Updated Valley View Hospital COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats 7/7/2020
Specimens collected thru Valley View:  3,566
Positive results: 178
Pending results:  17
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 31
Admitted patients discharged: 22
Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing.

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results in 90 minutes to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View Hospital COVID-19 cumulative stats

City of Glenwood Springs employee tests positive for COVID-19

Glenwood Springs, CO – On Sunday, July 5, 2020, the City of Glenwood Springs was notified that an employee in the Parks and Recreation Department tested positive for COVID-19.  The employee works at the Community Center.  The Community Center will be closed until further notice to accommodate reduced staffing due to precautionary isolation measures.

Following guidelines set forth by the CDC and Garfield County Public Health, the employee who tested positive, as well as others in their immediate work area, are self-isolating. The employee had taken time off for a couple of days preceding the holiday, last working at the pool on Wednesday July 1, 2020, but was tested Sunday at Valley View Hospital after becoming symptomatic.

The City of Glenwood Springs is committed to ensuring the safety and well-being of employees and Community Center users. Garfield County Public Health has begun contact tracing for all individuals that may have been in contact with the employee. People with questions should contact the public health office via email or call 970-945-6614 in Glenwood Springs or 970-625-5200 in Rifle.

The Community Center had partially reopened on June 15, 2020 to reservations. Access was limited with separate entrances to the fitness area and the lap pool and guests could only enter the area for which they had a reservation. All Reservations were made online and no transactions occurred at the front desk. Guests were also required to maintain social distance while using the facilities and strict cleaning guidelines were adopted after each use of fitness areas.

“We knew this was a possibility when we reopened the Community Center and other city facilities. Fortunately, our staff has implemented social distancing and other safety measures to limit, as much as possible, contact with Community Center users, and we hope that this proved beneficial in keeping this an isolated case. Our number one priority is the health and safety of our employees and we will do what is necessary to maintain that goal,” said Mayor Jonathan Godes.

The city will continue to work with Garfield County Public Health throughout this situation and follow recommended procedures.

City of Glenwood Springs employee tests positive for COVID-19

State EOC distributes personal protective equipment and remdesivir

Centennial, Colo. – In the month of June, the Colorado State Emergency Operations Center (SEOC) distributed personal protective equipment (PPE) to local emergency management, public health offices, senior facilities and home care sites. The PPE was secured through the following channels: FEMA, procured by the State of Colorado and donations to fulfill resource requests submitted to the SEOC. Colorado received 1,742 vials of the experimental antiviral drug remdesivir that will treat 290 patients. The vials were distributed to 10 hospital systems. The remdesivir is provided through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the  Strategic National Stockpile. Read more about remdesivir and the HHS partnership here. The distribution from the SEOC included:

PPE and supplies 

  • 34 counties 
  • 8,875 N95  [FEMA]
  • 1,880 KN95  [FEMA]
  • 15,850 surgical masks  [FEMA]
  • 3,960 face shields  [State of Colorado]
  • 174,399 gowns  [State of Colorado]
  • 45,850 gloves  [FEMA]
  • 28 bottles of sanitizer  [State of Colorado]
  • 1,565 thermometers  [FEMA]
  • 46 temperature stations  [Taiwan donation]

Remdesivir

  • Banner Health: 81 vials
  • Centura Health: 396 vials
  • HealthONE: 225 vials
  • Boulder Community Health: 24 vials
  • St. Mary Corwin Pueblo: 36 vials
  • Denver Health: 100 vials
  • SCL:  309 vials
  • UCHealth: 391 vials 
  • Children’s Hospital of Colorado: 168 vials
  • Vail Valley Medical Center: 12 vials 

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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COMUNICADO DE PRENSA

El Centro de Operaciones de Emergencia del Estado de Colorado distribuye equipos de protección individual y remdesivir 

Centennial, Colorado. – 6 de julio de 2020 – En el mes de junio, el Centro de Operaciones de Emergencia del Estado de Colorado (SEOC, por sus siglas en inglés) distribuyó equipos de protección individual (EPI) a las autoridades locales de manejo de emergencias, organismos de salud pública, residencias de ancianos y centros de cuidados residenciales. Los EPI se obtuvieron por medio de las siguientes fuentes: la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA, por sus siglas en inglés), el gobierno estatal de Colorado y donaciones con el fin de satisfacer solicitudes para recursos presentadas ante el SEOC. Se recibieron en Colorado 1,742 frascos del medicamento antiviral experimental remdesivir, el cual se utilizará para tratar a 290 pacientes. Los frascos se distribuyeron en 10 sistemas hospitalarios. El remdesivir proviene del Departamento de Salud y Servicios Humanos de los EE.UU. (HHS, por sus siglas en inglés) y la Reserva Estratégica Nacional. Puede obtener más información acerca del remdesivir y la colaboración con el HHS en este enlace. La distribución de suministros del SEOC incluyó:  

