CDOT: CO Hwy 133 McClure Pass closure tonight, February 13, 7 p.m. due to avalanche risk

??TRAVEL ALERT?? | CO 133 McClure Pass

#CO133 #McClurePass will be CLOSED TONIGHT, Saturday 2/13, starting at 7 p.m. The safety closure is due to avalanche conditions. No eastbound or westbound traffic will be allowed between Mile Points 36 and 46. #CDOT crews are monitoring the area and will assess conditions again tomorrow morning (Sunday 2/14). #KnowBeforeYouGo and keep an eye on COtrip.org for up-to-the-minute road conditions. All alerts are also posted on CDOT’s Twitter page.

#wholesystemwholesafety

?? ALERTA DE VIAJE | ?? CO 133 McClure Pass

#CO133 #McClurePass estará CERRADO ESTA NOCHE, sábado 2/13, a partir de las 7 p.m. El cierre de seguridad se debe a las condiciones de la avalancha. No se permitirá tráfico hacia el este o hacia el oeste entre Mile Points 36 y 46. #CDOT los equipos están monitoreando la zona y volverán a evaluar las condiciones mañana por la mañana (domingo 2/14). #KnowBeforeYouGo y estén pendientes de COtrip.org para Condiciones de carretera hasta el minuto. Todas las alertas también están publicadas en la página de Twitter de CDOT.

#wholesystemwholesafety

CDOT: CO Hwy 133 McClure Pass closure tonight, February 13, 7 p.m. due to avalanche risk

CDOT: I-70 eastbound reopened for passenger vehicles only near MM 109

I-70 eastbound is now reopened near exit 109 for passenger vehicles, but commercial vehicles, such as semis, are still not allowed. This includes vehicles with trailers. Motorists should anticipate delays while work continues to remove a semi from the Colorado River, and equipment is moved out of the area during the afternoon. Westbound traffic remains unaffected.

CDOT: I-70 eastbound reopened for passenger vehicles only near MM 109

CDOT travel alert: Delays expected on I-70 eastbound between New Castle and Glenwood Springs on Jan. 27

Drivers should expect significant delays expected on Wednesday, Jan. 27, for eastbound I-70 traffic between Rifle and Glenwood Springs due to a vehicle recovery. Motorists must plan for major impacts, expected to begin at 9 a.m. and lasting until dark. Overwidth traffic MUST use an alternate route. Motorists should plan for the possibility of an eastbound traffic closure, in order to accommodate the vehicle recovery. All road conditions and updates will be posted to COtrip.org and CDOT’s Twitter page.

We are anticipating recovery work may need to resume on Thursday in order to complete the job. If work is required on Thursday, motorists should again plan for delays for eastbound traffic coming into Glenwood Springs.

The recovery is to remove a FedEx truck from the Colorado River just west of Glenwood Springs. The truck was involved in a crash on Sunday. In order to recover the semi and two trailers, crews will need to use a crane. The only place to locate the crane is on the righthand side of eastbound I-70. Our goal is to have one lane of eastbound traffic moving slowly past the crane on the lefthand side (of the eastbound deck). If there is not enough room to safely have a lane of eastbound traffic move slowly through the area, CDOT will enact a full eastbound closure. At that time the closure would take place at Mile Point 109 and eastbound I-70 traffic will be turned around at that location.

The work is taking place tomorrow due to a short weather window before the next storm.

Photo credit: Colorado State Patrol

CDOT travel alert: Delays expected on I-70 eastbound between New Castle and Glenwood Springs on Jan. 27

CDOT puts stimulus funding to work for Coloradans

DENVER – CDOT has received approval from the Colorado Transportation Commission for a plan to spend $134 million in federal stimulus for transportation. The approved plan advances projects from the department’s strategic pipeline of projects that focuses on the state’s most pressing transportation priorities.

