Janssen vaccine deployed to regional sites

The state has allocated some of Colorado’s first doses of the Janssen (also known as Johnson and Johnson) vaccine to Eagle, Mesa and Pitkin counties.

Each will be hosting appointment based vaccine clinics this weekend for those that meet the current phase criteria.

For more information and to make an appointment:

Eagle County COVID vaccine

Mesa County COVID vaccine

Pitkin County COVID vaccine

For those who cannot get an appointment for one of this weekend’s clinics, more vaccine shipments will continue to arrive in the state. The state hopes to expand to phase 1B.4 by the end of the month.

Janssen vaccine deployed to regional sites

CDPHE adding second-infection cases to data dashboard

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is adding 822 cases to the data dashboard today that meet the standard national criteria to define persons who had a second infection of the virus that causes COVID-19. The cases have report dates of Aug. 20, 2020, through Feb. 28, 2021, and represent 0.19% of Colorado’s total case count. Cases range in age from 1 – 101 with a median age of 42 years and are distributed among 45 Colorado counties. Forty-nine percent are female. 

The criteria the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses to define persons with a second infection is two positive molecular amplification tests, such as a PCR test, separated by 90 days or longer. The measure of whether the two tests actually represent two different infections, as opposed to one continued infection with intermittent shedding of the virus, is whether they are genetically different from each other. However, it is rarely possible to make this definitive determination due to availability of specimens.

A lab needs access to the first and second samples to perform genetic sequencing. Because most labs don’t keep samples for more than a few days, the state lab is unable to sequence for the vast majority of these cases. Additionally, extended storage can reduce the quality of a specimen and second infections often have lower viral load, affecting our ability to perform genetic sequencing. To date CDPHE’s State Public Health Laboratory has successfully sequenced seven specimen pairs of sufficient quality to make a determination about true reinfection. Of those seven, five were genetically different, representing true reinfection, the other two were not.  It’s important to note that the criteria used to define a new case or reinfection may change as we learn more about how long immunity lasts. 

While reinfection is rare, it’s not unexpected based on what we know from similar viruses. Coloradans should continue to protect themselves, whether or not they have already had COVID-19, by following public health protocols – hand washing, mask wearing, physical distancing, and avoiding gatherings.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE adding second-infection cases to data dashboard

CDPHE: Latest statewide SARS-CoV-2 model: 1 in 194 Coloradans currently infected

Transmission control and vaccinations are critical with the new B.1.1.7 variant

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and the Colorado School of Public Health released an updated statewide modeling report showing that the effective reproduction number for SARS-CoV-2 statewide is just below one, and transmission control dropped from 83% to 76% over the last week. Currently 1 in 194 Coloradans are estimated to be infected. 

The modeling results show that if the B.1.1.7 variant spreads rapidly in Colorado, high levels of transmission control and/or vaccination will be critical to avoiding another large surge. 

The latest modeling provides projections based on COVID-19 hospital census data through February 22, 2021. The models are based on Colorado data and incorporate assumptions reflecting the current state of the science.

Key findings from the report:

  • The effective reproduction number is close to 1 at 0.95. Transmission control has decreased to 76% from 83% last week.
  • Estimated infection prevalence: 1 in 194 people in Colorado are currently infectious.
  • If Colorado remains on the current trajectory, state-wide hospital demand and cases will continue to decline. It will be over a month before hospital demand and infection prevalence reach levels comparable to last summer.
  • In the coming months, transmission control measures will help prevent another surge in infections, hospitalizations, and deaths while the rate of vaccination increases.
  • If the B.1.1.7 variant spreads rapidly in Colorado and transmission control lessens over the short-term, we could see another peak in hospital demand. In the bounding scenario with reduction of transmission control to 60% immediately and rapid spread of the variant, demand could exceed ICU capacity and approach hospital capacity.
  • With regard to vaccination, increased vaccine distribution and high levels of vaccine uptake will lead to more immediate benefit and would increase the level of protection should there be a surge of the B.1.1.7 variant. 
  • Mobility is stable in the Denver metro area. Restaurant visits spiked in ski regions over the President’s Day holiday weekend.

The Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) assembled the expert group that works with the state on modeling projections. The group includes modeling scientists at the ColoradoSPH and the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, as well as experts from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of Colorado Denver, and Colorado State University. 

All previous modeling reports are available on the Colorado School of Public Health’s COVID-19 website. 

The state will continue to review data and model findings as the pandemic continues to inform policy decisions. Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: Latest statewide SARS-CoV-2 model: 1 in 194 Coloradans currently infected

CDPHE: State deactivates crisis standards of care for healthcare staffing and EMS services

The state deactivated the Colorado’s Crisis Standard of Care (CSC) Plan for healthcare staffing and emergency medical services on Feb. 11. 

Crisis standards of care are recommendations for how the medical community should allocate scarce resources, such as ventilators and intensive care unit beds, in the extreme case when patient needs exceed available resources. 

The deactivation is consistent with the declining cases of COVID-19 and hospitalizations due to COVID-19. 

The crisis standards of care for personal protective equipment (PPE) remains active. The crisis standards of care for personal protective equipment allows health care providers to extend the use of or reuse some PPE. It also allows for the use of alternate equipment to provide some protection from disease transmission, when supplies are scarce. 

Coloradans can help ensure we don’t need to return to crisis standards of care for staffing and emergency medical services by following public health protocols (hand washing, physical distancing, mask wearing, staying home when sick, and getting vaccinated when eligible).

Read a fact sheet about the crisis standards of care and visit the website for the latest information. Crisis standards of care can be reactivated if adherence to public health protocols drops and/or variants spread rapidly. 

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: State deactivates crisis standards of care for healthcare staffing and EMS services

CDPHE: State Vaccine Equity Outreach Team coordinates vaccine clinics statewide

Thousands of doses administered through community clinics

The Vaccine Equity Outreach Team, co-chaired by Jill Hunsaker Ryan, Executive Director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Rick Palacio, Strategic Consultant to the Governor is working to schedule more than 175 vaccine equity clinics across Colorado in partnership with community based organizations, local public health agencies, and Tribes. By the end of the day tomorrow, 66 vaccine clinic events will be completed, administering 20,890 doses to disproportionately impacted communities. 

“Equity isn’t something we can leave to chance. We have to get out into communities, plan clinics, and answer questions about the vaccines,” said Rick Palacio. “We know people are juggling more than ever, so we are going to meet them where they are. I’m grateful for community organizations that are partnering with us to provide relief to communities that have been disproportionately impacted,” said Rick Palacio, Strategic Consultant to the Governor. 

The Vaccine Equity Outreach Team typically supplies the vaccine doses, staffing support, and technical assistance. The team works with community organizations who execute outreach to their community members and registration. 

The goal of the team is to reduce health inequities in Colorado by providing vaccine to the most under resourced communities and vaccinating 70% of eligible citizens in these communities with:

  • A community based clinic in 50% of the top 100 census tracts for high density of low income and minority communities. The state has reached 37%. 
  • Strengthen community partnerships in the fight against COVID-19.
  • Increase public trust in the COVID-19 vaccine and the agencies that provide it.

“I have dedicated my public service career working to ensure that there is equality for all people in Colorado especially people of color, the poor and underserved,” said COVID-19 Vaccine Equity Outreach Team Member, the Honorable Elbra Wedgeworth. “The State Outreach Equity team is working very hard to ensure there is fair allocation of COVID-19 vaccine throughout Colorado especially to people that have been the most impacted by this virus.”