EPI y suministros 

  • 34 condados 
  • 8,875 mascarillas N95 [FEMA]
  • 1,880 mascarillas KN95 [FEMA]
  • 15,850 mascarillas quirúrgicas [FEMA]
  • 3,960 protectores faciales [Estado de Colorado]
  • 174,399 batas [Estado de Colorado
  •  45,850 guantes [FEMA
  •  28 botellas de desinfectante [Estado de Colorado]
  • 1,565 termómetros [FEMA]
  • 46 estaciones para la toma de temperatura [donación de Taiwán] 

Remdesivir

  • Banner Health: 81 frascos
  • Centura Health: 396 frascos
  •  HealthONE: 225 frascos
  • Boulder Community Health: 24 frascos
  • St. Mary Corwin Pueblo: 36 frascos
  • Denver Health: 100 frascos
  • SCL:  309 frascos
  • Hospital de la Universidad de Colorado: 391 frascos
  • Hospital de Niños de Colorado: 168 frascos
  • Vail Valley Medical Center: 12 frascos

 Manténgase informado en: covid19.colorado.gov

State EOC distributes personal protective equipment and remdesivir

Third COVID-19 death reported in Garfield County

GARFIELD COUNTY, CO – A third Garfield County resident has died from COVID-19. This news comes as cases of the virus continue to rise towards 300 in the county, marking a steady increase over the past several weeks.

The deceased man, in his early 70’s, passed away due to COVID-19. His wife also tested positive, and is in quarantine. “We wish the family peace and comfort during this difficult time,” said Public Health Director, Yvonne Long.

“This loss of life underscores the reality that this virus is still spreading in our community, and that we need to remain vigilant. Until we have a vaccine, the only defense we have is to continue to wear face coverings, to socially distance, to wash our hands, and to stay isolated when we are sick. We take these actions to protect ourselves, but also to protect others.”

Third COVID-19 death reported in Garfield County

BOCC: take precautions to limit COVID-19 spread

Simple actions, personal responsibility will help limit spread of illness

GARFIELD COUNTY, CO – The Garfield County Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) requests residents and visitors take simple actions and personal responsibility to help limit the spread of COVID-19, which tests have confirmed in greater numbers around the county in recent weeks.

The county is not able to enter the less restrictive “Protect Our Neighbors” phase of reopening, due to increasing cases of COVID locally.

“With the governor’s latest health orders, all businesses could open with social distancing plans,” said Commissioner Tom Jankovsky. “We are advocating for local control to open our businesses 100 percent, but we won’t be able to meet the criteria if we cannot lower our case count. We all can help us achieve this if we practice safety measures.”

“Be assured, we as county commissioners are doing all we can to get these variances approved and Garfield County opened up,” added Commissioner Mike Samson.

Garfield County Public Health has coined a new motto: “More masks, more distance, more business,” and the board is urging all residents to maintain social distancing, wearing face coverings – per the governor’s order, wash your hands frequently, and to remain at home if you feel ill (do not go to work if you are sick) or have been near someone who has been diagnosed with COVID-19. These simple actions can help to limit the spread of the virus, keep people safe and facilitate the reopening of the economy.

A variance request was approved by the state May 23, allowing restaurants, houses of worship, fitness facilities and gyms to re-open at 50 percent of the posted occupancy code limit, provided they meet safety requirements. “The county’s variances could be in jeopardy if case numbers continue to rise,” said Commissioner John Martin. “As a statutory county government, we must follow the lead of the state.”

“We know that some folks don’t like wearing masks, but the use of facial coverings while in public establishments is the best way to ensure our businesses remain open,” added Jankovsky.

In a short time, the county has gone from a low case count to a high amount of cases. Garfield County has experienced 299 cases of COVID-19 since the pandemic began. To be able to move into the less restrictive Protect Our Neighbors phase, the county would have to meet an extensive set of criteria and demonstrate that viral spread is low, as low as 15 cases in a 14-day period. In the most recent 14-day period there were 42 cases.

“The most concerning statistic is that six of our recent cases required hospitalization in hospitals outside of the county. The increase in cases is a trend we must reverse,” Jankovsky said. “We’ve seen a cluster of cases within construction crews that were working together. Contact tracing took place to ensure that anyone that may have been around these individuals was aware, so potential spread could be limited.”

