CDOT: Precipitation in Grizzly Creek burn area caused mudslides in Glenwood Canyon

Colorado Department of Transportation

July 21, 6 am – UPDATE: I-70 in Glenwood Canyon is closed at Exit 87 (West Rifle), Exit (109) (Canyon Creek), Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs) and Exit 133 (Dotsero), due to mud and rocks on roadway near the Grizzly Creek burn scar. Local eastbound traffic on I-70 is allowed east of Exit 109 to access Glenwood Springs and the Highway 82 corridor, but motorists should expect delays. Safety closure between Exit 87 – US 6; Rifle and Exit 133 – Dotsero.

CDOT asks that motorists use the recommended northern alternate route when detouring around the closure. Westbound motorists from the Denver metro area should exit I-70 at Exit 205 (Silverthorne) and travel north on Colorado Highway 9 towards Kremmling. Travelers will continue west on US Highway 40 and then south on CO 13 to complete the alternate route and return to westbound I-70 at Rifle (Exit 90). Eastbound travelers can detour using the same route in reverse.

July 20, 11:03 pm – UPDATE: CDOT crews are monitoring and assessing several mudslides on I-70 in Glenwood Canyon. Safety is the top priority tonight, and crews will begin clean up once it is safe to do so. All interstate closure status updates will be posted at cotrip.org and 511. CDOT social media channels and this feed may not be updated overnight.

National Weather Service

July 20, 10:20 pm
Event: Flash Flood Warning alert:

NWS Flash Flood Warning extended alert

The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has extended the
* Flash Flood Warning for…the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area in…western Eagle County in west central Colorado… East Central Garfield County in west central Colorado…
* Until 11:30 PM MDT.
* At 10:20 PM MDT, Doppler radar indicated thunderstorms producing heavy rain over the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. The expected rainfall rate is 0.2 to 0.5 inches in 1 hour. Additional rainfall amounts of 0.2 to 0.5 inches are possible in the warned area. Flash flooding is ongoing or expected to begin shortly.

Excessive rainfall over the burn scar will result in debris flow moving through the Glenwood Canyon area. The debris flow can consist of rock, mud, vegetation and other loose materials.

HAZARD…Life threatening flash flooding. Thunderstorms producing flash flooding in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area.
SOURCE…CDOT has reported multiple mudslides over I-70 and additional rain is developing around the area.
IMPACT…Life threatening flash flooding of areas in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area.
* Some locations that will experience flash flooding include… Glenwood Springs and Shoshone.

FLASH FLOOD…RADAR INDICATED FLASH FLOOD DAMAGE THREAT…CONSIDERABLE EXPECTED RAINFALL…0.2-0.5 INCHES IN 1 HOUR

Instructions:This is a life threatening situation. Heavy rainfall will cause extensive and severe flash flooding of creeks…streams…and ditches in the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. Severe debris flows can also be anticipated across roads. Roads and driveways may be washed away in places. If you encounter flood waters…climb to safety. Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood deaths occur in vehicles.

Colorado Department of Transportation

July 20; 9:06 pm: I-70 Glenwood Canyon CLOSED – 8:45 PM (7/20) – I-70 in Glenwood Canyon is closing due to a Flash Flood Warning for the Grizzly Creek burn scar area. **Updates will continue to be posted to cotrip.org, CDOT’s Twitter page and available by dialing 511.**

Closure points for all traffic are Exit 133 (Dotsero), Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs), Exit 109 (Canyon Creek) and Exit 87 (West Rifle). The I-70 closure will stay in place through the Warning and then crews will review whether the canyon is safe to reopen. At this time the Flash Flood Warning is anticipated to end at 10:30 pm. Eastbound traffic headed to the Roaring Fork Valley may have limited access at Exit 109 or on US 6, but should plan for delays during the first hour of the closure.

CDOT asks that motorists use the recommended northern alternate route when detouring around the closure. Westbound motorists from the Denver metro area should exit I-70 at Exit 205 (Silverthorne) and travel north on Colorado Highway 9 towards Kremmling. Travelers will continue west on US Highway 40 and then south on CO 13 to complete the alternate route and return to westbound I-70 at Rifle (Exit 90). Eastbound travelers can detour using the same route in reverse.

July 20; 8:58 pm: I-70 Glenwood Canyon CLOSED due to a Flash Flood Warning for the Grizzly Creek burn scar area. CDOT updates will continue to be posted to cotrip.org and are available by dialing 511. Closure points are Exit 133, Exit 116, Exit 109 and Exit 87 (West Rifle).

