GCECA: Fire closes Douglas Pass

Garfield County Emergency Communications Authority

Hwy 139 is closed between mile-markers 12 to 39 both directions, Douglas Pass, due to a wildland fire. Fire is putting off a lot of smoke.

BLM: Small fires in Garfield County

The BLM reported a number of spot fires in western Garfield County yesterday. Federal maps show these north of Debeque in Garfield County, west of Rifle and one along the Hogback range north of Silt.

USFS: Sylvan Fire burning south of Eagle

Updates
Sylvan Fire in Eagle County on Inciweb
Sylvan Fire evacuation and community information

Pitkin County alert
6-21-21 9:00 a.m.
As of 6:30 a.m., the upper Frying Pan from the dam to Hagerman Pass is under pre-evacuation notice, due to the Sylvan Fire. An evacuation center is set up at the Basalt High School (600 Southside Drive). If you choose to evacuate and need resources, please go to the Basalt High School. More information is available at ecemo.org, or follow your local media and social media for updates.

White River National Forest: Sylvan Fire
June 20, 2021 8:59 p.m.

EAGLE, Colo. — Sixty firefighters, four single-engine air-tankers and a light helicopter worked the 180-acre Sylvan Fire 12 miles south of Eagle, Colo. today.

The fire is burning in timber on the White River National Forest about half a mile from Sylvan Lake State Park. Firefighters reported extreme fire behavior, as strong winds pushed the fire to the south and southeast.

The fire was reported about 3:15 p.m. today. The cause is currently unknown and under investigation.

Campers and others recreating in Sylvan Lake State Park and much of the surrounding lands have been evacuated. Much of the area in the vicinity of the fire has been closed, including Sylvan Lake State Park. Firefighters have taken steps to protect structures at the state park. Other infrastructure at risk includes a major power line in the burn area.

The latest information, including a map of the closure when it is available, is being posted at https://inciweb.nwcg.gov/incident/7562/.  

White River National Forest: Sylvan Fire update June 20, 2021 6 p.m.

Federal and local firefighters are on-scene of the Sylvan Fire burning about ½-mile west of Sylvan Lake State Park in Eagle County. The fire is estimated at 90 acres and growing in lodgepole pine and other timber on the White River National Forest. It is being pushed by high winds and firefighters are reporting extreme fire behavior.

Additional ground crews and aerial resources have been ordered. Campers and others recreating in Sylvan Lake State Park and much of the surrounding lands have been evacuated. Crews are working on structure protection preparation work in Sylvan Lake State Park. There is a major transmission line in the fire area.

The cause is unknown. More information will be shared when it becomes available.  

CDPHE: Air Quality Health Advisory for wildfire smoke

Issued for Moffat, Rio Blanco, Garfield, Routt, and Eagle counties

Issued at 6:30 PM MDT, Sunday, June 20, 2021

Issued by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Affected area:  Moffat, Rio Blanco, Garfield, Routt, and Eagle Counties. Locations include, but are not limited to Craig, Meeker, Rifle, Glenwood Springs, Steamboat Springs, Eagle, and Vail.

Advisory in effect:  6:30 PM MDT, Sunday, June 20, 2021 to 9:00 AM MDT, Monday, June 21, 2021.

Public health recommendations: If smoke is thick or becomes thick in your neighborhood you may want to remain indoors.  This is especially true for those with heart disease, respiratory illnesses, the very young, and the elderly.  Consider limiting outdoor activity when moderate to heavy smoke is present.  Consider relocating temporarily if smoke is present indoors and is making you ill.  If visibility is less than 5 miles in smoke in your neighborhood, smoke has reached levels that are unhealthy.

Outlook:  Areas of moderate to heavy smoke have been observed across the advisory area Saturday evening due to smoke transported from both in-state and out-of-state wildfires.  Smoke will likely linger overnight as the winds turn calm, particularly in valley locations. 

For the latest Smoke Outlook, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/addendum.aspx#smoke

For more information about smoke and your health, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/wildfire.aspx

For the latest Colorado statewide air quality conditions, forecasts, and advisories, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/colorado_summary.aspx

Social media:
http://www.facebook.com/cdphe.apcd
http://twitter.com/cdpheapcd

GCECA: Fire closes Douglas Pass

Cottonwood Pass to open to local traffic only

Beginning Sunday, Aug. 23, Cottonwood Pass will open for critical, local passenger vehicle traffic.