A construction site in Rifle voluntarily halted construction for two weeks due to COVID-19 cases in its work crews.

While COVID-19 can affect anyone, especially the more vulnerable population, which includes the elderly and people with underlying health conditions, such as heart or lung conditions, obesity or a weakened immune system, most of the new cases are in people ranging from 20 to 59 years old.

According to public health statistics, roughly half of the county’s cases are appearing in Latino or Hispanic families (49 percent), and many cases in the region are people working in the construction and food service industries. Fatigue and cough are the two most common symptoms, followed by body aches, sore throat, fever and headache.

“Make no mistake, this illness doesn’t discriminate by age, and anyone could contract COVID-19. We want everyone to do their part and help us combat the spread of the virus,” Jankovsky said. “COVID-19 is contagious, virulent and aggressive.”

“Let’s get our numbers on the decline. We’re all in this together and together we’ll get by,” added Martin.

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BOCC: tome precauciones para limitar la propagación de COVID-19

Simples acciones y la responsabilidad personal ayudarán a limitar la propagación de la enfermedad

CONDADO DE GARFIELD, CO – La Junta de Comisionados del Condado de Garfield (BOCC) pide a residentes y visitantes tomar medidas simples y tener responsabilidad personal para ayudar a limitar la propagación de COVID-19, ya que las pruebas han confirmado números altos en el condado en las últimas semanas.

El condado no puede ingresar a la fase menos restrictiva de reapertura “Proteger a Nuestros Vecinos”, debido al aumento de casos de COVID localmente.

“Con las últimas órdenes de salud del gobernador, todas las empresas podrían abrir con planes de distanciamiento social “, dijo el Comisionado Tom Jankovsky. “Estamos abogando para el control local y poder abrir nuestros negocios al 100 por ciento, pero no podremos cumplir con los criterios si no podemos reducir nuestros casos. Todos podemos ayudar a lograr esto si practicamos medidas de seguridad.”

“Tengan la seguridad que nosotros, como comisionados del condado, estamos haciendo todo lo posible para que se aprueben estas variaciones y para que se abra el Condado de Garfield”, agregó el comisionado Mike Samson.

Salud Pública del Condado de Garfield ha adoptado un nuevo lema: “Más Cubrebocas, más distancia, más negocio”, y la junta de comisionados urge a todos los residentes a mantener el distanciamiento social, usar cubrebocas – según la orden del gobernador, lavarse las manos con frecuencia y permanecer en casa si se siente enfermo (no vaya a trabajar si está enfermo) o si ha estado cerca de alguien a quien le han diagnosticado con COVID-19. Estas acciones simples pueden ayudar a limitar la propagación del virus, mantener a personas seguras y facilitar que se abra la economía.

El estado aprobó la solicitud de variación el 23 de mayo, permitiendo a restaurantes, lugares de adoración, gimnasios y lugares deportivos volvieran abrir al 50 por ciento del límite de cupo permitido, siempre que cumplan con los requisitos de seguridad. “Las variaciones del condado podrían estar en peligro si los números de casos continúan aumentando”, dijo el comisionado John Martin. “Como gobierno legal del condado, debemos seguir el ejemplo del estado”.

“Sabemos que a algunas personas no les gusta usar cubrebocas, pero el uso de cubrebocas mientras se encuentra en lugares públicos es la mejor manera de garantizar que nuestros negocios permanezcan abiertos”, agregó Jankovsky.

En un corto plazo, el condado pasó de tener un número bajo de casos a una gran cantidad de casos. El Condado de Garfield ha experimentado 299 casos de COVID-19 desde que comenzó la pandemia. Para poder pasar a la fase menos restrictiva, “Proteger a Nuestros Vecinos”, el condado tendría que cumplir con amplios criterios y demostrar que el contagio viral es bajo, tan bajo como 15 casos en un lapso de 14 días. En el período más reciente de 14 días se registraron 42 casos.

“La estadística más preocupante es que seis de nuestros casos recientes requirieron hospitalización. El aumento de casos es una tendencia que debemos revertir”, dijo Jankovsky. “Hemos visto varios casos en cuadrillas de construcción que trabajaban juntos. Se hizo un seguimiento de contactos para garantizar que cualquier persona que haya estado cerca de estas personas estuviera al tanto, para así poder limitar la propagación”.

Un sitio de construcción en Rifle detuvo voluntariamente la construcción durante dos semanas debido a casos de COVID-19 en sus cuadrillas de trabajo.

