GCPH: Hospitalizations up in Garfield County, booster offers greater protection

Garfield County Public Health

Hospitalizations increase, omicron retreats

As of Wednesday, January 27, Garfield County had 13 cases of individuals hospitalized with COVID-19, of which seven are unvaccinated, six vaccinated. Only two of the vaccinated had been boosted. The average age of those hospitalized was 63 for the unvaccinated, and 71 for the vaccinated.

“We know that hospitalizations and deaths follow case increases,” said Mason Hohstadt, Garfield County Public Health Specialist. “This increase in hospitalizations is not unexpected. The difference from this time last year to present is that we are seeing a lower proportion of cases being admitted for COVID-19.”

Boosters making large impact on hospitalization data

Protection offered by COVID-19 vaccine wane over time, even for those who receive two doses. However, the following findings show the importance of receiving a third dose of an mRNA vaccine when initial effectiveness has waned.

Unvaccinated adults ages 50 to 64 are 44 times more likely, (age 65 and older, 49 times more likely) to be hospitalized than those who have had three doses of the vaccine according to December 2021 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) data. Unvaccinated adults ages 50 to 64 are 17 times more likely to be hospitalized than those with only two doses of vaccine.

Another recent CDC study shows a third booster dose highly effective during both the delta and omicron predominant periods at preventing emergency room or urgent care visits (94 percent during delta and 82 percent during omicron circulation).

How to reuse KN95 masks

KN95 masks can be safely used more than once before being discarded. KN95 masks can be reused up to five times, though masks worn briefly, such as trips to the store, may last longer than those worn all day or worn around sick individuals. Masks that are visibly soiled, wearing down, or no longer maintaining a good seal, should be discarded.

To re-use your mask, CDC recommends placing used masks in paper bags for 5-7 days. This period of time allows any potential coronavirus to become inactive. Don’t try to wash, or disinfect masks with soap, bleach, or alcohol, as this can damage the mask material. FREE KN95 and surgical grade masks are available at locations around Garfield County.

Testing, Vaccine, Isolation/Quarantine Guidance at Garfield County COVID & Public Health

FREE home COVID tests: COVIDTests.gov  and Colorado rapid at-home testing program.

GCPH: Hospitalizations up in Garfield County, booster offers greater protection

CDPHE: Colorado’s COVID-19 epidemic curve should continue to decline in the weeks ahead

Colorado Department of Public Heath and Environment

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and Colorado School of Public Health released an updated statewide modeling report suggesting the current curve has begun to decline and should continue to do so in coming weeks, though Colorado is still experiencing a very high level of SARS-CoV-2 disease transmission in the state. 

“It is encouraging to see this modeling report suggest we have moved beyond the peak of our omicron surge, and that we should continue to see declining COVID-19 transmission in Colorado in the coming weeks,” said Dr. Rachel Herlihy, state epidemiologist. “There are still high levels of COVID-19 circulating in the state, so we ask Coloradans to remain cautious and continue to follow public health guidance to help protect themselves and others — get vaccinated, get a third dose as soon as it is time, wear a mask in public, and avoid large gatherings. Together we can work to ensure case rates continue to decrease in Colorado.”

Immunity to omicron is high and rising, and the modeling estimates that 80% of the state population will be immune to omicron by mid-February. Based on Colorado data, the Colorado COVID-19 Modeling Group estimates that one in 19 Coloradans is currently infectious. The report notes that while there is uncertainty around this estimate, all evidence indicates infection prevalence has been at unprecedented levels in January 2022, but the model projects this prevalence will decline in coming weeks, potentially to below 1% by the end of February.

The latest modeling projections are based on COVID-19 hospital census data through January 23, 2022, and vaccination data through January 14, 2022.

The Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) assembled the expert group that works with the state on modeling projections. The group includes modeling scientists at ColoradoSPH and the University of Colorado School of Medicine at the CU Anschutz Medical Campus, as well as experts from the University of Colorado Boulder, University of Colorado Denver, and Colorado State University.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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Se espera que la curva epidémica de COVID-19 en Colorado siga disminuyendo en las próximas semanas

La infección causada por la variante ómicron permanece en niveles elevados

DENVER (26 de enero de 2022) — El Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE) y Colorado School of Public Health publicaron un informe actualizado de modelización a nivel estatal, el cual sugiere que la presente curva epidémica ha comenzado a disminuir y debería seguir bajando en las próximas semanas, si bien aún se observa en Colorado un nivel muy alto de transmisión de la enfermedad SARS-CoV-2.