Community-based organizations include: 

  • Graham Memorial Church of God & Christ: Adams County
  • STRIDE Community Hospital Clinic: Arapahoe County
  • The Southern Ute Indian Tribe: Tribally-led and CDPHE supported
  • The Ute Mountain Ute Tribe: Tribally-led and CDPHE supported
  • Mountain Family Health Center: Garfield County
  • Pueblo Community Health Center: Pueblo County 
  • Family Medicine Clinic for Health Equity – CAHEP: Denver County
  • Axis Health System: La Plata County
  • Sunrise Community Health Center – Monfort Family: Weld County
  • Mental Health Partners: Boulder
  • Greater Ignacio Community: La Plata County
  • Saint Mary’s Orthodox Church / Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahedo Church: Arapahoe County
  • New Beginnings Ministry / Guardian Angel Church: Adams County
  • United Church of Montbello: Denver County
  • Project Angel Heart: Denver County
  • Whittier Neighborhood Association / Cole / Five Points – Brother Jeff Cultural Center: Denver
  • YWCA Pueblo: Pueblo County
  • Volunteers of America: La Plata County
  • Village Exchange Center: Arapahoe County
  • Ouray County Public Health: Ouray County
  • Delta County: Delta County
  • Evans Medical Center: Denver County
  • Vuela for Health – Centro San Juan Diego: Denver County
  • Church of God and Christ: Arapahoe County 
  • Southern Colorado Harm Reduction Association: Pueblo County
  • Saint Francis Center: Denver County
  • Aurora Mental Health: Arapahoe County
  • Town of Bennett: Adams and Araphoe Counties
  • Aurora Economic Opportunity Coalition: Adams County
  • Montbello Recreation Center: Denver County
  • Ventanilla de Salud (Servicios de La Raza): Denver County
  • Clayton Early Learning: Denver County
  • The Center for African American Health: Denver County
  • Foothills Regional Housing: Jefferson County
  • El Paso County Public Health: El Paso County
  • Solid Rock Baptist Church: Adams County
  • Dahlia Senior Center: Denver County
  • Mental Health of Denver: Denver County
  • Dayton Opportunity Center / Living Water Ministry: Denver County
  • Denver Park Hill Seventh Day Adventist: Denver County
  • African Chamber of Commerce: Arapahoe County
  • Colorado Primary Care Clinic, Inc.: Arapahoe County
  • New Life Christian Center: Denver County
  • Mi Casa Resource Center: Denver County
  • Jefferson Center for Mental Health: Jefferson County
  • The Arc Pikes Peak Region: El Paso County
  • Advanced Urgent Care and Occupational Medicine: Adams County
  • Every Child Pediatrics: Adams County
  • Primary Care by Lora Health, South Federal Practice: Denver County
  • Compound Compassion: Arapahoe County
  • Harvest Church: Arapahoe County
  • Martin Luther King, Jr. Library: Denver County
  • Barnum Recreation Center: Denver County
  • Bear Valley Library: Denver County

Registration is required for every vaccine event. Community Based Organizations interested in partnering with the State of Colorado can fill out this Request for COVID Immunization Event form.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: State Vaccine Equity Outreach Team coordinates vaccine clinics statewide

State adds county-level data to vaccine dashboard for increased transparency for Colorado

REMOTE, (Feb. 19, 2021): Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced that as of 4 p.m. today the vaccine data dashboard includes county-level vaccine administration data in beta. 

The goal of the expanded data dashboard is part of the state’s commitment to prioritize data transparency throughout the COVID-19 response, to inform an equitable vaccine distribution process, and ensure accountability. 

The new beta version of the county-level vaccine administration includes:

