CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon update for Tuesday, August 24

Aug. 24, 2021: CDOT crews had another safe and productive day on Monday with no accidents or injuries reported. The weather did start with some light showers close to the burn scars, but they were small and fast moving, and raised no concern from the National Weather Service.  Luckily the storms cleared out by afternoon and we had good weather the rest of the day. Crews removed 21 loads of material and hauled 38 super sacks. This update includes a river operations update (see below). Work continues to include flight operations by Xcel Energy and Holy Cross Energy, so motorists should anticipate limited traffic holds so that crews can safely conduct that work.

Maintenance update

Crews from Section 5 (Denver) and Section 4 (Pueblo) mobilized home after a very helpful and productive stay. Crews with Section 2 (Grand Junction and Glenwood Canyon area) conducted work with an excavator at Mile Point (MP) 120.2 westbound pulling mud and debris from behind the wall on the north side of Interstate 70. Crews hauled out 21 loads. Crews also hauled 38 super sacks from the pit on Highway 82 to a storage location at No Name. Crews also worked on servicing equipment, both rental and CDOT equipment. Today, crews will resume work at MP 120.2 -120.8 westbound and MP 127 – 129 westbound on the east end. Crews will also work with engineering teams as the contractor replaces Triton portable barriers with concrete barriers, so that the portable barriers can be removed and returned to CDOT facilities.

Due to ongoing work by Xcel Energy and Holy Cross Energy, there was a 30 minute period when there was no power from either end of Glenwood Canyon. Hanging Lake Tunnel was able to continue operating with an emergency generator.

Xcel Energy and Holy Cross Energy will continue to conduct flight operations for repairs, which will require traffic holds.


Engineering update
Contractor partner Lawrence Construction began mobilizing to the jobsite on Monday. Lawrence will be taking over traffic control at MP 123.5 (Blue Gulch) over the next several days, replacing CDOT maintenance barriers with their own. Now that Blue Gulch stability has been confirmed, instruments will be moved from Blue Gulch to Devil’s Hole which requires satellite connectivity, so it will be a little while before that is online. Federal Highway Administration teams will visit on Tuesday.

Flash Flood Watch I-70 protocol
Maintenance crews will be stationed at the two closure points along I-70 at mile point 133 (Dotsero) and MP 116 (Glenwood Springs). This allows for a quick closure of the interstate if weather worsens. There will be a single lane closure on eastbound I-70 at MP 116 which, again, allows the opportunity to quickly close the interstate as soon as a Flash Flood Warning is issued.

Flash flood warning I-70 protocol

In the event that a flash flood warning is issued, maintenance crews at the two closure points will close the interstate. The Colorado State Patrol will sweep the area to ensure there are no motorists or members of the public in the area. Crews will continue to monitor the mudslide area. Motorists should be prepared for an extended closure should there be another mud slide or slide materials blocking the roadway that will need to be cleared before reopening. Safety is CDOT’s and CSP’s number one priority and the agencies will not reopen the interstate until it is safe to do so. 

In the event of an I-70 closure

Digital message boards will display the closure points and the recommended detour. The detour will be the same as when the canyon originally closed. CDOT will post messaging on both Facebook and Twitter and will send information to stakeholders if we anticipate an extended closure. Motorists are encouraged to check COtrip.org and the weather forecast before driving through the canyon.

Colorado State Emergency Operations Center river operations update 

The Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management is leading the efforts related to recovery of the river. DHSEM is coordinating the following efforts in Glenwood Canyon through activation of the State Recovery Task Force:

  • Determining the best course of action in regard to river reconfiguration 
  • Establishing responsibility for activities within the river and surrounding lands with the U.S. Forest Service, the Federal Transportation Administration and the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers. 
  • Examining broadband infrastructure in the canyon. No immediate hazards or weaknesses have been identified.
  • Recommending an official disaster declaration from the U.S. Small Business Administration for the Economic Injury Disaster Loan program after damage assessments show impacts to businesses.
  • Monitoring river flow through the canyon to determine if the Colorado Division of Water Resources can coordinate water rights to regulate river operations with the goal of manipulating flows in order to break up debris and move downstream.
  • A Preliminary Damage Assessment with state agencies, USFS and USACE occurred August 19 and 20, which confirmed the need for the Joint Preliminary Damage Assessments (JPDA) with FEMA. The  JPDA is necessary for a possible Stafford Act request from the Governor to the President. The JPDA is tentatively scheduled for the week of August 30th.  
  • A multi-state federal agency team conducted technical damage assessments on six debris fans into the Colorado River in the Glenwood Canyon on August 20.  Experts from these agencies assessed fan depths and widths, river backflow depths, volume capacity and river reconfiguration. Members of CDPS, CDOT, DNR, CGS, USFS and USACE participated.  
  • DHSEM is providing incident support in Glenwood Springs to the local jurisdictions, state agencies and federal partners involved in the response with a focus on:
    • Concerns about water quality / debris for water users
    • Economic impacts in tourism economies
    • Supply chain effect in multiple industries, including medical
    • Staffing effects
    • Need to prepare for future events
  • Pursuing federal funding for the response and recovery operations in Glenwood Canyon.
CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon update for Tuesday, August 24