Garco911

July 20; 9:04 pm: The existing closure on I-70 has been moved from mile-marker 116 eastbound, Glenwood Springs, to mile-marker 87, West Rifle. Local traffic can get through. Non-local traffic should divert to Hwy 13 for detour.

July 20; 8:48 pm: I-70 is closed between mile markers 116 and 131 both directions, Glenwood Springs and Dotsero, due to a flash flood warning.

National Weather Service

Event: Flash Flood Warning alert
July 20, 8:36 pm
The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has issued a
* Flash Flood Warning for… The Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area in… Western Eagle County in west central Colorado… East Central Garfield County in west central Colorado…

Flash Flood Warning on NWS

* Until 10:30 PM MDT
* At 8:36 PM MDT, Doppler radar indicated thunderstorms producing heavy rain over the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. The expected rainfall rate is 0.2 to 0.5 inches in 1 hour. Additional rainfall amounts of 0.2 to 0.5 inches are possible in the warned area.
Flash flooding is ongoing or expected to begin shortly. Excessive rainfall over the burn scar will result in debris flow moving through the Glenwood Canyon area. The debris flow can consist of rock, mud, vegetation and other loose materials.
HAZARD…Life threatening flash flooding. Thunderstorms producing flash flooding in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. SOURCE…Radar.
IMPACT…Life threatening flash flooding of areas in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area.

* Some locations that will experience flash flooding include… Glenwood Springs and Shoshone.

FLASH FLOOD…RADAR INDICATED FLASH FLOOD DAMAGE THREAT…CONSIDERABLE EXPECTED RAINFALL…0.2-0.5 INCHES IN 1 HOUR.

Instructions:This is a life threatening situation. Heavy rainfall will cause extensive and severe flash flooding of creeks…streams…and ditches in the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. Severe debris flows can also be anticipated across roads. Roads and driveways may be washed away in places. If you encounter flood waters…climb to safety. Turn around, don`t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood deaths occur in vehicles.

Colorado Department of Transportation

July 20, 2021, 12:53 p.m.: Rest areas and the recreation path are closed along I-70, east and west bound lanes, at Grizzly Creek (mile marker 121) and Shoshone (mm123) due to forecast precipitation over the Grizzly Creek burn scar.

National Weather Service

July 20, 2021, 12:37 p.m.: A flash flood watch is in effect for the Grizzly Creek burn area in Glenwood Canyon until 9 p.m. this evening. The watch covers the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area in portions of northwest Colorado and west central Colorado, including the following areas: in northwest Colorado, the Flat Tops Wilderness; in west central
Colorado, Central Colorado River Basin and Gore and Elk mountains/Central Mountain valleys.

National Weather Service meteorologists are forecasting possible heavy rainfall over the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area, which may lead to flash flooding and debris flows.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

CDOT: Precipitation in Grizzly Creek burn area caused mudslides in Glenwood Canyon

I-70 open both directions in Glenwood Canyon; flash flood warning for the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area expired

Garco911

July 14, 8:30 p.m. – I-70 is open between mile-markers 87 and 133 both directions, West Rifle Exit and Dotsero.

Colorado Department of Transportation

July 14, 8:31 p.m. – UPDATE: Crews are reopening I-70 in Glenwood Canyon. The road is clear of mud and water and the Flash Flood Watch has ended. All updates will continue to be available at cotrip.org and 511.

July 14, 6:09 p.m. UPDATE: a SAFETY CLOSURE continues to be in place for I-70 in Glenwood Canyon due to potential for flash flooding. All updates will continue to be posted to cotrip.org and are available by dialing 511. As the closure continues due to weather, crews are cleaning two shallow mudslides at mile Point 128 due to rain on the Grizzly Creek burn scar. The slides were 1-3 inches of very slick mud. See cotrip.org for road closure status.

July 14, 4:16 p.m.: UPDATE I-70 – Glenwood Canyon: local motorists traveling east on I-70 are encouraged to wait 30 minutes to an hour before trying to travel east from Exit 109 (Canyon Creek). Crews must first focus on clearing I-70 in Glenwood Canyon.

July 14, 3:45 p.m.: I-70 in Glenwood Canyon is closing due to potential for flash flooding from the Grizzly Creek burn scar area. All updates will continue to be posted to cotrip.org, CDOT’s Twitter page and available by dialing 511.