“We are wasting no time putting federal dollars from the stimulus package to work for Coloradans to create jobs and reduce traffic. Today, our state’s transportation commission approved a list of shovel-ready transportation projects across the state that are part of our 10-year transportation plan and which will create jobs and other economic benefits across the state including smoother, safer surfaces on major roads like I-76 and US-50, improved connections between Fort Collins and Denver, and better road design in downtown Grand Junction,” said Governor Polis. “We are also allocating a portion of these dollars to local governments and will work with them to ensure that these too are spent quickly in a manner that immediately benefits residents. Washington must continue to build on this down payment as Colorado builds back stronger than before the pandemic.” 

“We appreciate the rapid collaboration of our CDOT team, our local partners, and the Transportation Commission over the holidays that allowed us to ring in the new year by putting these new federal stimulus dollars to work,” said Transportation Commission Chair Karen Stuart. “Because of our ten-year transportation plan, CDOT has a great ready-to-go list of projects across the state that allows us to commit new dollars quickly and transparently.”

As part of the $900 billion COVID relief package passed and signed into law late last month, $10 billion in surface transportation stimulus will be available to states. Colorado should see just over $134 million in stimulus funds available through the formula designated in the relief bill. Another $2 billion for airports and airport concessionaires and $15 billion for mass transit was also included; those funds will be allocated to state and local recipients shortly. Additionally, CDOT is receiving $6 million for fixing deteriorating bridges though the federal appropriations package, which were also committed today by the transportation commission. 

“The projects we are advancing today make investments across the state that reflect the diversity of our state and CDOT’s ten-year plan,” said CDOT Executive Director Shoshana Lew. “They range from fixing a notoriously bumpy stretch of US 50 from Grand Junction to Delta, to safety improvements along the Eastern Plains, to an innovative transit hub in Berthoud that will help increase mobility options proximate to the I-25 corridor, to repairing broken bridges and sound walls in the Denver area, to accelerating a top priority intersection project for the Pikes Peak region in collaboration with the Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments.”

The commission also approved additional funding for the Revitalizing Main Streets program to help communities adjust their street and pedestrian spaces during COVID and a small investment in new public outreach and GHG modeling capabilities to assist the department’s efforts to modernize its approach to project environmental studies. A full list of the approved projects is available below, and a recording of the Transportation Commission meeting is available here on CDOT’s YouTube channel.