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for August 24, 2021

The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats – 8/24/2021

Number of individuals tested: 9,559

Positive results: 1,536
Pending results: 26
New positives since 8/19/21: 11
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 60
Patients Transferred: 13
Patients Discharged: 47

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

Vaccine update: Grand River Health is offering COVID-19 vaccinations to the general public ages 12+ in our clinics in Rifle and Battlement Mesa. Please call 625-1100 (option 1) to schedule.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services and After Hours care are open. All patients will be screened appropriately

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear an ear loop mask while in the facility 

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for August 24, 2021

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats – 8/24/21:

Specimens collected thru Valley View: 32,761
Positive results: 2,354
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 297
Admitted patients discharged: 255

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing.

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon update for Friday, August 20

Colorado Department of Transportation

As of midnight on Thursday, Aug. 19 the canyon continued to experience continuous rainfall. At 10:00 p.m. on Thursday, a decision was made, barring any further weather impacts through the night, that CDOT would open the canyon Friday morning. That goal was accomplished by 5:00 a.m. on Friday after some minor material slide clean-up at mile points 120.6, 120.7 WB and 130 EB. Crews were encouraged by how well the canyon landscape weathered the rain that occured over the past 24 hours. Numerous rain gauges surrounding the canyon measured over three inches of rain that fell during that period. 

Maintenance update

Today both Section 4 (Pueblo) and Section 5 (Denver) mobilized 10 person teams consisting of tandem dump trucks and vac-trucks to oversee continued clean-up operations in the canyon. These teams consist of loader and excavator operators to relieve Section 2 personnel for the weekend. Section 2 personnel will continue to monitor flood watches and warnings for traffic control points when needed over this period.

Engineering update

  • Initial readings from the Blue Gulch wall monitors indicate stability. 
  • Two bids were received for the emergency work, United and Lawrence. Lawrence was the successful low bidder and has been issued Notice to Proceed.
  • Lawrence plans to mobilize staff immediately to begin preparations for Construction Work to begin Monday 8/23.
  • CC Enterprises will be Lawrence’s Traffic Control subcontractor.
  • Met with the ICC river group. Their site visit was cancelled on Thursday due to rain. They will attempt a site visit today.

Flash flood watch protocol

Maintenance crews will be stationed at the two closure points along I-70 at mile point 133 (Dotsero) and MP 116 (Glenwood Springs). This allows for a quick closure of the interstate if weather worsens. There will be a single lane closure on eastbound I-70 at MP 116 which, again, allows the opportunity to quickly close the interstate as soon as a Flash Flood Warning is issued.

Flash flood warning protocol

In the event that a Flash Flood Warning is issued, maintenance crews at the two closure points will close the interstate. The Colorado State Patrol will sweep the area to ensure there are no motorists or members of the public in the area. Crews will continue to monitor the mudslide area. Motorists should be prepared for an extended closure should there be another mud slide or slide materials blocking the roadway that will need to be cleared before reopening. Safety is CDOT’s and CSP’s number one priority and the agencies will not reopen the interstate until it is safe to do so. 

In the event of a closure

Digital message boards will display the closure points and the recommended detour. The detour will be the same as when the canyon originally closed. CDOT will post messaging on both Facebook and Twitter and will send information to stakeholders if we anticipate an extended closure. Motorists are encouraged to check COtrip.org and the weather forecast before driving through the canyon. 

I-70 Glenwood Canyon material slides the night of Aug. 19.
CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon update for Friday, August 20

CDPHE launches new self-report option in CO Exposure Notifications Service

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Today, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced that Coloradans have access to the latest innovation to the Exposure Notifications service -“self-report.” Self-reporting allows users to share their test results right away, including results from an at-home test, giving users another option to more quickly and conveniently report a positive COVID-19 test.  