Closure points for all traffic will be between Exit 133 (Dotsero) and Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs). Closure points for eastbound traffic are also going into place at Exit 87 (West Rifle) and possibly Exit 109 (Canyon Creek). CDOT asks that motorists use the recommended northern alternate route when detouring around the closure. Westbound motorists from the Denver metro area should exit I-70 at Exit 205 (Silverthorne) and travel north on Colorado Highway 9 towards Kremmling. Travelers will continue west on US Highway 40 and then south on CO 13 to complete the alternate route and return to westbound I-70 at Rifle (Exit 90). Eastbound travelers can detour using the same route in reverse.

GarCo911

July 14, 3:43 p.m.: I-70 is closed between mile markers 116 and 133 in both directions, main Glenwood exit and Dotsero, due to a flash flood warning.

National Weather Service

July 14, 3:35 p.m.: The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has issued a Flash Flood Warning for The Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area in Western Eagle County in west central Colorado… East Central Garfield County in west central Colorado until 5:30 p.m. MDT.

At 3:35 PM MDT, Doppler radar indicated thunderstorms producing heavy rain over the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. Flash flooding is ongoing or expected to begin shortly. Excessive rainfall over the burn scar will result in debris flow moving through the Glenwood Canyon area. The debris flow can consist of rock, mud, vegetation and other loose materials.

HAZARD: Life-threatening flash flooding. Thunderstorms producing flash flooding in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area.

SOURCE: Radar.

IMPACT: Life-threatening flash flooding of areas in and around the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area.

Some locations that will experience flash flooding include Glenwood Springs and Shoshone.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS: This is a life threatening situation. Heavy rainfall will cause extensive and severe flash flooding of creeks…streams…and ditches in the Grizzly Creek Fire Burn Area. Severe debris flows can also be anticipated across roads. Roads and driveways may be washed away in places. If you encounter flood waters…climb to safety. Turn around, don’t drown when encountering flooded roads. Most flood deaths occur in vehicles.

FLASH FLOOD…RADAR INDICATED; FLASH FLOOD DAMAGE THREAT…CONSIDERABLE

Sent from my electronic leash.

July 14, 2:09 p.m.: A flash flood watch for the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area is in effect until 8 p.m. MDT this evening. The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has expanded the flash flood watch to include portions of northwest and west central Colorado, including the following areas: in northwest Colorado, the Flat Tops Wilderness; in west central Colorado: Central Colorado River Basin and Gore and Elk Mountains/Central Mountain valleys.

National Weather Service meteorologists are monitoring the possibility for heavy rainfall over the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area, which may lead to flash flooding and debris flows.

Precautionary/preparedness actions:

Monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

I-70 open both directions in Glenwood Canyon; flash flood warning for the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area expired

CDOT: Safety closure in place for I-70 Glenwood Canyon due to high potential of flash flooding

The National Weather Service issues Flash Flood Warning for the Grizzly Creek burn area

STATEWIDE – CDOT is putting a safety closure in place for Interstate 70 in Glenwood Canyon due to a Flash Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service. Closure points for westbound traffic will be Exit 133 (Dotsero) to Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs). Closure points for eastbound traffic will be from Exit 87 (West Rifle) to Exit 109 (Canyon Creek). The safety closure is in place to protect motorists from the potential of flash floods, mudslides, rockfall or other hazards that can be triggered by heavy rains at the location of Grizzly Creek burn scar area. The closure will remain in place through the duration of the Flash Flood Warning, which is forecast to end at 5:00 p.m. tonight. If a debris flow or mudslide occurs, motorists should be aware that I-70 will be closed for a longer period of time to allow maintenance crews to clear the highway.

Motorists can either seek the northern alternate route via Steamboat Springs or they may wait out the Flash Flood Warning and safety closure. Motorists who decide to wait out the closure MUST wait at a location off I-70, and will NOT be allowed to wait on the roadway.

If detouring, CDOT asks that motorists use the northern alternate route. Westbound motorists from the Denver metro area should plan on traveling on the northern recommended alternate route by exiting I-70 at Exit 205 (Silverthorne) and traveling north on Colorado Highway 9 towards Kremmling or by exiting I-70 at Exit 157 (Wolcott) and traveling north on Colorado Highway 131 towards Steamboat Springs. Travelers will then continue west on US Highway 40 and then south on CO 13 to complete the alternate route and return to westbound I-70 at Rifle (Exit 90). Motorists traveling eastbound from Utah or Grand Junction can reach the Denver Metro area by traveling the route above in reverse.