  • “Number of doses administered” 
    • Doses administered shows the total number of doses administered to individuals who reside in each county.
    • The county that a person is assigned to is based on their home address information recorded in the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS).
    • This counts doses and not people fully vaccinated, so some of the doses counted are second doses. 
    • When you click on a county, you will see that county’s demographic information like age, sex, and race/ethnicity. To prevent the release of potentially identifying information, demographic information is given for counties or regions with populations of at least 100,000. In other words, counties with a population less than 100,000 are grouped together in regions whose total population sums to 100,000 or more people.
  • “Number of doses administered per 100,000 population”
    • Doses Administered per 100,000 shows the rate of doses administered per 100,000 to individuals who reside in each county.
    • Doses administered per 100,000 does not equate to actual doses administered. It is a rate that adjusts the number of administered doses by each county’s population. The numerator is the actual doses administered multiplied by 100,000. The denominator is the county’s population. The purpose of this section of data is to show a comparable statistic for every county. The number of doses administered per county is based on what has been reported to the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS). 
  • “Doses distributed”
    • Doses distributed shows the total number of doses that have been shipped to providers in each county. Occasionally, doses shipped to a provider in one county are redistributed to a provider in a different county. Those redistributions are not accounted for in these numbers.
    • Doses distributed does not currently include the sixth dose for Pfizer vials, and we are counting 10 doses for Moderna vials. Because providers are able to get a sixth dose out of Pfizer vials and an 11th dose out of Moderna vials, the number of doses available in each county is likely larger than the doses distributed number. 
    • Doses distributed only includes doses ordered by Colorado and does not include federal programs like the Federal Retail Pharmacy Program for COVID-19 Vaccination.
  • “Doses distributed per 100,000 people”
    • Doses distributed per 100,000 shows the rate number of doses per 100,000 that have been shipped to providers in each county.
    • Doses distributed per 100,000 people does not equate to actual doses administered. It is a rate that adjusts the number of distributed doses by each county’s population.
  • “Difference between percent of doses distributed and percent of state population”
    • This shows how many doses are distributed to a county compared to that county’s population. In most cases, the percent distributed and percent of state population align. The outliers occur because sometimes doses are distributed to a large provider in one county that then distributes them to other providers or hosts large mass vaccination clinics that serve people from many counties.

The public, local public health agencies, local elected officials, and the media have all requested this data. Today CDPHE is launching the dashboard in beta so that these audiences can offer feedback to make sure our data transparency is meeting their needs. 

The state has been able to distribute vaccines as quickly as the federal supply chain allows and is working hard to make sure a vaccine will eventually be available to everyone who wants one. 

Until the COVID-vaccine is widely available and community immunity is achieved– we need everyone to keep following public health protocols to mitigate this virus: wear a mask, physically distance, avoid gatherings, stay home when you’re sick, and wash your hands. 

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

State adds county-level data to vaccine dashboard for increased transparency for Colorado

State health department team looks at air pollution, COVID-19 at the census-tract level in Colorado

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) today released an analysis that shows an increase in long-term exposure to fine particle air pollution is generally associated with more COVID-19 infections, hospitalizations, and deaths at the census-tract level in Colorado. The analysis also underscores  the well-established association between communities of color and COVID-19 outcomes. 

Initially, the team set out to look primarily at the relationship between fine particle air pollution and COVID-19 outcomes, accounting for possible confounding factors, but researchers found they needed more local pollution data to fully understand the relationship. However, significant associations between communities of color and COVID-19 outcomes stood out clearly. 

The findings are consistent with national studies on the association between long term air pollution exposure and poorer health outcomes from a COVID-19 infection and with Colorado’s hospitalization data, but the analysis expands what we know about case and death numbers by controlling for 20 variables at the census-tract level.

“Centuries of structural discrimination in the U.S. housing system mean people of color and low-income populations often live near busy highways and industrial areas where pollution is worse. The resulting disproportionate harm to these communities is documented in many studies,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director, CDPHE. “We’ll accelerate our efforts to implement additional monitoring in areas that have higher levels of air pollution and will continue to do everything we can to ensure an equitable pandemic response.”

Adjusting for possible confounding factors such as census-tract-level rates of physical distancing, underlying health conditions, socioeconomic status, population density, age, and fine particle pollution, the analysis found that:

  • Tracts with larger proportions of non-African American people of color, a demographic group composed mainly of Colorado’s Hispanic community, have a statistically higher risk of COVID-19 infections (31%), hospitalizations (44%), and deaths (59%).
  • Tracts with larger proportions of non-Hispanic African Americans have a statistically higher risk of COVID-19 infections (4%) and hospitalizations (7%).
    • The results suggest these areas may also have a higher risk of COVID-19 deaths (4%), but this result was not statistically significant. 
  • Tracts with larger proportions of essential workers have a higher risk of COVID-19 infections (5%).

Regarding fine particle pollution, the analysis found an increase in long-term exposure is associated with more infections, hospitalizations, and deaths. Since air monitors are not available in every census tract, the team used four established scientific models to estimate air pollution level in census tracts that don’t have any monitors. The statistical significance of the association was found in only one of four air pollution exposure models the team used in the analysis.