Colorado in partnership with Google and Apple developed this feature in response to Coloradans’ requests for ways to more quickly and conveniently report positive COVID-19 cases within the Exposure Notifications service. Colorado is the first state to roll out this new feature. 

“Swift awareness and identification are key to slowing disease transmission in a time when the delta variant is so contagious. CO Exposure Notifications can alert individuals who would otherwise be unaware that they have been exposed to the virus, which is especially important for people who are asymptomatic and are unknowingly spreading the virus. The state is proud to have been a pioneer in making use of this technology, and we are thrilled to offer Coloradans and visitors a speedy and convenient option through this latest innovation to the CO Exposure Notifications service. We encourage everyone to opt-in if they have not already, and keep CO Exposure Notifications on their phones.” said COVID-19 incident commander Scott Bookman.

Currently, Colorado sends a code to all positive cases that have an accompanying phone number that are reported to CEDRS (Colorado Electronic Disease Reporting System). For thoses cases that already have Exposure Notifications enabled, they can enter the code or tap the included link and notify people they were around of a potential exposure. This process will continue. To self-report, users have the option within the Exposure Notifications service to request a verification code for their positive tests. Once a user’s phone is validated, the state sends an SMS with a verification code to submit their positive case within Exposure Notifications. The user can tap the included link and go through the proceeding steps to alert others of a potential exposure. Self-report is now available to Apple and Android users including those who currently have Exposure Notifications on their phone as well as new users.

To protect privacy, the user has full control to opt in to receive exposure notifications and can turn it off at any time. The service will never track your location — it uses Bluetooth rather than GPS. Your identity will never be revealed to anyone. The service will never collect, transmit or store any of your personal information.

For more information on CO Exposure Notifications, please visit AddYourPhone.com.  Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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El CDPHE lanza una nueva opción de autoinforme en el Servicio de notificaciones de exposición en Colorado

El Servicio de notificaciones ahora le da la opción al usuario para que pueda avisar a otros sobre una posible exposición al virus de forma rápida y conveniente

COLORADO (19 de agosto de 2021): El Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE) ha anunciado hoy que los habitantes del Estado ya tienen acceso a la última innovación del Servicio de notificaciones de exposición en Colorado: el “autoinforme”. La opción de autoinforme les permite a los usuarios compartir los resultados de sus pruebas de detección de inmediato, inclusive los resultados de una prueba casera. Gracias a esta herramienta, los usuarios cuentan con otra alternativa para reportar de manera más rápida y conveniente una prueba positiva de COVID-19. 

En colaboración con Google y Apple, Colorado ha desarrollado esta herramienta en respuesta a los pedidos de sus habitantes que desean informar de forma más rápida y cómoda los casos positivos dentro del sistema del Servicio de notificaciones. Colorado es el primer Estado en poner en marcha esta nueva modalidad de reporte.

Scott Bookman, el comandante de incidentes, hizo estas declaraciones: “La concientización y rápida detección del virus son fundamentales para frenar la transmisión de la enfermedad en momentos en que la variante delta revela un alto grado de contagiosidad. Las notificaciones sobre exposición al COVID-19 pueden servir para alertar a algunas personas que, sin esta herramienta, no se darían cuenta de que han estado expuestas al virus. Esto es de particular importancia en el caso de individuos asintomáticos que están propagando el virus sin saberlo. Colorado se enorgullece de haber sido pionero en el uso de esta tecnología, y nos gratifica poder ofrecerles tanto a los habitantes del Estado como a nuestros visitantes una opción rápida y cómoda de reportar su exposición al virus a través de esta última innovación del Servicio de notificaciones. Alentamos a todos a que se inscriban, si aún no lo ha hecho, y a que mantengan estas notificaciones activadas en sus teléfonos”.

Actualmente, Colorado envía un código a todos los casos positivos con un número de teléfono registrado y que se notifican al Sistema electrónico estatal para el reporte de enfermedades (CEDRS, por sus siglas en inglés). Aquellos que ya tienen activadas estas notificaciones pueden introducir el código o pulsar el enlace incluido y notificar a las personas con las cuales estuvieron cerca sobre una posible exposición al virus. Este procedimiento seguirá vigente. Para autoinformar, los usuarios tienen la opción (dentro del sistema del Servicio de notificaciones) de solicitar un código de verificación para sus pruebas positivas. Tras validar el teléfono del usuario, el Estado de Colorado envía un SMS con un código de verificación para presentar su caso positivo dentro del sistema del Servicio de notificaciones. El usuario puede pulsar el enlace incluido y seguir los pasos indicados para alertar a otros sobre una posible exposición al virus. El autoinforme ya está disponible para los usuarios de Apple y Android, incluidos los que ya cuentan con Notificaciones de exposición en su teléfono, así como para nuevos usuarios.