The alternate route will require approximately 2.5 hours additional travel time to reach your destination, compared to traveling on I-70 through Glenwood Canyon. By traveling on the recommended alternate route, motorists can avoid major delays caused by rough roads and other hazards. Before detouring onto any alternate route, motorists should refer to www.cotrip.org for the latest road conditions.

Motorists are asked to not use smartphone navigation apps to look for alternate routes. There are many auxiliary roads such as Cottonwood Pass, Hagerman Pass and Eagle/Thomasville Road that are not passable and do not have cell service. Cottonwood Pass is restricted to local traffic only.


Encountering inclement weather

If you are stuck in a closure waiting for a road to be cleared of mud or rocks, do not leave your car unless absolutely necessary. Never hang out in the grassy median located between lanes. If traffic is moving in the opposite direction, the median can be a hazardous area. Emergency response vehicles and heavy equipment may also need the median area to move about and access the emergency scene.

Lengthy closures on the interstate may also be the result of staged releases. As stopped traffic backs up, creating long lines, traffic will be let go in stages, allowing traffic queues ahead to clear, before releasing more traffic. 

Be prepared 

Highway closures can last for as little as a few minutes or for as long as several hours. When drivers set out on a trip, especially through high country roads or the I-70 mountain corridor, it is wise to have the car supplied with an emergency kit. The kit should contain at the very minimum: water, snacks, flashlight, and a blanket. Remember to also carry water for your pets if you’re traveling with animals. You may even consider packing some items to keep you or children occupied while waiting in the car. Activity books, colored pencils or a deck of cards can help pass the time.   

Driver safety 

When motorists drive up onto a flooded area, there are several precautions to follow.  

  • Never drive through any flooded area, you do not know how deep or how fast the water is running. 
  • Even 8-10 inches of water can float an average-sized car, which can be easily swept off the road. 
  • Driving too fast on wet roads or in flooded areas can cause a vehicle to hydroplane. Never use your cruise control during rainy conditions with standing water on the roadway.
  • Any amount of flooding or mud can obstruct the roadway and hinder drivers from knowing exactly where to drive. If you cannot see the roadway, be smart and wait for the water to subside. 
  • Water and mud can contain unknown hazards hidden under the surface – rocks or other debris, like plant material and tree branches.

Know before you go

Travelers are urged to “know before you go.” Gather information about weather forecasts, anticipated travel impacts, and current road conditions prior to hitting the road. CDOT resources include:

A map of the alternate route during Glenwood Canyon closure.
CDOT: Safety closure in place for I-70 Glenwood Canyon due to high potential of flash flooding

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for July 13, 2021

RIFLE, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats – 7/13/2021

Number of individuals tested: 8,942
Positive results: 1,447
Pending results: 14
New positives since 7/6/21: 26
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 57
Patients transferred: 13
Patients discharged: 44

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

Vaccine Update: Grand River Health is offering COVID-19 vaccinations to the general public ages 12+ in our clinics in Rifle and Battlement Mesa. Please call 625-1100 (option 1) to schedule.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services and afterhours care are open. All patients will be screened appropriately

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear an ear loop mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for July 13, 2021

CDPHE: Air quality health advisory for wildfire smoke

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Affected Area:  Routt, Jackson, Grand, Garfield, Eagle, Summit, Mesa, Delta, Gunnison, Pitkin, Lake, Delta, Montrose, and Gunnison Counties. Locations include, but are not limited to Glen Eden, Clark, Steamboat Springs, Kremmling, Granby, Glenwood Springs, Eagle, Breckenridge, Grand Junction, Aspen, Leadville, Delta, and Gunnison.

Advisory in Effect: 7 a.m. MDT, Monday, July 12, 2021 to 9 a.m. MDT, Tuesday, July 13, 2021.

Public Health Recommendations: If smoke is thick or becomes thick in your neighborhood you may want to remain indoors.  This is especially true for those with heart disease, respiratory illnesses, the very young, and the elderly.  Consider limiting outdoor activity when moderate to heavy smoke is present.  Consider relocating temporarily if smoke is present indoors and is making you ill.  If visibility is less than 5 miles in smoke in your neighborhood, smoke has reached levels that are unhealthy.