La Dra. Rachel Herlihy, epidemióloga estatal, expresó: “Es alentador constatar que este informe de modelización sugiere que hemos superado el pico de la oleada de la variante ómicron; se espera que la disminución de la propagación de COVID-19 en Colorado continúe en las próximas semanas. Todavía hay altos niveles de COVID-19 circulando en nuestro Estado, es por eso que le pedimos a los habitantes de Colorado que sigan siendo cautelosos y continúen acatando las recomendaciones de Salud Pública a efectos de protegerse a sí mismos y a los demás; entre estas se incluyen: vacunarse, recibir una tercera dosis tan pronto como les corresponda, usar un cubrebocas en público y evitar las reuniones muy concurridas. Trabajemos juntos para garantizar que las tasas de casos de COVID-19 sigan disminuyendo en Colorado”.

La inmunidad contra la variante ómicron ya es elevada y va en aumento; la modelización estima que el 80% de la población del Estado será inmune a esta variante a mediados de febrero. Basándose en los datos del Estado, el Colorado COVID-19 Modeling Group estima que uno de cada 19 de nuestros habitantes puede a la fecha contagiar a otros. El informe señala que, pese a que existe incertidumbre en torno a esta estimación, todos los datos indican que la prevalencia de la infección ha alcanzado niveles sin precedentes en enero de 2022. Dicho esto, la modelización prevé que esta tasa de incidencia disminuirá en las próximas semanas, pudiendo situarse por debajo del 1% a finales de febrero.

Las últimas proyecciones están basadas sobre los datos del censo hospitalario del COVID-19 recabados hasta el 28 de junio y datos de vacunación recogidos hasta el 14 de enero de 2022

Colorado School of Public Health (ColoradoSPH) estuvo a cargo de reunir el grupo de expertos que se ocupa de modelar estas proyecciones junto con el gobierno estatal. El grupo incluye a científicos de modelos de ColoradoSPH y de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de Colorado en el Campus Médico Anschutz de la UC, así como expertos de la Universidad de Colorado Boulder, la Universidad de Colorado Denver y la Universidad Estatal de Colorado.

Continúe manteniéndose informado visitando covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: Colorado’s COVID-19 epidemic curve should continue to decline in the weeks ahead

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats – 1/25/22:

Specimens collected thru Valley View: 43,573
Positive results: 4,217
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 444
Admitted patients discharged: 378

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  *   Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.

  *   Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.

  *   Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.

  *   Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing.

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for January 25, 2022

RIFLE, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats – 1/25/2022:

Number of individuals tested: 14,299
Positive results: 3,021
Pending results: 2
New positives since 1/18/22: 127
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 116
Patients transferred: 20
Patients discharged: 94

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

Moderna and PFIZER Booster Vaccine for Adults and children 5-11 are available by appointment only.

 To get an appointment please call 970 -625-1100.

As a reminder… the Emergency department sees patients with life threatening situations of life and limb. Our Respiratory clinic sees all upper respiratory illnesses including season flu, sore throats and COVID or COVID-like symptoms. Grand River Health seasonal respiratory clinics in Rifle and Battlement Mesa. The Rifle Clinic is open weekdays from 8a-11pm and Weekends 10a-6pm, the Respiratory clinic is in a new location on the south side of the facility.  Battlement Mesa Respiratory clinic is open weekdays 8a-5pm. All appointments can be made through the patient portal or by calling (970) 625-1100. Maps and information will be available online at www.grandriverhealth.org.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately.

All appointments can be made by calling (970) 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear an ear loop mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for January 25, 2022

CDPHE reminds parents and all Coloradans age 12 and older to get third dose of COVID-19 vaccine five months after receiving their primary series

Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

The state of Colorado continues its COVID-19 vaccination campaign with vaccine clinics throughout the state and a reminder that all Coloradans age 12 and older should receive a third vaccine dose five months after receiving their primary series. A third vaccine dose provides the highest level of protection against the COVID-19 virus and its variants.

The CDC recently updated the recommended timeline for when people can get a third Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine dose, shortening the minimum interval from six months to five months. The CDC also updated their recommendation for a third dose of Pfizer-BioNTech to include adolescents age 12 to 17.  At this time, only the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is authorized for adolescents aged 12-17.

Many vaccine clinics offer everything the family needs to get the highest level of protection: first and second doses, pediatric doses, and the important third dose. Flu vaccines may also be available and it is safe to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and a flu vaccine on the same day. A complete listing of where you can get vaccinated is here.