Para proteger su privacidad, el usuario tiene pleno control para optar por recibir notificaciones o desactivar esta herramienta cuando quiera. El servicio nunca rastreará su ubicación, ya que utiliza Bluetooth en lugar de GPS. Jamás se revelará su identidad a cualquier otra persona. El servicio nunca recogerá, transmitirá o almacenará ninguna información personal.

Para más información sobre el Servicio de notificaciones de exposición en Colorado, visite Add YourPhone.com.

Continúe manteniéndose informado visitando covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE launches new self-report option in CO Exposure Notifications Service

GCPH COVID-19 UPDATE: Youth vaccine rate increases to 50 percent

Garfield County Public Health

Garfield County Public Health considers the goal of vaccinating 70 percent of the county to be within reach. It will take an additional 2,028 people to get vaccinated for the county to meet this goal.

For the third week in a row, first doses of COVID vaccines administered outnumbered second doses. First doses accounted for 60 percent of the 1,130 vaccine doses received last week.

There was a 16 percent increase in first and second doses given to 12- to 15-year-olds – this age group has nearly reached the 50-percent vaccinated mark. Ninety-four percent of cases seen at local hospitals since July have been unvaccinated.

Booster, Comeback Cash, immunocompromised vaccine clinics

  • Immunocompromised individuals meeting certain criteria may attend any current public health vaccine clinic to receive their extra dose.
  • A booster dose update has been announced by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. At this time, Public Health does not have booster dose clinic dates set. Please watch the vaccine webpage for updates.
  • Comeback Cash returns to Rifle Walmart August 20 and 21. Get $100 for your COVID vaccine.

September 6 Labor Day office closure

Those due for a second dose of vaccine on September 6, please plan to attend vaccine clinics later in the week or the following week. Garfield County offices and departments are closed for the Labor Day holiday.

COVID school guidance

Public health has been working with local schools and districts on the best ways to keep staff and students safe and in-person during the 2021-2022 school year. Increasing vaccination rates remains the single most effective strategy to keeping schools open. A layered approach of masking, quarantine/isolation is also important.

COVID by the numbers:

Age                 Percent first dose     Fully
group              First dose                   vaccinated

12-15               48%                             37%
16-18               52%                             43%
19-29               59%                             50%
30-39               57%                             50%
40-49               64%                             57%
50-59               68%                             61%
60-69               80%                             75%
70-79               90%                             87%
80+                  83%                             77%

Cumulative incidence rate*:

Looking that the incidence rate over the past 7-days an unvaccinated person was nearly three times as likely to have a positive diagnosis than a vaccinated person, and that goes up to four times as likely for an unvaccinated person to have a positive diagnosis than unvaccinated in the past 14-day period.

7-day (8/7-8/13)

  • Vaccinated: 46.9 per 100,000
  • Unvaccinated: 134.9 per 100,000

14-day (7/31-8/13)

  • Vaccinated: 73.8 per 100,000
  • Unvaccinated 299.6 per 100,000

*The cumulative incidence (CI) rate is a measure of the frequency that COVID is occurring over a specific period and calculated per 100,000 people. It provides a picture of the state of the pandemic in a community.

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Aumentó la tasa de vacunación juvenil, regresa el cash returns, refuerzos en el otoño

CONDADO GARFIELD, CO – Salud Pública considera que el objetivo de vacunar al 70 por ciento del condado está al alcance, con 2,028 personas adicionales, el condado llegará a la meta.

Por tercera semana consecutiva, administración de la primera dosis de COVID superó el número a la segunda dosis.  De 1,130 dosis de vacunas administradas la semana pasada, el 60 por ciento fueron primeras dosis.   

Hubo un aumento del 16 por ciento en la primera y segunda dosis administradas a niños de 12 a 15 años. Este grupo de edad casi ha alcanzado la marca del 50 por ciento de vacunados.

El 94 por ciento de los casos atendidos en hospitales desde julio no han sido vacunados.