Outlook: Areas of moderate to heavy smoke have been observed Monday morning across the advisory area, particularly for northern Routt County in close vicinity to the Morgan Creek wildfire. Smoke will gradually decrease late Monday morning for most areas as atmospheric mixing increases, however smoke could increase again during the mid to late afternoon hours as the fire becomes more active and smoke transported from out-of-state wildfires begins to increase again.   By late Monday evening, smoke will begin to drain to lower elevations surrounding the Morgan Creek wildfire bringing periods of heavy smoke to areas along Morgan and Reed Creeks, the Elk River Valley, and eventually impacting the communities of Glen Eden and Clark through early Tuesday morning. Additionally, smoke will begin to settle Monday night across the remainder of the advisory area from out-of-state wildfires, with the heaviest smoke impacts expected for valley locations.

For the latest smoke outlook, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/addendum.aspx#smoke

For more information about smoke and your health, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/wildfire.aspx

For the latest Colorado statewide air quality conditions, forecasts, and advisories, visit:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/colorado_summary.aspx

______________________________________________________________________________________

Aviso de calidad del aire para humo proveniente de incendios forestales

Expedido para de Áreas extensas del norte y el centro de Colorado
Expedido en 8:00 AM MDT, lunes 12 de julio
Expedido por el Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado

Áreas cubiertas: condados de Routt, Jackson, Grand, Garfield, Eagle, Summit, Mesa, Delta, Gunnison,
Pitkin, Lake, Delta, Montrose, y Gunnison. Las ciudades y puntos de interés incluyen, entre otros Glen
Eden, Clark, Steamboat Springs, Kremmling, Granby, Glenwood Springs, Eagle, Breckenridge, Grand
Junction, Aspen, Leadville, Delta, and Gunnison.

Aviso en vigor: 8:30 AM MDT, lunes 12 de julio, 2021 a 9:00 AM MDT, martes, 13 de julio, 2021.

Recomendaciones de salud pública: Si el humo es denso o se vuelve denso en su vecindario, es
posible que desee permanecer en áreas cerradas, especialmente quienes padecen enfermedades
cardíacas, respiratorias, los más jóvenes y los ancianos. Considere la posibilidad de limitar las
actividades al aire libre cuando haya humo moderado o intenso. Considere la posibilidad de moverse de
lugar temporalmente si hay humo en áreas interiores y le hace sentir mal. Si la visibilidad es inferior a
5 millas [aproximadamente 8 km] debido al humo en su vecindario, éste ha alcanzado niveles que
no son saludables.

Pronóstico: El lunes por la mañana se observaron áreas con humo de moderado a denso en el área de
advertencia, particularmente en el norte del Condado de Routt, en las cercanías del incendio forestal de
Morgan Creek. El humo disminuirá gradualmente a última hora de la mañana del lunes en la mayoría de
las áreas afectadas a medida que se mezcle más con la atmósfera; sin embargo, el humo podría
aumentar nuevamente a última hora de la tarde cuando el fuego se intensifique y el humo transportado
desde los incendios forestales fuera del estado vuelva a incrementarse. A última hora de la noche del
lunes, el humo comenzará a trasladarse hacia las zonas más bajas que rodean el incendio forestal de
Morgan Creek, lo que generará períodos de humo denso a lo largo las zonas de Morgan y Reed Creeks,
Elk River Valley y, finalmente, afectará a las comunidades de Glen Eden y Clark hasta la madrugada del
martes. Además, el humo comenzará a asentarse el lunes por la noche en el resto del área de
advertencia de incendios forestales fuera del estado, y se espera la llegada de humo más denso en las
zonas de los valles.

Para conocer el pronóstico más reciente sobre el humo, visite:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/addendum.aspx#smoke
Para más información sobre el humo y su salud, visite:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/wildfire.aspx
Para conocer la información, los pronósticos y los avisos más recientes sobre las condiciones de la calidad del aire en todo el estado de Colorado, visite:
http://www.colorado.gov/airquality/colorado_summary.aspx

CDPHE: Air quality health advisory for wildfire smoke

NWS: Flash flood watch cancelled for Glenwood Canyon

National Weather Service

July 8, 5:55 p.m. – EVENT CANCELLED: Flash Flood Watch from 7/8/2021 for Glenwood Canyon.