RegionProjectFunding Description
Denver metroNoise Wall Maintenance$9.7 millionReplacement of badly damaged noise walls. This will provide safety and quality of life benefits for communities located next to highways. The walls specifically addressed by these funds are nearing 50 years in age and have lost their ability to effectively reduce noise as well as support air quality and other environmental conditions.  
Denver metroSuballocation to DRCOG$36.2 millionThe federal formula specifies that $36.2 million of the funds be spent within the geographic parameters of the Denver Regional Council of Governments (DRCOG) area. CDOT will suballocate these dollars to DRCOG for expenditure by local governments, and request quick action to maximize stimulus benefits. Per the discussion among transportation commissioners, CDOT will further urge project selection that prioritizes multimodal projects across the Denver region.
SE COPowers Blvd and Research Parkway Interchange$25.5 million (total project cost is $43.6 million)This project constructs a grade-separated interchange to improve safety and mobility on Powers Blvd (CO 21). Sidewalks and bike lanes will be added to improve multimodal mobility and access to local schools. The Pikes Peak Area Council of Governments is looking to add funds equal to their share of $8.5 million in suballocated funds to support this high-priority project in the area. 
NW COUS 50 Grand Junction to Delta repairs$15 millionThis project will repair notable dips and bumps in the roadway surface that have generated numerous complaints over the years. Along with new asphalt, new guardrails and striping improvements will make this road safer and smoother..
NW COI-70B Phase 5$5.6 millionThis project will continue the corridor improvements  by reconfiguring the 1st Street and Grand Avenue intersection on I-70B in downtown Grand Junction.  Improvements will make the current unconventional 5-legged intersection into a traditional four-way intersection along with making capacity, safety, access and pedestrian improvements.
NE COBerthoud Mobility Hub at I-25 and CO 56$6.5 millionThis project will fund design and interim construction costs for a center-loading express Bustang station, supporting bus service between Fort Collins and Denver.
NE COI-76 Repaving West of CO 144$8 millionThis project, part of CDOT’s Rural Paving Program, will deliver a smoother and safer driving surface.
NE COCO 385 Phillips Repaving$7.1 millionThis project, part of CDOT’s Rural Paving Program, will deliver a smoother and safer driving surface.
NE COCO 119 Adaptive Signal System$2.4 millionThis project will upgrade signals along CO119, one in a series of investments planned for this corridor.
NE COBridge Maintenance: CO 52 near Hudson$250,000CDOT maintenance crews will add additional steel to increase the structural capacity of the bridge. This repair method avoids structure replacement which will extend the safety and usability of the bridge until it can be replaced.
NE COBridge Maintenance: CO 59 near Haxtun$300,000CDOT maintenance crews will add additional steel to increase the structural capacity of the bridge. This repair method avoids structure replacement which will extend the safety and usability of the bridge until it can be replaced.
NE COGuardrail end treatment replacement$1.6 millionRegionwide replacement of substandard end treatments of guardrail sections.
NE COCO 7 & 119th St in Lafayette$2.6This local agency project will add on-street bike lanes, sidewalk connectivity, and the ability for transit vehicles to move more freely through the intersection.
NE COSuballocation to North Front Range Metropolitan Planning Org.$4 millionThe federal formula specifies that $4 million of the funds be spent within the geographic parameters of the North Front Range Metropolitan Planning Organization (NFRMPO) area.  CDOT will suballocate these dollars to NFRMPO for expenditure by local governments, and request quick action to maximize stimulus benefits. 
SW COUS 160 McCabe Creek Major Structure Replacement$7.5 millionThis project replaces a failing culvert beneath US 160 in Pagosa Springs that risks a potential washout of the roadway. In addition to adding a new concrete box culvert, bicycle and pedestrian mobility will be expanded.
SW COCO 141 Resurfacing North of Naturita$3.1 millionThis project, part of CDOT’s Rural Paving Program, will deliver a smoother and safer driving surface.
CDOT puts stimulus funding to work for Coloradans

Minimize travel this holiday week

Maximize safeguards to reduce risk from virus; watch for winter weather early in the week 

DENVER – While nonessential travel is not recommended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Colorado Department of Transportation still anticipates increased traffic along some of the state roadways over Thanksgiving weekend. 

This Thanksgiving, the state of Colorado is urging people to not not gather with anyone outside of your household (people you don’t live with), to wear a mask when you’re outside of your home and stay 6 feet from others. One out of 49 Coloradans is infected with this deadly virus.

“We all have a duty to keep ourselves and each other safe, whether traveling or staying close to home,” said CDOT Executive Director Shoshana Lew. “If you are on the road, stay alert and avoid impaired driving at all costs — unfortunately the holidays can be a dangerous time for accidents. This year, please be extra cautious due to the severe COVID risk that many regions are experiencing right now.  If you do drive, be mindful of the COVID ‘dial level’ where you are traveling, wear a mask, and maintain social distance.” 

Additional information on the COVID-19 dial framework is available here

Expect slick and some snowpacked conditions on roads in the high country and along the Front Range this week, and a challenging Tuesday morning commute for the Denver region

Snow is expected in the mountains and along the foothills beginning Monday night, with two to five inches possible in the Denver metro area, four to eight inches in the foothills and six to ten inches on the I-70 mountain corridor.

Denver motorists should expect a burst of snow to fall quickly during Tuesday’s morning commute, making for a challenging drive with slushy, snow packed and icy conditions likely. The most severe conditions are expected in the suburbs to the west and south of Denver, the foothills and Palmer Divide, according to the forecast.   