Refuerzo, comeback cash, clínicas de vacunas para inmunocomprometidos

  • Personas inmunocomprometidas que cumplen cierta criterio pueden acudir a cualquier clínica de vacunación de Salud Pública a recibir una dosis adicional.
  • Comeback Cash regresa a Walmart en Rifle el 20 y 21 de agosto.  Reciba $100 al recibir la vacuna de COVID. Mire los detalles aquí.

El 6 de septiembre estará cerrado Salud Pública por el Día del Trabajo

Aquellos que necesiten la segunda dosis de la vacuna el 6 de septiembre, planeen asistir a las clínicas de vacunas disponibles esa semana o próxima semana.

Orientación escolar de COVID

Salud Pública ha estado trabajando con las escuelas y distritos locales sobre la mejor manera de mantener al personal y a los estudiantes seguros y en persona durante el año escolar 2021-2022. El aumento de las tasas de vacunación sigue siendo la estrategia más eficaz para mantener abiertas las escuelas. También es importante un enfoque sobre el uso de cubrebocas y la cuarentena / aislamiento.  

Guía actual de Salud Pública del Condado Garfield para escuelas.

Orientación para padres después de un síntomas positivo de COVID-19.

COVID por números:

Grupo de        Porcentaje de            Completamente

edad                primera dosis            vacunados

12-15               48%                             37%

16-18               52%                             43%

19-29               59%                             50%

30-39               57%                             50%

40-49               64%                             57%

50-59               68%                             61%

60-69               80%                             75%

70-79               90%                             87%

80+                  83%                             77%

Tasa de incidencia acumulada:

Tomando en cuenta la tasa de incidencia durante los últimos 7 días, una persona no vacunada tiene casi tres veces más probabilidades de tener un diagnóstico positivo que una persona vacunada, y en los últimos 14 días, es cuatro veces más probable que una persona no vacunada tenga un diagnóstico positivo que una persona no vacunada.

7-días (8/7-8/13)

  • Vacunados: 46.9 por 100,000
  • No vacunados: 134.9 por 100,000

14-días (7/31-8/13)

  • Vacunados: 73.8 por 100,000
  • No vacunados 299.6 por 100,000

*La tasa de incidencia acumulada (IC) es una medida de la frecuencia con la que se produce el COVID durante un período específico y se calcula por cada 100,000 personas. Proporciona una imagen del estado de la pandemia en una comunidad.

GCPH COVID-19 UPDATE: Youth vaccine rate increases to 50 percent

CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon update for Thursday, August 19

Colorado Department of Transportation

I-70 Exit 116 (Main Glenwood Springs) closure point.
I-70 Exit 116 (Main Glenwood Springs) closure point.

CDOT Maintenance Crews stood up a weather watch at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 18. We are under a weather watch until Friday morning at 12 a.m. so crews are on standby at traffic closure points throughout the Watch. 

At 4:15 p.m. yesterday the forecast turned to a Warning so the safety protocol was implemented. Due to continued moderate rain and the forecasted amounts through this afternoon and evening the Canyon remains closed. Crews ran sweeps through the canyon last night and there were no new flows reported.

We are communicating with NOAA consistently and will be monitoring forecasts closely

Maintenance update

Wednesday was spent planning and scheduling crews to stand up for the anticipated weather watch from the National Weather Service. We are scheduled for 24 hour coverage over the next 48 hours into Friday morning.  Crews serviced and cleaned equipment from all of the use over the last few weeks.

Engineering update

The question/answer period for contractors interested in the emergency project ended at noon on Wednesday. CDOT responded to all questions received and issued a revision to the plans. Bid deadline was this morning at 9:00 a.m.

Flash flood watch protocol

Maintenance crews will be stationed at the two closure points along I-70 at mile point 133 (Dotsero) and MP 116 (Glenwood Springs). This allows for a quick closure of the interstate if weather worsens. There will be a single lane closure on eastbound I-70 at MP 116 which, again, allows the opportunity to quickly close the interstate as soon as a Flash Flood Warning is issued.

Flash flood warning protocol

In the event that a Flash Flood Warning is issued, maintenance crews at the two closure points will close the interstate. The Colorado State Patrol will sweep the area to ensure there are no motorists or members of the public in the area. Crews will continue to monitor the mudslide area. Motorists should be prepared for an extended closure should there be another mud slide or slide materials blocking the roadway that will need to be cleared before reopening. Safety is CDOT’s and CSP’s number one priority and the agencies will not reopen the interstate until it is safe to do so. 