Allowable local traffic includes trips such as: 

  • Travel to/from work or school.
  • Travel to/from medical, dental, or veterinary appointments.
  • Travel to/from other essential businesses or services in Eagle, Garfield or Pitkin counties.

Only regular passenger vehicles and pick-up trucks will be allowed on Cottonwood Pass without pre-approval. Travelers should be prepared to show proof of their need to travel, such as a work ID card or badge, confirmation of a doctor’s appointment, or a letter from their employer.

Local construction and delivery truck traffic will be accommodated by reservation only between 8 a.m. and 10 a.m. and between 4 pm. and 6 p.m. on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. To request a reservation, complete the form located at https://forms.gle/eNDyTd1QntqJ78Md6 or contact esf1.transportation@eaglecounty.us. Vehicles must be 35 feet in length or less. 

Cottonwood Pass is a narrow, winding road with blind corners and a varied road surface that is not designed to accommodate heavy traffic. Officials are asking motorists to refrain from using the pass for discretionary trips for the duration of the I-70 closure.

Through traffic, recreational vehicles and trailers remain prohibited on Cottonwood Pass. Through traffic should use the Colorado Department of Transportation approved detour routes, available at www.cotrip.org

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Cottonwood Pass abrirá solo para el tráfico local

A partir del domingo 23 de agosto, Cottonwood Pass se abrirá solo  para el tráfico para vehículos de pasajeros que sean locales y de función crítica.

El tráfico local permitido incluye viajes como:

  • De ida/vuelta al trabajo o la escuela.
  • De ida/vuelta a citas médicas, dentales o veterinarias.
  • De ida/vuelta a otros negocios o servicios esenciales en los condados de Eagle, Garfield o Pitkin.

Solo se permitirán vehículos de pasajeros regulares y camionetas en Cottonwood Pass sin la necesidad de aprobación previa. Los viajeros deben estar preparados para mostrar una prueba de su necesidad de viajar, como una tarjeta de identificación de trabajo o una insignia, la confirmación de una cita con el médico o una carta de su empleador.

La construcción local y el tráfico de camiones de reparto se atenderán con reserva solo entre las 8 a.m. y las 10 a.m. y entre las 4 p.m. y 6 p.m. los lunes, miércoles y viernes. Para solicitar una reservación, complete el formulario ubicado en https://forms.gle/eNDyTd1QntqJ78Md6 o comuníquese con esf1.transportation@eaglecounty.us. Los vehículos deben tener una longitud de 35 pies o menos.

Cottonwood Pass es una carretera estrecha y sinuosa con esquinas ciegas y una superficie de carretera variada que no está diseñada para adaptarse al tráfico pesado. Los funcionarios piden a los automovilistas que se abstengan de usar el pase para viajes opcionales o a su discreción personal durante el cierre de la I-70.

Para el tráfico de paso, los vehículos recreativos y los remolques están prohibidos en Cottonwood Pass. Para el tráfico de paso, se debe utilizar las rutas de desvío aprobadas por el Departamento de Transporte de Colorado, disponibles en www.cotrip.org.

Cottonwood Pass to open to local traffic only

New limits on large gatherings, other emergency strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19

Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin County are issuing a Public Health order to minimize the health impacts of COVID-19.

Not only has COVID-19 presented in our tri-county region, but there has also been community transmission between affected individuals. The role of counties is to protect the health, safety and welfare of their citizens.

The Public Health order will become effective immediately and will be revisited on April 8, 2020.

Under this order from Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin counties, Public Health prohibits large gatherings and events of more than 50 people (see information below regarding schools and restaurants). Gatherings of less than 50 attendees are prohibited, unless measures are taken by event organizers to minimize risk.

This Order is adopted pursuant to the legal authority set forth in sections 25-1-506 and 25-1-508, Colorado Revised Statutes. Under these laws, the local Public Health Director(s) has the duty to investigate and control the causes of the epidemic or communicable diseases and conditions affecting public health and to establish, maintain, and enforce isolation and quarantine, and in pursuance thereof, and for this purpose only, to exercise physical control over the property and over the persons of the people within the jurisdiction of the agency as the agency may find necessary for the protection of the public health.

Large events and gatherings

Under this Public Health order in Eagle, Garfield, and Pitkin counties:

· Events with more than 50 attendees are prohibited.

· An event is a gathering for business, social, or recreational activities including, but not limited to, community, civic, public, leisure, or sporting events; parades; concerts; festivals; assemblies; conventions; fundraisers; and similar activities.