If possible, limit travel until the storm moves out later tomorrow.  Motorists should be equipped for winter weather with the appropriate tires. 

Motorists heading to ski areas should check road conditions at www.cotrip.org and review weather forecasts before traveling. This applies to motorists traveling on Interstate 70, U.S. 285 and other major roadways. 

CDOT winter driving tips downloadable flyer: WinterWise Driving Tips.  Please go to the bottom of the release for information on the chain and traction laws. 

Construction work suspended over the holiday and typical traffic volumes on the I-70 Mountain Corridor

CDOT construction and maintenance projects will be suspended beginning Wednesday to help minimize traffic impacts. Projects can resume work on Monday, Nov. 30.  The only exception is for emergency operations.  

Thanksgiving traffic typically is lower than during other holiday weekends. Vehicle numbers through the Eisenhower/Johnson Memorial Tunnels in 2019 was as follows: 

WestboundEastboundTotal
Wednesday, Nov. 2724,88018,57343,453
Thursday, Nov. 2817,42313,97431,397
Friday, Nov. 297,55812,04419,602
Saturday, Nov. 3014,54020,32934,869
Sunday, Dec. 120,31925,61545,934
Total84,72090,535175,255

In addition to checking cotrip.org, drivers can get the latest information on the status of the state’s roadways by calling 511.  Specific information regarding Interstate 70 is available at: www.GoI70.com.  

For more information on how to have a safer Thanksgiving, please see:  https://covid19.colorado.gov/thanksgiving

CHAIN and TRACTION LAWS 

CDOT urges travelers to be aware of chain and traction law codes before heading out on the roadway.

  • Code 18/Commercial Chain Law: Commercial vehicles and trucks must have chains. Vehicles without chains can often lose traction, causing traffic delays and sometimes road closures. For the safety of the traveling public, it’s critical to use chains to be in compliance with Colorado’s chain law.
  • Code 15/Passenger Traction Law: All motorists are required to either have an all-wheel or four-wheel drive vehicle, or (for two-wheel drive vehicles) snow tires or all-weather tires with a mud/snow designation. Tread depth on all tires must be at least 3/16″ regardless of vehicle type. Vehicles that do not meet these criteria must carry chain devices or alternative traction devices such as an AutoSock. The law focuses on passenger vehicles, as commercial vehicles have their own restrictions. It is unlawful to proceed when a state highway is closed or to proceed when a restriction is in effect without the required traction equipment. Violators will be given a citation, which comes with a $100 fine and $32 surcharge. That jumps to a $500 fine with a $156 surcharge if a violation results in the closure of one or more traffic lanes.
  • Code 16/Passenger Chain Law: All passenger vehicles need chains, except for 4WD and AWD vehicles with all-weather tires with 3/16 inch tread depth.
Minimize travel this holiday week

CDOT to close I-70 in Glenwood Canyon for two hours on Wednesday

GARFIELD & EAGLE COUNTIES – In the early hours of Wednesday, Sept. 23, motorists on Interstate 70 should plan for a closure in Glenwood Canyon for the No Name Tunnel lighting replacement project. Eastbound motorists will be stopped at Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs) and westbound motorists will be stopped at Exit 133 (Dotsero). The closure is anticipated to take place from midnight to 2 a.m.  

CDOT and contract partner Casper Electric will be staging equipment and installing the tunnel lighting control center (TLCC) building for the No Name Tunnel lighting replacement project. The TLCC controls the light output of all the tunnel lighting and will allow the traffic operations center in the Hanging Lake Tunnel to monitor the light levels in the No Name Tunnel.