In the event of a closure

Digital message boards will display the closure points and the recommended detour. The detour will be the same as when the canyon originally closed. CDOT will post messaging on both Facebook and Twitter and will send information to stakeholders if we anticipate an extended closure. Motorists are encouraged to check COtrip.org and the weather forecast before driving through the canyon. 

General update

?I-70 Glenwood Canyon to remain CLOSED-? CDOT is keeping I-70 in Glenwood Canyon mile point 116 (#GlenwoodSprings) to Exit 133 (Dotsero) closed at this time due to unusually large uncertainty with the forecast, including abrupt shifts this morning. The Flash Flood Watch in place now could turn into a Flash Flood Warning quickly, and the burn scar area has already received significant precipitation. While CDOT typically only closes the road at a Flash Flood Warning, we are acting out of an abundance of caution due to the rapid shifts in the weather forecast this morning, combined with this being the first major weather event since the canyon reopened. CDOT will keep the public updated throughout the day. 

This is the first big weather pattern since the most recent I-70 closure and mudslides in Glenwood Canyon, and rain gauges throughout the area have already measured over an inch of rain in several locations. While we monitor the situation during this first major weather event since the 500-year flood event in late July, CDOT is following the same standard traffic safety and detour procedures that were in place during the previous closure. 

Check COtrip.org for updates.

#KnowBeforeYouGo #WholeSystemWholeSafety #GlenwoodCanyon

CDOT: I-70 Glenwood Canyon update for Thursday, August 19

CDOT: Ongoing closure of I-70 through Glenwood Canyon due to rapid shifts in the weather forecast

Colorado Department of Transportation

The Colorado Department of Transportation closed Interstate 70 in both directions through Glenwood Canyon at mile points 133 (Dotsero) and MP 116 (Glenwood Springs) at 4:20 p.m. on Aug. 18 due to a Flash Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service. The burn scar area in Glenwood Canyon has received significant precipitation since the closure last night, though no new mudslides or damage have been reported. The closure will remain in place due to an unusually high uncertainty with the forecast, including abrupt shifts this morning. The Flash Flood Watch in place now could turn into a Flash Flood Warning quickly. 

While CDOT’s protocol for Glenwood Canyon since the mudslide in late July has been to close I-70 in the event that a Flash Flood Warning is issued, the Department will continue to keep the Canyon closed out of an abundance of caution due to rapid shifts in the weather forecast this morning, combined with this being the first major weather event since the Canyon reopened. Safety continues to be CDOT’s number one priority. 

Rain gauges throughout the area have already measured over an inch of rain in several locations. CDOT is following the same standard traffic safety and detour procedures that were in place during the previous closure. The repairs in Glenwood Canyon have held up through the weather event so far. This is the first significant rain event since the major slides occurred in late July, and CDOT is closely monitoring Glenwood Canyon to assess how the canyon responds to the rainfall and saturation. 

A traffic control point is still in place at eastbound Exit 87 (West Rifle) to guide motorists to the northern alternate route (see map below). Visitors and local traffic traveling eastbound to Glenwood Springs and destinations in the Roaring Fork Valley can continue down US 6 and enter back on eastbound I-70 at Exit 90 (Main Rifle), Exit 97 (Silt) or Exit 105 (New Castle).

CDOT crews will continue to assess the burn scar area and will determine if it is safe to reopen when the weather clears up. In the event that a new mudslide occurs or a significant amount of debris from the mudslide path blocks the interstate, the closure may become extended. Motorists should monitor COtrip.org for road closure information and continue to check the weather forecast before traveling in this area or through the mountains. 

TRAFFIC IMPACTS: 

  • Full closure of I-70 between Dotsero (MP 133) and Glenwood Springs (MP 116) – Motorists are strongly encouraged to use the recommended northern alternate route
  • Westbound motorists from the Denver metro area should exit I-70 at Exit 205 (Silverthorne) and travel north on Colorado Highway 9 towards Kremmling. Travelers will continue west on US Highway 40 and then south on CO 13 to complete the alternate route and return to westbound I-70 at Rifle (Exit 90).

o   Eastbound travelers can detour using the same route in reverse. 

CDOT: Ongoing closure of I-70 through Glenwood Canyon due to rapid shifts in the weather forecast

NWS: Flash flood warning issued for the Grizzly Creek burn area in Glenwood Canyon – Interstate 70 closed

Garco 911

Aug. 18, 2021, 6:31 p.m. – Hwy 6 is open between mile-markers 92 to the 99 both directions, Rifle to Silt.