Mientras COVID-19 puede afectar a cualquier persona, especialmente a la población más vulnerable, que incluye a ancianos y personas con condiciones médicas críticas, como problemas cardíacos o pulmonares, obesidad o un sistema inmunológico debilitado, pero la mayoría de los casos nuevos se están presentando en personas entre 20 a 59 años.

Según las estadísticas de salud pública, aproximadamente la mitad de los casos en el condado aparecen en familias Latinas o Hispanas (49 por ciento), y muchos casos en la región son personas que trabajan en las industrias de construcción y servicio de alimentos. La fatiga y la tos son los dos síntomas más comunes, seguidos de dolores en el cuerpo, dolor de garganta, fiebre y dolor de cabeza.

“No se confundan, esta enfermedad no discrimina edad, y cualquiera podría contraer COVID-

19. Queremos que todos hagan su parte y nos ayuden a combatir la propagación del virus “, dijo Jankovsky. “COVID-19 es contagioso, virulento y agresivo”.

“Pongamos nuestros números en bajada. Estamos todos juntos en esto y juntos saldremos de esta”, agregó Martin.

BOCC: take precautions to limit COVID-19 spread

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

July 2, 2020, GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 Cumulative Stats 7/2/2020

Specimens collected thru Valley View:  3,231

Positive results: 141

Pending results:  23

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 31

Admitted patients discharged: 20

Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Valley View is working hard to be responsive to the COVID-19 testing needs of its patients. COVID-19 diagnostic PCR testing is available across the Valley View network of care. However, a physician referral is required. “At Valley View, our providers are committed to providing smart COVID-19 testing. They want to understand the concerns and symptoms of a patient so that a PCR test can be as effective as possible. For example, if a patient is tested too early relative to their exposure or prior to symptoms, they may receive a false negative result as the virus may still be below the limit of detection. This is not only a disservice to the individual patient but also to our collective efforts as a community to slow the transmission of COVID-19,” stated David Brooks, MD, Chief Medical Officer of Valley View.

If an individual does not have a primary care provider, Valley View’s physician practices can quickly offer VirtualCare and same-day appointments. With locations in Eagle, Glenwood Springs, Silt, Carbondale and Willits, providers are conveniently located across the community. Additional information to schedule an appointment is available at https://www.vvh.org/primary-care/.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.

Additional Questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing.

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results in 90 minutes to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for July 2, 2020

July 2, 2020, RIFLE, COLO – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 Cumulative Stats 7/2/2020:

Number of individuals tested: 1719

Positive results: 66

Pending results: 37

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 2

Patients Transferred: 2

Admitted Patients:  0

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

All Clinic services,  hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately and patients with current symptoms will be scheduled for appointments in the respiratory clinic. 

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear a mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for July 2, 2020

State health department amends Safer-At-Home public health order allowing professional sports to resume and temporarily closing bars

DENVER, July 1, 2020:  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) released an amended Public Health Order 20-28 for the Safer at Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors phase. The order is effective until July 30.

The new guidance and changes are listed below:

  • Professional sports may resume pre-season practices, training, and league play after receiving approval from CDPHE on a reopening plan that details disease prevention and mitigation strategies.
  • Bars that do not serve food from a licensed retail food establishment must close to in-person service. Bars that offer food from a licensed retail food establishment for on-premise consumption and follow the restaurant requirements – including seating all patrons at tables a minimum of 6 feet apart – may operate up to 50% of the posted occupancy limit or 50 patrons indoors, whichever is less. Additionally, bars may use the calculator for indoor events  to allow for occupancy up to 100 patrons indoors.  All bars may continue to operate to-go, curbside and delivery service.
  • Libraries are no longer limited to curb-side only services, though curbside services are encouraged.
  • Real estate open houses may occur in accordance with indoor event requirements.

“We have started to see an increase in cases and are making every effort to prevent transmission of this virus,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Rachel Herlihy. “Bars are more likely to have people congregating and mingling in close proximity, and for longer duration. We have updated the public health order to limit the operation of bars and other alcohol establishments to be in line with our current level of disease transmission.”

For extensive information on Safer-at-Home and in the Vast, Great Outdoors phase, including sector-specific guidance, please visit covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home.  Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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El departamento de salud estatal modifica la orden de salud pública Más Seguros en Casa, permitiendo la reanudación de deportes profesionales y cerrando temporalmente los bares

DENVER, 1 de julio de 2020: el Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE, por sus siglas en inglés) emitió la modificación de la Orden de Salud Pública 20-28 para la fase Más Seguros en Casa y en Nuestros Entornos Naturales. La orden seguirá en vigencia hasta el día 30 de julio.