Focusing on health equity in the COVID-19 response is a department priority with strategies that include:

  • Continuing to support free community testing in disproportionately affected neighborhoods. The sites are open to anyone, regardless of immigration status or insurance coverage.
  • Continuing to provide critical information regarding the pandemic in six languages.
  • Monitoring and reporting vaccine administration data by race/ethnicity, age group, and gender, with new requirements for providers to collect this information, unless the patient does not want to provide it.

Reducing barriers to vaccination for those who lack idenfication by directing providers to use the “honor system,” taking the individual’s word on age, residency, and other eligibility criteria, in order to preventneedless barriers for people who are undocumented, experiencing homelessness, have a disability and/or lack mobility, or are otherwise unable to obtain an ID. 

Asking that providers consider every Coloradan who is currently eligible to get vaccinated, without regard to their affiliation or history with the hospital, medical coverage status, or ability to pay.

  • Requiring large providers to send an equity plan to the department’s Chief Medical Officer.
  • Coordinating “pop up” clinics in partnership with community-based organizations and churches in underserved communities and neighborhoods with “vaccine deserts.” We are also working with 9Health Fair to use their established infrastructure and community partnerships to pilot clinics.
  • Coordinating with transportation providers to assist Coloradans with mobility barriers or without personal vehicles. 
  • Facilitating a Champions for Vaccine Equity program to provide information to communities of color about the safety and efficacy of vaccines, plus utilizing Promotoras, service providers, and crisis counselors to support vaccine literacy. 
  • Developing and growing a vaccine media marketing campaign featuring medical professionals from diverse backgrounds and engaging influencers and local public health agencies to help get the word out to hard-to-reach communities.

In addition to the lack of local air quality data, it is important to note other limitations of the analysis. These include that the analysis indicates correlations (not causes) and looks only at long-term exposures to air pollution (from 2002 to 2016), not current or short-term exposures. The analysis will be submitted to a peer-reviewed publication.

______________________________________________________________________

El equipo del Departamento de Salud Pública del Estado observa la contaminación atmosférica, y la incidencia de casos de COVID-19 al nivel del área de censo en Colorado 

El estudio añade más evidencia sobre la relación entre las comunidades de color y las consecuencias de la pandemia 

El Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE, por sus siglas en inglés) publicó hoy un estudio que muestra que un aumento en la exposición a largo plazo a partículas finas en la contaminación atmosférica se asocia generalmente con más infecciones del COVID-19, hospitalizaciones y muertes al nivel del área del censo en Colorado. El estudio también enfatiza la relación bien establecida entre las comunidades de color y los resultados del COVID-19.

Inicialmente, el equipo se enfocó primeramente en estudiar la relación entre las partículas finas en la contaminación atmosférica y los resultados del COVID-19, tomando en consideración las posibles variables de confusión, pero los investigadores descubrieron que necesitaban más datos sobre la contaminación local para comprender completamente la relación existente. Sin embargo, se destacaron claramente asociaciones significativas entre las comunidades de color y los resultados del COVID-19.

Los hallazgos son consistentes con los resultados de estudios nacionales sobre la relación entre la exposición a la contaminación atmosférica a largo plazo, y los resultados de salud más graves debido a una infección del COVID-19, así como con los datos de hospitalizaciones de Colorado. Pero el estudio amplía lo que sabemos sobre los números de casos y muertes, al controlar 20 variables al nivel del área de censo.

“Siglos de discriminación estructural en el sistema de vivienda de los Estados Unidos significa que las personas de color y las poblaciones de bajos ingresos, con frecuencia, viven cerca de carreteras congestionadas y áreas industriales donde la contaminación es peor. El resultado del daño desproporcionado en estas comunidades está documentado en muchos estudios”, dijo Jill Hunsaker Ryan, Directora Ejecutiva del CDPHE. “Aceleraremos nuestros esfuerzos para implementar un monitoreo adicional en áreas que tienen mayores niveles de contaminación atmosférica y seguiremos haciendo todo lo posible para garantizar una respuesta equitativa ante la pandemia”.