As part of CDOT’s Whole System – Whole Safety initiative, this project will focus on replacing antiquated lighting controls and fixtures with 676 new LED fixtures. The new lighting system will be tied into the Hanging Lake Tunnel Operations Center so the lighting can be monitored and controlled by personnel in the Hanging Lake Tunnel. The updated lights will use less power while allowing more light for the traveling public to have better visibility during the day and night.    

Additional work will consist of: 

  • Slotted drain installation for storm water management
  • Removal of old lighting system and installation of new lighting system.
  • Programming and integration of the lighting control center.
The $3.5 million multi-year project began April 2020 and has an anticipated completion date of January 2022.

OTHER TRAVEL  IMPACTS 
Motorists can expect a westbound single lane closure Monday starting at 7 a.m. through Thursday at 7 p.m.  Hours of operation are Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.  

Lighting replacements are being performed in coordination with the I-70 Glenwood Canyon surface improvement project and communications will be maintained for the duration of the project.      

PROJECT INFORMATION
Those seeking more information about this project, or with questions or comments, can reach the project team at: 

Travelers are urged to “know before you go.” Gather information about weather forecasts and anticipated travel impacts and current road conditions prior to hitting the road. CDOT resources include:

REMEMBER: SLOW FOR THE CONE ZONE
The following tips are to help you stay safe while traveling through maintenance and construction work zones.
  • Do not speed in work zones. Obey the posted speed limits.
  • Stay Alert! Expect the unexpected.
  • Watch for workers. Drive with caution.
  • Anticipate lane shifts and merge when directed to do so
  • Expect delays, especially during peak travel times.
  • Allow ample space between you and the car in front of you.
  • Avoid using mobile devices such as phones while driving in work zones.
  • Turn on headlights so that workers and other drivers can see you.
  • Be especially alert at night while driving in work zones.
  • Be patient!
CDOT to close I-70 in Glenwood Canyon for two hours on Wednesday

CDOT: Preparing travelers for Glenwood Canyon – fall 2020

I-70 in Glenwood Canyon
Motorists should prepare for reduced speeds, no stopping in the canyon and safety closures due to debris flow and other weather-related events. CDOT also urges travelers to stay focused on the road and avoid distracted driving. If there is moderate, heavy or extreme rain in Glenwood Canyon over the Grizzly Creek burn scar, it is very likely there will be a debris flow, mudslides or rockfall. In order to maintain safety on I-70 in Glenwood Canyon, CDOT has a plan in place for protecting the traveling public when there could be a debris flow, mudslides or rockfall.

Safety closures
If there is a flash flood watch for the Grizzly Creek burn scar, CDOT will have personnel and equipment on standby in preparation for a closure. If there is a flash flood warning for the Grizzly Creek burn scar, CDOT will close I-70 in Glenwood Canyon from Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs) to 133 (Dotsero). All traffic will be affected and CDOT will immediately evacuate travelers from the canyon . During the closure, CDOT will monitor the roadway for debris flow, mudslides and rockfall. Personnel and
equipment will be ready to clear the road of debris and assess damage before reopening. CDOT will reopen I-70 in Glenwood Canyon once we’ve confirmed it is safe for the traveling public.

Note: A flash flood advisory is the step between a watch and a warning. In the event of a flash flood advisory , CDOT will be on standby in the same way as during a flash flood watch.

How to plan ahead
Motorists who are planning to travel on I-70 in Glenwood Canyon should pay close attention to weather forecasts. If there is rain in the forecast, be prepared for a closure on I-70 in the canyon. CDOT recommends picking an alternate route in case the canyon closes . Please refer to www.COtrip.org for the latest road conditions and route options. Motorists should be wary of using GPS navigation apps for searching alternate routes, since not all platforms provide up-to-date information. Travelers should avoid
using county or forest roads as alternate routes, as road conditions may not be favorable. CDOT also recommends that travelers bring an emergency kit, with water, snacks, a flashlight and a blanket, as mountain conditions often change suddenly in the fall season.