Colorado Department of Transportation

July 8, 6:18 p.m. – UPDATE – REST AREAS AND RECREATION PATH CLOSED: I-70 eastbound / westbound Grizzly Creek mile marker 121 and Shoshone mile marker 123 will remain closed overnight.

July 8, 4:15 p.m. Rest areas and Glenwood Canyon recreation path closed: I-70 eastbound and westbound rest areas are closed at Grizzly Creek mile marker 121, and Shoshone mile marker 123, due to forecasted precipitation over the Grizzly Creek burn scar.

National Weather Service

July 8, 2021, 4:04 p.m. – The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has issued a flash flood watch for the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area until 6 p.m. MDT this evening in portions of northwest Colorado and west central Colorado, including the following areas: in northwest Colorado, Flat Tops Wilderness; in west central Colorado, Central Colorado River Basin and Gore and Elk Mountains/Central Mountain valleys.

National Weather Service Meteorologists are monitoring the potential for heavy rainfall over the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area that may lead to flash flooding and debris flows.

Precautionary/preparedness actions

Monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

NWS: Flash flood watch cancelled for Glenwood Canyon

CDPHE: SARS-CoV-2 hospitalizations continue to decline statewide

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and the Colorado School of Public Health released the most recent statewide modeling report showing the state’s SARS-CoV-2 epidemic is declining. The effective reproduction number for SARS-CoV-2 statewide is below one at 0.77, indicating that SARS-CoV-2 infections are still occurring but at a decreasing transmission rate. Currently, 1 in 390 Coloradans are estimated to be infected.

There are large differences in estimated immunity and in vaccination uptake across the state. Regions of the state with higher vaccination rates have fewer SARS-CoV-2 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths. There are large differences in vaccine uptake around the state. The modeling team anticipates that regions of Colorado with low vaccination rates at present will be areas of concern in the months ahead. 

Based on the recent increase in the Delta variant in the state, the modeling team estimates that approximately 90% of cases could be due to the highly infectious variant strain. The more transmissible Delta variant poses the greatest risk to unvaccinated Coloradans.

The modeling report estimates that 52% of the total population of Colorado is immune. The percentage of the entire population that is vaccinated includes both those eligible and those not eligible (right now, children under 12 years of age are not eligible to be vaccinated). This estimate accounts for estimated prior infections, vaccine doses, and vaccine efficacy. The percent of people vaccinated used in the modeling report includes anyone who has received at least one dose of vaccine through June 27. In order to determine immunity levels from vaccination alone, those doses are weighted on overall vaccine efficacy and whether the fullest immunity possible has been achieved based on time elapsed since vaccination. As of the morning of July 6, 70.25% of Colordans 18+ have received one or more doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. 

The latest modeling provides projections based on COVID-19 hospital census data through June 28 and vaccination data through June 27, 2021. 

The Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) assembled the expert group that works with the state on modeling projections. The group includes modeling scientists at the ColoradoSPH and the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, as well as experts from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of Colorado Denver, and Colorado State University. The models are based on Colorado data and incorporate assumptions reflecting the current state of the science.

All previous modeling reports are available on the Colorado School of Public Health’s COVID-19 website. 

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: SARS-CoV-2 hospitalizations continue to decline statewide

Governor Polis ends COVID-19 health emergency order

DENVER – Today, Governor Polis ended the Health Emergency Executive Orders for COVID-19 and rescinded all previous executive orders issued due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and signed a recovery executive order to focusing only on those measures related to the state’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic emergency, focusing Colorado’s efforts on building back stronger from the COVID-19 global pandemic.

“This has been a challenging year for our state and country. We’ve experienced pain and loss but through it all, Coloradans did their part, made good choices by wearing masks, socially distancing, and sacrificing moments with loved ones, and we succeeded in having one of the lowest COVID fatality rates in the nation,” said Governor Jared Polis. “We have been supportive of empowering individuals to make the best decisions for themselves and their families and been guided by science every step of the way over this rocky ground. And while we have reached a milestone with over 70% of our state receiving the safe and effective COVID-19 vaccine, we must remain vigilant. Today, thanks to the decisions and resilience of Coloradans, our economy is roaring back and we are taking the next bold step to ensure Colorado is building back stronger than before.”

More than 70 % of adult Coloradans have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine, marking a milestone in the state’s efforts to end the pandemic. The State is focused on ensuring that every Coloradan who wants a vaccine will get a vaccine. Coloradans must remain vigilant against COVID variants and the state is managing the response to these challenges in partnership with local public health.   Colorado has the 10th lowest fatality rate per capita of every state in the nation.

