect for Coffee Pot Road, Transfer Trail Road and areas of the Flattops Wilderness accessed by those roads, as do many surrounding White River National Forest and BLM roads. For maps and closure info, go to White River NF closure area or BLM closure order and closure map.

A Temporary Flight Restriction (TFR) is in place over the fire. Go to https://tfr.faa.gov for details.

Fire Information/Media Line: (970) 930-1850
Email: 2020.grizzlycreek@firenet.gov
inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/6942/ ? https://www.facebook.com/GrizzlyCreekFireCO ? @fire_grizzly

Grizzly Creek Fire update