A continuación se indican los nuevos cambios y directrices:

  • Los deportes profesionales pueden reanudar sus prácticas de pre-temporada, entrenamientos y partidos de ligas después de haber recibido una aprobación por parte del CDPHE de un plan de reapertura que detalle las estrategias de prevención y mitigación de la enfermedad.   
  • Los bares que no sirven alimentos dentro de un establecimiento de venta minorista de alimentos con licencia deben dejar de prestar servicios en persona. Los bares que ofrecen alimentos de un establecimiento de venta minorista de alimentos con licencia para consumo en el lugar y que cumplan los requerimientos para los restaurantes, incluyendo sentar a todos los clientes en mesas con un mínimo de 6 pies de distancia entre cada mesa, pueden operar con un 50% de la capacidad máxima de personas o un máximo de 50 clientes en ambientes cerrados, la cantidad que sea menor. Adicionalmente, los bares pueden utilizar el calculador de espacios para eventos en ambientes cerrados para permitir una capacidad de hasta 100 clientes en un ambiente cerrado. Todos los bares pueden continuar con sus operaciones de servicios para llevar, de entrega al vehículo en la banqueta y de entrega a domicilio.
  • Las bibliotecas ya no están limitadas a servicios de entrega a vehículo en la banqueta, aunque se recomienda este método de entrega de servicios. 
  • Se pueden realizar eventos de puertas abiertas de bienes raíces (open houses), de conformidad con los requerimientos para eventos en ambientes cerrados.

“Hemos comenzado a observar un aumento en el número de casos y estamos haciendo todo lo posible para prevenir la transmisión de este virus”, declaró la Dra. Rachel Herlihy, epidemióloga estatal. “Existe una mayor probabilidad en los bares de que las personas se congreguen y socialicen a una proximidad cercana por períodos más largos. Hemos actualizado la orden de salud pública para limitar las operaciones de los bares y otros establecimientos que ofrecen alcohol para que estén alineados con la incidencia actual de transmisión de la enfermedad”.

Para obtener información más detallada sobre la fase Más Seguros en Casa y en Nuestros Entornos Naturales, incluyendo guías específicas por sector, por favor consulte: covid19.colorado.gov/safer-at-home

Manténgase informado en: covid19.colorado.gov.

State health department amends Safer-At-Home public health order allowing professional sports to resume and temporarily closing bars

State provides tips for enjoying a safe Independence Day holiday

DENVER – As Coloradans get ready to celebrate Independence Day weekend, state officials ask everyone to continue acting responsibly to limit the spread of COVID-19 and to follow all fire restrictions. Colorado has made great progress, but we don’t want our summer fun to result in more cases. We all share the responsibility for protecting the workers we interact with, our loved ones, and higher-risk populations. While celebrating, Coloradans should:

  • Wear a face-covering when around others. 
  • Convene only in small groups.
  • Maintain 6 feet of physical distancing.
  • Follow all local COVID-19 guidelines and fire restrictions. To check fire conditions and restrictions, visit www.colorado.gov/dfpc/fire-restriction-information
  • Avoid risky activities that could lead to COVID-19 exposures or physical injuries. To learn about how to stay safe and assess risks, visit covid19.colorado.gov/risks-benefits

“With the freedom that we celebrate this weekend comes responsibility,” said Scott Bookman, the state health department’s Incident Commander for COVID-19. “We hope everyone will keep taking the daily preventive steps – especially wearing masks and practicing physical distancing – to protect themselves and their communities. And with people out picnicking and barbecuing, it’s crucial to think ahead and plan for frequent hand-washing.”

Coloradans who choose to travel should check with the local public health agency at their destination to make sure they are up to date on guidelines, restrictions, and COVID-19 related rules. Those looking to explore the vast, great outdoors should check out COTREX to see what trails, trailheads, and activities are allowed on state and federal public lands – and to see which places are not crowded.

Coloradans also should take steps to prevent fires. It’s fire season, and this year Coloradans need to be especially careful, both due to high fire danger and the added risks and complexity that COVID-19 adds to the equation. The actions of all Coloradans can prevent situations where people have to evacuate their homes and firefighters and first responders have to deploy to camps. Additionally, we want to prevent air pollution from smoke, which could impact those who are at higher risk for severe illness. 

Public officials are also asking Coloradans to avoid risky behaviors this weekend to maintain our current sufficient levels of emergency response capacity for hospitals, search and rescue, and first responders.

“We really need everyone to get through this weekend with all of their fingers intact,” Bookman said. “Usually we see a lot of emergency room visits on Independence Day. Right now our hospital capacity is good, but we need people to play it safe and stay out of the hospital if you can.” Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

State provides tips for enjoying a safe Independence Day holiday