Governor Polis addressed Coloradans directly about this new executive action in a video message.

Today, Governor Polis and Colorado’s team of experts believe Coloradans – thanks to the tireless efforts of countless Coloradans to beat back this virus – are ready to take the next step forward. Governor Polis and the administration are re-focusing the state’s pandemic response to prioritize increasing vaccine uptake and economic recovery efforts. That means getting Coloradans back to work sooner and allowing our state to recover faster. This Executive Order ensures Colorado can continue getting the life-saving and safe vaccine into arms, secures resources to effectively treat COVID patients, and continues access to federal resources as our economy builds back stronger than before. It also means rescinding provisions in prior Executive Orders that are no longer needed.

“The State has made tremendous progress in terms of containing and treating infection and distributing the COVID-19 vaccine. Over seventy percent of adults have now received at least one dose of the lifesaving COVID-19 vaccine, and we are beginning to see life return to a new normal. I am therefore rescinding all previous Executive Orders issued due to COVID-19 and amending and restating this executive order to focus only on those measures related to the State’s recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic emergency,” the executive order reads.

Governor Polis ends COVID-19 health emergency order

Governor: 70 percent of Colorado adults have received at least one dose of the life-saving COVID-19 vaccine

Colorado ahead of President Joe Biden’s aspirational goal of vaccinating 70% of Americans aged 18 & up by Independence Day

DENVER – Governor Jared Polis announced today that 70.04% of Colorado adults have received at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine and the state has met President Joe Biden’s aspirational goal of vaccinating 70% of Americans aged 18 and up by July 4th. 

“I am excited that our state has reached the goal of 70% of adults with at least their first vaccination by Independence Day. This is an exciting milestone for the people of our state, it is a testament to our resilience and united commitment in the fight against this deadly virus. The vaccine is a safe and effective way to protect ourselves and enjoy the life we love in Colorado,” said Governor Polis. “Our country has a simple tool to stop the loss in the form of a safe, highly effective, and free vaccine so get your vaccine to safeguard yourself and your family.”  

To date, 3,154,395 Coloradans 18 and older and 3,344,512 total Coloradans have been immunized with one dose. 2,957,758 Coloradans are fully immunized. Everyone 12 years of age and older is now eligible to get a COVID-19 vaccination. Find out where to get vaccinated by visiting https://covid19.colorado.gov/vaccine/where-you-can-get-vaccinated

While the United States as a whole has not achieved the goal and stands at 67% of adults with their first dose, Colorado is proud to be among the handful of states to make great progress in defeating the deadly virus and achieve President Biden’s goal. 

Governor: 70 percent of Colorado adults have received at least one dose of the life-saving COVID-19 vaccine

NWS: Flash flood watch for Grizzly Creek Fire burn area until 6 p.m.

CDOT

July 1, 2021, 12:30 p.m.

Travel alert
Flash Flood Watch I-70 Glenwood Canyon

A Flash Flood Watch is in effect for the #GrizzlyCreek burn scar in #GlenwoodCanyon. There are safety closures in place for rest areas in Glenwood Canyon and the recreation path.

Motorists planning to travel through Glenwood Canyon should monitor the weather closely. During a Flash Flood Watch, CDOT has crews and equipment on standby in preparation for a closure of #I70. If there is a Flash Flood Warning for the Grizzly Creek burn scar, CDOT will close I-70 in Glenwood Canyon. Updates on when the Watch ends will be posted to cotrip.org and CDOT’s Twitter page. #KnowBeforeYouGo #Colorado #GrizzlyCreekFire #I70MountainCorridor

National Weather Service

July 1, 2021, 11:34 a.m. – The National Weather Service in Grand Junction has issued a flash flood watch until 6 p.m. MDT for the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area in portions of northwest Colorado and west central Colorado, including the Flat Tops Wilderness, Central Colorado River Basin, and Gore and Elk Mountains/Central Mountain Valleys.

National Weather Service Meteorologists are forecasting heavy rainfall over the Grizzly Creek Fire burn area, which may lead to flash flooding and debris flows.

PRECAUTIONARY/PREPAREDNESS ACTIONS

You should monitor later forecasts and be prepared to take action should flash flood warnings be issued.

NWS: Flash flood watch for Grizzly Creek Fire burn area until 6 p.m.