Aug. 18, 2021, 5:25 p.m. – Hwy 6 is closed between mile-markers 92 to the 99 both directions, Rifle to Silt, due to an accident.

Colorado Department of Transportation

Aug. 18, 2021, 4:44 p.m. – The Colorado Department of Transportation has closed Interstate 70 in both directions through Glenwood Canyon at mile points 133 (Dotsero) and MP 116 (Glenwood Springs) due to a Flash Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service at 4:20 p.m. today, Wednesday, Aug. 18. The Flash Flood Warning is in effect until this evening. Motorists should plan on Glenwood Canyon being closed through the remainder of the Flash Flood Warning.

A traffic control point is in place at eastbound Exit 87 (West Rifle) to guide motorists to the northern alternate route (see map below).Visitors and local traffic traveling eastbound to Glenwood Springs and destinations in the Roaring Fork Valley can continue down US 6 and enter back on eastbound I-70 at Exit 90 (Main Rifle), Exit 97 (Silt) or Exit 105 (New Castle).

CDOT crews will continue to assess the burn scar area and will determine if it is safe to reopen when the Warning is lifted. In the event that a new mudslide occurs or a significant amount of debris from the mudslide path blocks the interstate, the closure may be extended past the Flash Flood Warning being lifted. Motorists should monitor COtrip.org for road closure information and continue to check the weather forecast before traveling in this area or through the mountains. 

TRAFFIC IMPACTS: 

  • Full closure of I-70 between Dotsero (MP 133) and Glenwood Springs (MP 116) – Motorists are strongly encouraged to use the recommended northern alternate route
    • Westbound motorists from the Denver metro area should exit I-70 at Exit 205 (Silverthorne) and travel north on Colorado Highway 9 towards Kremmling. Travelers will continue west on US Highway 40 and then south on CO 13 to complete the alternate route and return to westbound I-70 at Rifle (Exit 90).
  • Eastbound travelers can detour using the same route in reverse. 

ENCOUNTERING INCLEMENT WEATHER

Heavy rains and summer storms can lead to challenging driving conditions. Colorado highways, particularly those in mountainous areas, can be vulnerable to the impacts of weather and the natural environment. It is important that the traveling public be aware of summer weather conditions and forecasts. Just as motorists prepare for driving in the winter time, during summer months, travelers should also be ready for heavy rain storms, hail storms and what can potentially occur after those storms – flooding, mudslides and falling rocks.

WHY CLOSURES ARE NEEDED

The safety of motorists is vital. When CDOT and the Colorado State Patrol determine that a road must be closed, the decision is made to protect everyone including motorists and response crews. The need for some closures is obvious – mudslides cover the highway, large boulders tumble onto the road, or a severe vehicle crash occurs. 

If you are stuck in a closure waiting for a road to be cleared of mud or rocks, do not leave your car unless absolutely necessary. Never hang out in the grassy median located between lanes. If traffic is moving in the opposite direction, the median can be a hazardous area. Emergency response vehicles and heavy equipment may also need the median area to move about and access the emergency scene.

BE PREPARED

Highway closures can last for as little as a few minutes or for as long as several hours. When drivers set out on a trip, especially through high country roads or the I-70 mountain corridor, it would be wise to have the car supplied with an emergency kit. The kit should contain at the very minimum: water, snacks, flashlight, and a blanket. Remember to also carry water for your pets if you’re traveling with animals. You may even consider packing some items to keep you or children occupied while waiting in the car. Activity books, colored pencils or a deck of cards can help pass the time.

DRIVER SAFETY

Heavy rains can cause flooding, mudslides and rock falls in regions downstream and on roadways adjacent to canyons, steep slopes or cliff walls. While I-70 through Glenwood Canyon will close well before there is a potential for flooding on the highway, motorists may drive up onto a flooded area on other mountainous roads and should follow the several precautions listed below:

  • Never drive through any flooded area, you do not know how deep or how fast the water is running.
  • Even 8-10 inches of water can float an average-sized car, which can be easily swept off the road.
  • Driving too fast on wet roads or in flooded areas can cause a vehicle to hydroplane. Never use your cruise control during rainy conditions with standing water on the roadway.
  • Any amount of flooding or mud can obstruct the roadway and hinder drivers from knowing exactly where to drive. If you cannot see the roadway, be smart and wait for the water to subside.
  • Water and mud can contain unknown hazards hidden under the surface – rocks or other debris, like plant material and tree branches.