Driving in the canyon
Travelers are not allowed to stop in Glenwood Canyon while traveling on I-70. This is to protect the traveling public from debris flows, mudslides or rockfall in the canyon. In order to clear the canyon as quickly as possible during a closure, it is important for travelers to be in their vehicles while in the canyon. CDOT is working closely with Garfield and Eagle counties to prevent emergency search and rescue missions during a debris flow or other impacts. By keeping travelers in their cars and moving, we can better prevent search and rescue missions.

Rest areas
Rest areas in Glenwood Canyon are closed, in order to keep travelers on the road while in Glenwood Canyon (see paragraph above titled “Driving in the canyon”). Also, rest areas are located in areas that are more vulnerable to these events. CDOT will continue to monitor and assess safety in those locations. Rest areas may not reopen in 2020.

Bike path
The Glenwood Canyon bike path is closed to all users, in order to keep travelers on the road while in Glenwood Canyon (see paragraph above titled “Driving in the canyon”). The bike path will remain closed through the end of 2020, also due to damage that needs to be repaired before it can be safely reopened.

CO 82 Independence Pass
A popular alternate route is Colorado Highway 82 over Independence Pass. This is not a recommended detour due to restrictions and traffic impacts in September and October due to rockfall mitigation work. The pass is open to passenger vehicles only (cars, vans, SUVs). No commercial motor vehicles (CMVs), camper trailers, recreational or similar vehicles will be allowed and a 35-foot length restriction continues to be in place (year round).

Independence Pass shows as closed on navigation apps in order to prevent commercial traffic from being routed over the pass. All road conditions and closures are posted in real time at COtrip.org. Motorists should expect slow speeds, lengthy travel times and potential delays of up to two hours. Due to rockfall mitigation work, there will be daytime, weekday lane closures
with alternating traffic between mile points 59 to 62.

There will be a few days of full closures of CO 82 on Independence Pass in late September and early to mid-October, due to rockfall mitigation. Travelers should be aware that Independence Pass on Colorado Highway 82 is subject to closures due to inclement weather and is closed in the winter.

______________________________________________________________________________

Preparando a los viajeros para Glenwood Canyon (Otoño 2020)

I-70 en Glenwood Canyon
Los conductores deben prepararse para velocidades reducidas, no detener su automóvil en el cañón y cierres de seguridad debido al flujo de escombros y otros eventos relacionados con el clima. CDOT pide a los viajeros que se mantengan concentrados en la carretera y eviten manejar con distracciones. Si hay lluvias moderadas, fuertes o extremas en el Glenwood Canyon sobre el área quemada de Grizzly Creek, es probable que haya un flujo de escombros, deslizamientos de lodo o desprendimientos de rocas. Para mantener la seguridad en la carretera interestatal I-70 en Glenwood Canyon, el CDOT tiene planes para proteger a los conductores cuando podría haber un flujo de escombros, deslizamientos de lodo o desprendimientos de rocas.

Cierres por seguridad
Si hay una alerta de avenida torrencial para el área quemada de Grizzly Creek, el CDOT tendrá trabajadores y equipo en espera en preparación para un cierre. Si hay una alerta de avenida torrencial para el área quemada de Grizzly Creek, el CDOT cerrará la Interestatal 70 (I-70) en Glenwood Canyon desde la salida 116 (la ciudad de Glenwood Springs) a la 133 (la ciudad de Dotsero). Todo el tráfico se verá afectado y el CDOT evacuará inmediatamente a los conductores del cañón. Durante el cierre, el CDOT continúa monitoreando la carretera en busca de flujo de escombros,
deslizamientos de lodo y desprendimientos de rocas. Los trabajadores y el equipo estarán listos para limpiar el camino de escombros y evaluar los daños antes de reabrir. El CDOT reabrirá la I-70 en Glenwood Canyon una vez que hayamos confirmado que es seguro para el público viajero.