Al ajustar las posibles variables de confusión, tales como las tasas de distanciamiento físico al nivel del área de censo, las condiciones de salud subyacentes, el estado socioeconómico, la densidad de la población, la edad y la contaminación por partículas finas, el análisis encontró que:

  • Las áreas con mayores proporciones de personas no afroamericanas de color, un grupo demográfico compuesto principalmente por la comunidad hispana de Colorado, tienen un riesgo estadísticamente mayor de infecciones del COVID-19 (31%), hospitalizaciones (44%) y muertes (59%).
  • Las áreas con mayores proporciones de afroamericanos no hispanos tienen un riesgo estadísticamente mayor de infecciones por COVID-19 (4%) y hospitalizaciones (7%).

 O   Los resultados sugieren que estas áreas también pueden tener un mayor riesgo de muertes por COVID-19 (4%), pero este resultado no fue estadísticamente significativo.

  • Las áreas con mayores proporciones de trabajadores esenciales tienen un mayor riesgo de infecciones por COVID-19 (5%).

Con respecto a la contaminación por partículas finas, el estudio encontró que un aumento de la exposición a largo plazo está asociado con más infecciones, hospitalizaciones y muertes. Ya que los monitores para examinar la calidad de aire no están disponibles en cada área de censo, el equipo utilizó cuatro modelos científicos establecidos para estimar el nivel de contaminación del aire en áreas de censo que no cuentan con ningún monitor. La importancia estadística de la asociación se encontró solo en uno de los cuatro modelos de exposición a la contaminación atmosférica que el equipo usó para el estudio. 

Enfocarse en la equidad de salud como parte de la respuesta ante el COVID-19 es una prioridad del departamento, y sus estrategias incluyen:

  • Continuar apoyando las pruebas de detección comunitarias gratuitas en vecindarios afectados de manera desproporcionada. Los centros están abiertos para cualquier persona, independientemente de su estatus migratorio o cobertura de seguro.
  • Continuar proporcionando información crítica sobre la pandemia en seis idiomas.
  • Monitorear y reportar los datos sobre la administración de vacunas según raza/etnicidad, grupo de edad y género, con nuevos requisitos para que los proveedores reúnan esta información, a menos que el paciente no quiera proporcionarla.
  • Reducir las barreras de acceso a la vacunación para aquellos que no cuentan con una identificación, al pedir a los proveedores que utilicen el “sistema de honor”, confiando en la información que la persona comparte sobre su edad, su residencia y otros criterios de elegibilidad, con el fin de prevenir barreras innecesarias para las personas que son indocumentadas, que carecen de vivienda, tienen una discapacidad y/o carecen de movilidad, o que no pueden obtener una identificación.
  • Pedir a los proveedores que consideren a cada habitante de Colorado que actualmente es elegible para ser vacunado, sin tener en cuenta su afiliación o historial con el hospital, el estado de cobertura médica o su capacidad de pago.
  • Requerir que los grandes proveedores envíen un plan de equidad al Director Médico del departamento.
  • Coordinar clínicas “temporales” en asociación con organizaciones comunitarias e iglesias en comunidades y vecindarios desatendidos con “desiertos de vacunas”. También estamos trabajando con 9Health Fair para utilizar su infraestructura establecida y asociaciones comunitarias para organizar clínicas.
  • Coordinar con los proveedores de transporte para ayudar a los habitantes de Colorado con barreras de movilidad o sin vehículos personales.
  • Facilitar un programa de Campeones para la Equidad de Vacunas para proveer información a las comunidades de color sobre la seguridad y eficacia de las vacunas, además de utilizar Promotoras, proveedores de servicios y consejeros de crisis para brindar conocimiento sobre las vacunas.
  • Desarrollar una campaña de mercadotecnia de vacunación presentando a médicos profesionales de diversos orígenes, a personas con influencia en la comunidad y agencias locales de salud pública para ayudar a llegar a las comunidades de difícil acceso.