· An event does not include activities that are primarily individual or occur in small groups or in non-congregate settings, such as places of employment or primarily small-group sports like skiing, as long as social distancing occurs, particularly in areas where congregating in groups is unavoidable, such as lift lines.

· An event does not include restaurants, as long as restaurants adhere to the requirements for social distancing.

Events with fewer than 50 attendees are recommended to take the following steps to mitigate risks.

· Social distancing recommendations include limiting contact of people within 6 feet from each other.

· Older adults and individuals with underlying medical conditions that are at increased risk of serious COVID-19 are encouraged not to attend (including employees).

· Potential screenings for COVID-19 symptoms each day and exclusion from the gathering if symptomatic.

· Proper hand hygiene and sanitation measures must be readily available to all attendees, employees, and vendors.

· Environmental cleaning guidelines from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are followed (e.g., clean and disinfect high touch surfaces daily or more frequently).

Why now?

These actions are the most available and effective tools to help slow the spread of the virus in our community – and, importantly, to reduce the number of potential deaths caused by COVID-19.

By slowing the spread, we have a chance to protect our family, friends, and neighbors who are at risk for severe illness. In particular, this includes all adults over age 60 and anyone with an underlying health condition.

These actions will limit the cascading impacts on critical services due to high absenteeism if large numbers of workers become ill. Such actions will help hospitals, first responders, and other healthcare services continue to provide services for those who need them (along with utilities, human services, and businesses) in the coming weeks and months.

Who enforces?

We will not be actively searching for violations, but if we receive reports of events contrary to the order, we will reach out to the organizer to educate and provide guidance.

Schools

At this point, we are not recommending closing schools, but we are watching the outbreak closely and may determine that school closures are necessary.

Schools, parents and employers should take steps now to prepare for the possibility of prolonged mandatory closures.

In particular, schools should plan for how to continue to provide non-educational support for their students such as providing food, developmental disability support, and school-based healthcare.

Collective action can save lives

We all have a lot at stake for the safety of our community.

Giving up social events will not be easy, but this is our best chance to save lives. These actions will help to contain the spread of COVID-19 to protect everyone. This is also in support of the most vulnerable in our community.

The more united we can be in preventing the spread the greater the benefit for the whole community.

Heath Harmon
Director
Eagle County Public Health & Environment

Yvonne Long
Executive Director
Garfield County Public Health

Karen Koenemann
Public Health Director
Pitkin County Public Health

Pitkin County Standing Public Health Order Related to Events
Garfield County Standing Public Health Order Related to Events

MEDIA INFORMATION

Garfield County: Renelle Lott, Chief Communications Officer, 970-366-2275

Pitkin County: Jenny Cutright, Pitkin County IMT PIO, 970-924-0614 (Media Hotline)

New limits on large gatherings, other emergency strategies to slow the spread of COVID-19

10 new presumptive positive cases in Colorado CDPHE confirms limited community spread of COVID-19 in Colorado

DENVER, March 11, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) identified 10 new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19, based on overnight testing results. The 10 new presumptive positive cases are in Pitkin, Eagle, Gunnison, Denver, Jefferson, and Arapahoe counties. That brings the total number of presumptive positive cases to 27, with one indeterminate case that public health is acting on as a presumptive positive. The state lab has run tests on approximately 300 people in Colorado since testing started on February 28.

Based on the information CDPHE is receiving from presumptive positive cases, CDPHE has reason to suspect we are seeing limited community spread in Colorado. The Governor’s office will be holding a press conference at 5 p.m. tonight with more details. CDPHE has recommendations for ways to limit further community spread below. 

Case 1:
Gender: Male
Age: 70s
County of residence: Eagle
Exposure: Under investigation

Case 2:
Gender: Female
Age: 50s
County of residence: Gunnison
Exposure: Under investigation

Case 3:
Gender: Male
Age: 50s
County of residence: In Pitkin County, but resident of Australia visiting Aspen
Exposure: Travel, close contact with individuals

Case 4:
Gender: Female
Age: 20s
County of residence: In Pitkin County, but resident of Australia visiting Aspen
Exposure: Travel and contact with individuals

Case 5:
Gender: Female
Age: 70s
County of residence: Jefferson
Exposure: Travel

Case 6:
Gender: Male
Age: 70s
County of residence: Jefferson
Exposure: Travel

Case 7:
Gender: Female
Age: 50s
County of residence: Gunnison
Exposure: Under investigation

Case 8:
Gender: Male
Age: 40s
County of residence: Denver
Exposure: Travel

Case 9:
Gender: Female
Age: 80s
County of residence: Arapahoe
Exposure: Under investigation

Case 10:
Gender: Female
Age: 60s
County of Residence: In Pitkin County, but resident of Australia visiting Aspen
Exposure: Travel, close contact with individuals

Limited community spread (or transmission) means there are cases and outbreaks in certain communities where people became infected, and we are unable to identify the source. Limited person-to-person spread (or transmission) means a person in Colorado became infected from a known exposure to another person in Colorado.  