Nota: Una alerta de avenida torrencial es lo que sucede entre una Vigilancia y una Advertencia. En caso de un alerta de avenida torrencial , el CDOT estará en espera de la misma manera que durante una vigilancia de avenida torrencial.

Cómo planificar
Los conductores que planean viajar por la I-70 en Glenwood Canyon deben monitorear las previsiones meteorológicas. Si se pronostica lluvia, prepárese para un cierre en la I-70 en el cañón. CDOT recomienda elegir una ruta alternativa si el cañón se cierra. Consulte el sitio web COtrip.org para conocer las condiciones más recientes en la carretera y las opciones de desvío.

Los conductores deben tener cuidado con el uso de aplicaciones de navegación GPS para buscar rutas alternativas, ya que no siempre tienen información actualizada. Los viajeros deben evitar usar las carreteras del condado o las carreteras forestales como rutas alternativas. Es posible que las condiciones de la carretera no sean las correctas. El CDOT también recomienda que los conductores traigan un equipo de emergencia, con agua, bocadillos, una linterna y una manta, porque las condiciones
de la montaña pueden cambiar repentinamente en la temporada de otoño.

Manejando en el cañón
Los conductores no pueden detenerse en Glenwood Canyon mientras viajan por la carretera interestatal de I-70. Esto es para proteger a los viajeros de los flujos de escombros, deslizamientos de lodo o desprendimientos de rocas en el cañón. Para despejar el cañón rápidamente durante un cierre, es importante que los viajeros permanezcan en sus vehículos mientras están en el cañón. El CDOT está trabajando en estrecha colaboración con el Condado de Garfield y el Condado de Eagle para evitar misiones de búsqueda y rescate de emergencia durante un flujo de escombros u otros
impactos. Al mantener a los viajeros en sus carros y en movimiento, podemos prevenir mejor las misiones de búsqueda y rescate.

Área de descanso
Las áreas de descanso en el Glenwood Canyon están cerradas para mantener a los conductores en la carretera mientras se encuentran en Glenwood Canyon (consulte el párrafo anterior titulado “Manejando en el cañón”). Además, las áreas de descanso se ubican en áreas más vulnerables a estos eventos. El CDOT continuará monitoreando y evaluando la seguridad en esos lugares. Es posible que las áreas de descanso no vuelvan a abrir en 2020.

Carril para Bicicletas
El carril para bicicletas en Glenwood Canyon está cerrado para todos, con el fin de mantener a los conductores en la carretera mientras se encuentran en Glenwood Canyon (consulte el párrafo anterior titulado “Manejando en el cañón”). Este carril para bicicletas permanecerá cerrado hasta 2020, también debido a daños que deben repararse antes de que pueda reabrirse de manera segura.

Autopista CO 82 sobre Independence Pass
Una ruta alternativa popular es la autopista CO 82 sobre Independence Pass. Este no es un desvío recomendado debido a restricciones y impactos de tráfico en Septiembre y Octubre debido a trabajos de mitigación de desprendimiento de rocas. El pase está disponible solo para vehículos de pasajeros (carros, camionetas, SUV). No se permitirán vehículos comerciales de motor (CMV), caravanas o vehículos recreativos. Existe una restricción de longitud de 35 pies (todo el año). Independence Pass está cerrado en las aplicaciones de navegación GPS para evitar que los vehículos comerciales utilicen el pase. Todas las condiciones y cierres de carreteras se publican en tiempo real en el sitio web COtrip.org.

Los conductores esperan velocidades lentas, tiempos de viaje prolongados y retrasos de hasta dos horas. Debido al trabajo de mitigación de desprendimiento de rocas, habrá cierres de carriles durante el día entre semana con tráfico alterno entre los puntos de milla 59 y 62.

Habrá cierres completos de la autopista CO 82 en Independence Pass a finales de Septiembre y de principios a mediados de Octubre, debido a la mitigación de desprendimientos de rocas . Los conductores deben tener en cuenta que Independence Pass en la autopista CO 82 está sujeto a cierres debido a las inclemencias del tiempo y está cerrado en invierno.