Sumado a la falta de datos sobre la calidad del aire a nivel local, es importante notar otras limitaciones de este estudio. Esto incluye que el estudio indica correlaciones (no causas) y sólo examina las exposiciones de contaminación atmosférica a largo plazo (del 2002 al 2016), no las exposiciones actuales o a corto plazo. El estudio será enviado a una publicación arbitrada.

State health department team looks at air pollution, COVID-19 at the census-tract level in Colorado

CDPHE: Winter storms across country delay vaccine shipments to Colorado

Winter storms affecting a vaccine distribution hub in Tennessee have delayed vaccine shipments to several states this week. The delay impacts Colorado’s allocation of 133,000 vaccines that were expected to arrive today through Thursday. 

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment is working with Colorado’s health care providers and local public health agencies across the state to make adjustments over the coming days to make sure appointments and clinics do not need to be canceled. In anticipation of the holiday weekend, Colorado requested and received doses Friday that were originally scheduled for this week. This decision helps us have enough on hand to work with providers to move doses around to prevent cancelations. 

Colorado, along with all other jurisdictions and federal entities and programs were impacted by the delay because the weather issues were occurring at the hubs. The state expects more information about when we will receive the vaccine as the weather clears and shipping operations resume.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: Winter storms across country delay vaccine shipments to Colorado

CDPHE: seventh amended public health order

The governor’s seventh amended public health order has been amended. The following is a summary of the amendments.

Summary of changes for Seventh Amended PHO 20-36:

  • Section II.C.2.h:  Restaurants in Level Blue may accommodate up to 225 people indoors using the Distancing Calculator
  • Section II.C.2.k:  seated Indoor Events in Level Blue may accommodate up to 225 people indoors using the Distancing Calculator
  • Section II.D.2.k: Indoor Events in Level Yellow may accommodate up to 150 people using the Distancing Calculator
  • Section II.D.2.q:  table games are allowed Casinos in Level Yellow
  • Section II.E.2.q: table games are allowed for Casinos in Level Orange
  • Appendix M, Section V.C.3:  counties in Level Blue do not get any additional capacity for businesses certified to participate in the 5 Star Program
CDPHE: seventh amended public health order

CDPHE: State sends letters to vaccine providers and school superintendents, school leaders, and licensed child care providers

The state’s COVID-19 Incident Commander Scott Bookman sent a letter to vaccine providers statewide today as part of the state’s ongoing communications with providers to ensure that the vaccine distribution process is as efficient as possible. Bookman also sent a letter to school superintendents, school leaders, and licensed child care providers. 

The letters provide guidance as the state moves into Phase 1B.2 on Feb. 8 and begins vaccinating 65+ year olds, as well as child care workers, PK-12 educators and school staff.   

The letter to providers:

  • Specifies that as the state moves through phases, people in previous phases remain eligible, and that providers should continue to prioritize Coloradans age 70+ to get vaccinated. 
  • Provides additional information about how PK-12 educators and qualified child care providers will receive vaccines including that through March 5, the state is allocating 30,000 doses per week for child care workers in licensed child care programs, PreK-12 teachers, and school staff. Because of the need to be equitable, and because we are unable to completely fill the dosage needed to vaccinate all school district employees at once, we are asking all school districts larger than 5,000 students to prioritize their staff and vaccinate ? of their employees every week until complete.
  • Outlines a vaccine transfer process that ensures vaccines aren’t wasted. 
  • Collects weblinks and phone numbers for the public to contact providers. 
    • Federally qualified health centers and small community providers and clinics serving underserved communities may choose not to publish their registration information, but they must have another way to effectively communicate with their clients and others in the community whom they plan to serve with a vaccine. If this applies to your organization, please complete this form describing which populations you serve and how you plan to get the word out about your vaccination clinics. 
  • Introduces a new public health order requiring providers to report race/ethnicity data where possible to help inform equitable distribution of the vaccine. 

The letter to superintendents, school leaders, and licensed child care providers reiterates this information. 

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: State sends letters to vaccine providers and school superintendents, school leaders, and licensed child care providers