For limited community spread, community-based interventions such as school dismissals, event cancellations, and creating employee plans to work remotely can help slow the spread of COVID-19. If there is ongoing spread in a community, local and state officials, in consultation with federal officials when appropriate, will make decisions about implementing community interventions based on the scope of community spread. Community interventions may be different for each community.

No matter where you live, everyone should practice daily preventive actions to reduce the risk of transmission, especially to people who may experience more severe illness. People in high-risk categories include:

  • Older people (over age 60), especially those over 80 years.
  • People who have chronic medical conditions like heart, lung, or kidney disease, or diabetes.
  • Older people with chronic medical conditions are at greatest risk.

Other ways people can help reduce the spread of COVID-19 in communities:

  • Stay home when sick.
  • Don’t shake hands in greeting — instead bump fists or elbows.
  • When possible, increase the distance between people. Six feet is a distance that reduces the transmission of the virus.
  • If there is active transmission between multiple people in your community, consider reducing the number of large group gatherings.    
  • Try to go out as little as possible. 
  • Discourage children and teens from gathering in other public places while school is dismissed to help slow the spread of COVID-19 in the community. 
  • Consider ways of getting food brought to your house through family, social, or commercial networks.
  • If you have older or at-risk neighbors/family members check in with them frequently and see if they have any specific needs. 

These measures could reduce the strain on local health care systems and help ensure that those who need treatment are able to get it. 

State officials will share more information at a press conference at 5 p.m. today at the Governor’s Office at the state capitol. Media advisory to follow.

To ensure expedience on reporting presumptive positive cases, the state will provide overall testing statistics as soon as we are able on the website.  Continue to stay up to date by visiting colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus.

10 new presumptive positive cases in Colorado CDPHE confirms limited community spread of COVID-19 in Colorado

Two new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Colorado today

DENVER, March 09, 2020: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s (CDPHE) state lab identified two new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19, based on 21 tests completed between 10 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. today.

Additionally, there was one case that resulted in two separate indeterminate results; this means that the test did not provide conclusive results. Per Center for Disease Control (CDC) guidelines, CDPHE must send that test to the CDC for additional testing. Out of an abundance of caution, CDPHE will treat that individual as a positive case until we receive conclusive results. 

The positive cases are:

Case #1

  • Female in her 70’s 
  • County of residence – Eagle
  • Exposure: no known contact with an infected person, but does have a recent history of travel in US.

Case #2

  • Female in her 30’s
  • County of residence – Denver
  • Exposure: no known contact with an infected person and no recent travel.

The indeterminate case is:

  • Female in her 70’s
  • County of residence – Denver
  • Exposure – no known contact with an infected person, but does have a recent history of travel in US.

These cases are in addition to one presumptive positive case announced this morning, for a total of three new presumptive positive cases on March 9 and one indeterminate case being treated as positive until CDC can confirm results. 

For total numbers of cases to date in Colorado, visit the CDPHECOVID-19 Fast Facts Page.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus

_____________________

Se registran dos nuevos presuntos casos de COVID-19 en Colorado

DENVER, Marzo 9, 2020: El laboratorio del Departamento de Salud y Medioambiente de Colorado (CDPHE) identificó 2 nuevos presuntos casos de COVID-19, basados en 21 exámenes llevados a cabo entre las 10:00 a.m. y 2:30 p.m. del día de hoy.  

Adicionalmente, se registró un nuevo caso derivado en dos resultados separados indeterminados, esto significa que el examen no dió resultados conclusivos.  De acuerdo a los lineamientos del Centro del Control y Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC), CDPHE debe de enviar los resultados de las pruebas al CDC para exámenes adicionales.  Como medida de prevención, CDPHE debe de tratar a cada individuo como un caso positivo hasta que se reciban los resultados finales.