CDOT: Preparing travelers for Glenwood Canyon – fall 2020

Travelers should anticipate potential closure of I-70 in Glenwood Canyon due to flash floods

The National Weather Service has announced a Flash Flood Watch for the Grizzly Creek Burn Area in effect until 10 a.m.

COLORADO – Motorists should be prepared for a potential closure of Interstate 70 through Glenwood Canyon due to heavy rainfall that could trigger flash floods, mudslides, rockfall or other hazards to travelers. Heavy rainfall over the Grizzly Creek Burn Area is expected up to and during the period of the Flash Flood Watch, which is in effect until 10 a.m. Motorists should take extra precaution before heading out onto I-70. 

ENCOUNTERING INCLEMENT WEATHER

If you are stuck in a closure waiting for a road to be cleared of mud or rocks, do not leave your car unless absolutely necessary. Never hang out in the grassy median located between lanes. If traffic is moving in the opposite direction, the median can be a hazardous area. Emergency response vehicles and heavy equipment may also need the median area to move about and access the emergency scene.

Lengthy closures on the interstate may also be the result of staged releases. As stopped traffic backs up, creating long lines, traffic will be let go in stages, allowing traffic queues ahead to clear, before releasing more traffic. 

BE PREPARED 

Highway closures can last for as little as a few minutes or for as long as several hours. When drivers set out on a trip, especially through high country roads or the I-70 mountain corridor, it would be wise to have the car supplied with an emergency kit. The kit should contain at the very minimum: water, snacks, flashlight, and a blanket. Remember to also carry water for your pets if you’re traveling with animals. You may even consider packing some items to keep you or children occupied while waiting in the car. Activity books, colored pencils or a deck of cards can help pass the time.   

DRIVER SAFETY 

When motorists drive up onto a flooded area, there are several precautions to follow.  

  • Never drive through any flooded area, you do not know how deep or how fast the water is running. 
  • Even 8-10 inches of water can float an average-sized car, which can be easily swept off the road. 
  • Driving too fast on wet roads or in flooded areas can cause a vehicle to hydroplane. Never use your cruise control during rainy conditions with standing water on the roadway.
  • Any amount of flooding or mud can obstruct the roadway and hinder drivers from knowing exactly where to drive. If you cannot see the roadway, be smart and wait for the water to subside. 
  • Water and mud can contain unknown hazards hidden under the surface – rocks or other debris, like plant material and tree branches.

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO

Travelers are urged to “know before you go.” Gather information about weather forecasts and anticipated travel impacts and current road conditions prior to hitting the road. CDOT resources include:

FIRE INFORMATION

Agencies are responding to the Grizzly Creek Fire in Glenwood Canyon. Updates and information can be found at: 

Travelers should anticipate potential closure of I-70 in Glenwood Canyon due to flash floods

CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon travel alert

Motorists should be prepared for potential safety closures on I-70 in Glenwood Canyon. A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for the Grizzly Creek Burn Area until 10 a.m. The US National Weather Service Grand Junction Colorado is forecasting heavy rainfall over the Grizzly Creek Burn Area, which may lead to flash flooding and debris flows. Travelers should identify an alternate route before hitting the road, in case safety closures are necessary.

If you are stuck in a closure waiting for a road to be cleared of mud or rocks, do not leave your car unless absolutely necessary. Never hang out in the grassy median located between lanes. If traffic is moving in the opposite direction, the median can be a hazardous area. Emergency response vehicles and heavy equipment may also need the median area to move about and access the emergency scene.

Lengthy closures on the interstate may also be the result of staged releases. As stopped traffic backs up, creating long lines, traffic will be let go in stages, allowing traffic queues ahead to clear, before releasing more traffic. #KnowBeforeYouGo

CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon travel alert