CDOT: Highway 13 closure and detours due to wildfire

Colorado Highway 13 continues to be closed north of Meeker, between Mile Point 43 and MP 84. The highway is closed due to the Streeter fire, which started at 8:30 a.m. this morning.

DETOURS
North and southbound traffic traveling to areas nearby are currently being detoured on Strawberry Creek Road, which is Rio Blanco County Road 7 to the south (off of CO 64, west of Meeker) and Moffat County Road 57 to the north (near Maybell). This road is paved.

Motorists north of the fire will need to take the following detours for other destinations:

  • Rifle/Glenwood Springs: US 40 to CO 131 south, towards Silverthorne and I-70, then west on I-70.
  • Grand Junction: US 40 to Dinosaur, then south on CO 64 until Rangley, then south on CO 139 to Loma, then east on I-70.
CDOT: Highway 13 closure and detours due to wildfire

Sinkhole repaired, northbound CO 133 restored in Carbondale

UPDATE June 18 – Carbondale — Northbound traffic on Colorado Highway 133 in Carbondale is back to normal. Today the Colorado Department of Transportation repaired a large sinkhole located just south of the intersection of CO 133 and Main Street, near Mile Point 68. Crews filled, tamped down, capped, and paved the sinkhole, which measured 15 feet in diameter by 12 feet deep. Filling the sinkhole required 125 tons of road base material, delivered with 10 truckloads. Once the sinkhole was repaired and repaved, northbound CO 133 was restored to the roadway at approximately 3:30pm and CDOT ended the short detour nearby. Southbound traffic on CO 133 was not affected throughout the sinkhole investigation and repair.

CDOT thanks the Town of Carbondale for assisting with the immediate and extended response to the sinkhole discovery, including creating a detour, overnight monitoring and providing essential equipment for repairing the hole today.
The sinkhole opened up on Wednesday when a longtime CDOT maintenance employee, Tim Holbrook, tried to fill a pothole on the busy local highway. What looked like a small depression began breaking open and revealed a 12-foot drop into a cavernous, dark hole. “I thought I was staring down into my tomb and grave,” said Holbrook afterwards. CDOT is thankful Tim is safe. His dedication to keeping Colorado’s roads safe truly averted what could have been a catastrophic event.

CDOT will continue to monitor the sinkhole for erosion or changes. At this time a cause remains unclear, and CDOT will continue to work with internal and external experts to determine the source.

June 17 – CDOT: Traffic being detoured around sinkhole on Highway 133 in Carbondale.

Carbondale, CO – Northbound traffic on CO 133 in Carbondale is being detoured at this time due to a 20 feet by 12 feet deep sinkhole. Motorists should plan for an additional 10 minutes due to a short detour onto side streets. The sinkhole and detour are located just south of the roundabout at the intersection of CO 133 and Main Street. CDOT is assessing the sinkhole and will update as more information is available.

Sinkhole repaired, northbound CO 133 restored in Carbondale

CDOT and DNR remind people to avoid heading to the mountains this weekend

STATEWIDE — As the weekend approaches the Colorado Department of Transportation and the Colorado Department of Natural Resources are reminding people to resist the temptation to travel to the mountains for recreational activities. Staying close to home and limiting travel are essential to preventing the spread of COVID-19 in the state.  

“The Governor has said it best, our mountains, rivers, forests, and trails will be there when this pandemic is over and Coloradans are recommended to avoid travel for recreational purposes,” said Dan Gibbs, Executive Director, Colorado Department of Natural Resources. “Although we encourage people to get outside for their own well-being, Coloradans need to keep their recreational activity to local trails and parks, maintain social distancing guidance, and avoid dangerous activities to reduce the strain on our search and rescue and emergency teams.” 

As defined under Governor Polis’ statewide Stay-At-Home order, travel is limited to what is absolutely critical, such as obtaining food or medicine.

“The COVID-19 pandemic is putting a strain on hospitals and first responders everywhere — especially in smaller mountain communities where people often visit for recreation,” said CDOT Executive Director Shoshana Lew. “One of the easiest ways people can help is by staying off the road. This reduces the potential for crashes and the resulting stress on our health care system and local emergency responders. Staying closer to home this weekend will be a safer choice for multiple reasons.”

Car crashes are consistently among the leading injury-related reasons for emergency room admissions in Colorado. Avoiding travel between cities and regions is an important part of limiting the spread of COVID-19 between different communities.

CDOT and DNR remind people to avoid heading to the mountains this weekend