Los casos positivos son:

Caso #1

  • Mujer en sus setentas. 
  • Condado de residencia – Eagle
  • Exposición: Desconocido contacto con persona infectada y tiene historial de viaje reciente. 

Caso #2

  • Mujer en sus treintas
  • Condado de residencia- Denver
  • Exposición: Desconocido contacto con persona infectada y no tiene historial de viaje reciente. 

El caso indeterminado es:

  • Mujer en sus setentas
  • Condado de residencia- Denver
  • Exposición: Desconocido contacto con persona infectada y si tiene historial de viaje reciente.

Estos casos son adicionales al caso presuntamente positivo anunciado esta mañana, lo que suma un total de 3 nuevos presuntos casos positivos en marzo 9 y un caso indeterminado que ha sido tratado como positivo hasta que el CDC pueda confirmar los resultados. 

Para el total de casos en Colorado, visite the CDPHECOVID-19 Fast Facts Page.

Manténgase actualizado en colorado.gov/cdphe/2019-novel-coronavirus

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment logo
Two new presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Colorado today

Six additional presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Colorado, at least five have recently traveled internationally

Date: Fri, Mar 6, 2020 at 4:50 pm
Subject: Release: Six additional presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Colorado, at least five have recently traveled internationally

DENVER, March 6: The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment’s state lab had six additional presumptive positive tests today; at least five of the cases had an international travel history. The state is coordinating with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on flights that may have had a COVID-19 case.  

The health department is releasing the following information about the six additional cases of COVID-19 in Colorado. 

As of March 6, 2020, eight cases of COVID-19 have been identified in Colorado:

Denver County

  • One case in a man in his 40s. The investigation is ongoing. 
  • One case in a woman in her 70s, exposed during international travel.

Douglas County

  • One case in a school-aged female, exposed during international travel.
  • One case in a woman in her 40s, exposed during international travel. 
  • One case in a woman in her 70s, exposed during international travel. 

Eagle County

  • One case in a woman in her 50s, exposed during international travel. 

El Paso County

  • One case in a man in his 40s. The investigation is ongoing.

Summit County

  • One case in a man in his 30s, an out-of-state resident who was exposed during international travel or through contact with an out-of-state case.

This week, the state laboratory expanded testing guidelines to ensure early detection– and slow down and limit transmission. 

“The increase in positive tests is not unexpected, and based on the experience of other states, the public health and health care systems have been preparing for additional cases,” said Executive Director Jill Hunsaker Ryan.  

When cases test positive, the individual and their close contacts like family members and roommates are asked to voluntarily “isolate” (isolation is in the case of a person with a positive COVID test) or “quarantine” themselves (quarantine is if there is a suspected exposure), while the state or local public health agency work to identify other possible contacts. Public health agencies can issue individual quarantine and isolation orders requiring individuals to remain at home for a certain period of time. The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and local public health agencies began to issue orders yesterday with the announcement of positive cases.

Per protocol, local public health agencies are acting as the lead investigator on cases involving people who reside within their jurisdictions and will provide information as necessary and appropriate to protect the public’s health. The state will provide technical assistance to counties and will act as the lead investigator on any cases that occur in Colorado but involve residents of other states or countries.  The department will update numbers on our website and provide daily media summaries over the course of the coming days. 

COVID-19 is primarily spread through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. People who have sustained contact within six feet of an infected individual are most at risk of transmission.

The department continues to work closely with the CDC and public health agencies across the state and is committed to protecting the health and safety of Coloradans. Health officials advise Coloradans to stay informed, take simple disease prevention measures, and prepare. 

• Practice good hygiene. Thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water. In the absence of soap and water, use hand-sanitizer; use a tissue or your elbow or sleeve to cover coughs and sneezes
• Stay home if you’re sick; keep your children home if they are sick. Talk to your employer about working from home if possible.
• We advise Coloradans to always be prepared for an emergency and have a plan for your family. Coloradans can visit the CDC’s website for more information on how to create a plan.
• Stay informed with reliable, up-to-date information. People who have general questions about coronavirus disease 2019, can call CO HELP at 303-389-1687 or 1-877-462-2911 or email COHELP@RMPDC.org, for answers in English and Spanish (Español), Mandarin (???), and more. Coloradans can also visit the CDC and CDPHE websites for more information on best practices.
• If you have upcoming travel plans, visit the CDC’s website for latest travel information.

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www.colorado.gov/cdphe/cdphenews

Six additional presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 identified in Colorado, at least five have recently traveled internationally