Garfield County Emergency Communications Authority

Aug. 18, 2021, 4:32 p.m. – Interstate 70 is closed between mile markers 133 and 87 in both directions, Dotsero to West Rifle, due to a flash flood warning.

National Weather Service

Aug. 18, 2021, 4:20 p.m. – The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has issued a flash flood warning for the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area in Western Eagle County in west central Colorado and East Central Garfield County in west central Colorado until 7:15 p.m. MDT. Interstate 70 is closed in Glenwood Canyon during the flash flood warning.

At 4:20 p.m. MDT, Doppler radar indicated thunderstorms producing heavy rain over the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. The expected rainfall rate is 0.7 to 1 inch in 1 hour. Flash flooding is ongoing or expected to begin shortly.

Excessive rainfall over the burn scar will result in debris flow moving through the Glenwood Canyon area. The debris flow can consist of rock, mud, vegetation and other loose materials.

HAZARD: Life threatening flash flooding. Thunderstorms producing flash flooding in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area.

SOURCE: Radar.

IMPACT: Life threatening flash flooding of areas in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. Some locations that will experience flash flooding include Glenwood Springs and Shoshone.

FLASH FLOOD: RADAR INDICATED

FLASH FLOOD DAMAGE THREAT: CONSIDERABLE

EXPECTED RAINFALL: 0.7-1 INCH IN 1 HOUR

Instructions: This is a life threatening situation. Heavy rainfall will cause extensive and severe flash flooding of creeks, streams and ditches in the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. Severe debris flows can also be anticipated across roads. Roads and driveways may be washed away in places. If you encounter flood waters, climb to safety. Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood deaths occur in vehicles.

NWS: Flash flood warning issued for the Grizzly Creek burn area in Glenwood Canyon – Interstate 70 closed

CDOT: Glenwood Canyon update on federal assistance requested by the State of Colorado

Colorado Department of Transportation

Today, the State of Colorado provided an update to communities impacted by the devastating mudslides in Glenwood Canyon, including but not limited to those areas that were severely impacted by burn scars from last year’s Grizzly Creek Fire.  Specifically, a letter was distributed to the Colorado Congressional Delegation and county commissioners/mayors with Garfield County, Eagle County, Pitkin County, Mesa County, City of Glenwood Springs, City of Grand Junction.

The stakeholder letter outlined the priorities and the state’s progress towards maximizing federal funding to support Colorado and the Western Slope. 

The federal funding requests currently include:

  • Federal Highway Administration – Emergency Relief Program Support
  • Stafford Act Support 

Our total initial request to the FHWA Emergency Relief (ER) program, subject to ongoing assessment of damages, recovery, and resiliency needs that will supplement and refine initial estimates, totals $116 million. Within 24 hours of receiving that letter, the Federal Highway Administration approved the quick-release request for $11.6 million.We are already putting those dollars to use for critical expenses like reimbursements for the emergency work to reopen the roadway last weekend, as well as for getting started with more permanent repairs to the roadway and as the situation unfolds we will provide a plan for alternative routes.

The damage assessment for non-roadway impacts is ongoing, and this assessment process is a detailed interagency effort that takes some time.  At this time, we are exploring several areas for pursuit of support pursuant to the Stafford Act.  These may include, but are not limited to: 

  • Damage to the Colorado River: Areas of the Colorado River are covered by immense debris and material that have impacted the flow of the River.  To that end, the Department of Public Safety, working together with the Department of Natural Resources, local river districts, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, FEMA, and others are assessing options for clearing debris and material in a manner that will restore river flow in a manner that protects the critical infrastructure in the canyon.   
  • Damage on both sides of the river including the burn scar area above the roadway: Much of the burn scar is within the U.S. Forest Service jurisdiction on land far above I-70.  The forest service is exploring all options, including areas that may require additional rockfall mitigation and support accelerate revegetation where possible.
  • Fixing the Hanging Lake Trail: Hanging Lake Trail has incurred serious damage due to this event. We will ask the federal government to explore all options available to pay for this work to occur as expeditiously as possible.    
  • Support to individuals and small businesses: The Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management is working with the U.S. Small Business Administration to implement the Economic Injury Disaster Loans program.  
  • Regulatory flexibility: The Stafford Act declaration can provide short term regulatory flexibility options that may be warranted with respect to supply chain issues.
CDOT: Glenwood Canyon update on federal assistance requested by the State of Colorado