There are a number of large community vaccine sites throughout the state including:

  • Mesa County Public Health (510 29 1/2 Road, Grand Junction, CO 81504)

This clinic is in addition to the more than 1,800 vaccine providers across the state

Vaccines are the safest, most effective way to slow the spread of COVID-19 and its variants and to help avoid the worst outcomes (severe illness, hospitalization, and death) among those who do become infected. State health officials stress that all Coloradans ages 5 and older should get vaccinated with the COVID-19 vaccine. Coloradans should get a third dose of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine to ensure the highest level of  protection against the virus if they:

If you are immunocompromised and got three doses of Pfizer or Moderna in your primary series, you should get a fourth dose six months after your third dose. Additionally, the CDC recommends that moderately or severely immunocompromised 5– to 11-year-olds receive an additional primary dose of vaccine 28 days after their second dose of Pfizer pediatric vaccine.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE reminds parents and all Coloradans age 12 and older to get third dose of COVID-19 vaccine five months after receiving their primary series

CDOT: Glenwood Canyon traffic impacts, Jan. 24-28

Colorado Department of Transportation

Weather is forecasted to be favorable for the end of this week and into next week so both teams will continue with the eastbound one lane closure from Mile Point 123-124.5. The IHC Scott team will commence night work and will utilize the MP 123-124.5 lane closure for 22 hours each day for shift work from 8 a.m.-6 a.m. In order to accommodate commuter traffic, this lane closure will be lifted from 6 a.m.-8 a.m. each day.

A daytime westbound one lane closure from MP 118.5-119 will be in place to assist with roadway cleaning operations.
IHC Scott crews conducted a successful overnight operation with a crane pick to place a conveyor system in the Colorado River at Devil’s Hole (MP 124.4). This conveyor system will increase removal of material from the river bed to trucks that will haul the material to Rifle.

The Lawrence team continues off haul operations at MP 123.5/Blue Gulch and MP 124.5/Wagon Gulch. Motorists should anticipate slower speeds throughout the canyon and an increase in truck traffic. Work is weather dependent and motorists are reminded to drive the posted speeds through the work zone and drive for conditions.

Motorists planning to travel on I-70 in Glenwood Canyon should pay attention to road conditions on cotrip.org and weather forecasts. Rest area and recreation path information is also available at cotrip.org. I-70 safety closure information can be found on CDOT’s website by clicking here.

Anticipated traffic impacts
There will be an eastbound right lane closure from MP 123-124.5 for the Colorado River recovery work. This lane closure will be in place for 22 hours a day, from 8 a.m.-6 a.m. In order to accommodate commuter traffic, this lane closure will be lifted from 6 a.m.-8 a.m. each day.

The IHC Scott team will be initiating a night shift, so work will be conducted from 8 a.m.-6 a.m. Monday-Friday, in order to increase productivity.

A daytime westbound one lane closure from MP 118.5-119 will be in place to assist
with roadway cleaning operations.

In the coming weeks, work may take place on the weekends if necessary to complete
work before the end of April.

Stay informed and connect with the project
Project information is available at:
Project website: https://www.codot.gov/penwood-canyon-emergency-repairs-2021rojects/gl

Project information hotline: 970-319-1887

Project email: I70GlenwoodCanyon@gmail.com

CDOT: Glenwood Canyon traffic impacts, Jan. 24-28

CDHSEM: Polis administration providing free KN95 and surgical-grade masks to Colorado libraries and community centers

Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management

Free surgical-grade mask program builds upon state efforts to distribute millions of free masks to schools

DENVER — In support of the State of Colorado’s ongoing efforts to combat the COVID-19 pandemic and to assist in the mitigation of virus spread, the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management (DHSEM) will offer KN95 and surgical grade masks for free at public libraries, fire stations, recreation centers, VFWs, YMCAs, and high traffic community centers that have agreed to be local redistribution points. Masks will be available later this week and distribution sites are listed at covid19.colorado.gov/freemasks

This is part of an ongoing effort by the state to provide high quality personal protective equipment to Coloradans who might be especially at risk during the pandemic and future public health emergencies. With the ongoing surge of the COVID-19 omicron variant, the state recommends people upgrade from cloth masks to medical-grade masks like KN95 or surgical  masks.

“We are on a mission to help Coloradans keep themselves safe, and free medical grade masks are far more effective in preventing infection than cloth masks. By making free medical grade masks available at libraries across our state and soon for home delivery, we are giving Coloradans a powerful tool to avoid infection. We will continue to meet Coloradans where they are at when it comes to accessing the doctor approved vaccine, free testing at community sites, free tests delivered to your home and now providing free, surgical grade masks directly to communities,” said Gov. Polis.

“Colorado is leading the nation in COVID-19 response starting with our free at-home testing program and now or free distribution of high quality KN95 and surgical-grade masks,” Kevin Klein, Director of the Colorado Division of Homeland Security and Emergency Management said. “We are meeting the moment by ensuring that Coloradans have access to these masks to protect themselves and stop the spread of the virus.”

“Throughout this pandemic, we’ve prioritized equity and making sure all Coloradans have access to vaccines and other resources to protect themselves, their families, and communities. This mask program is another example of our commitment to end this pandemic,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director, CDPHE. “Wearing a mask and following public health protocols provides additional protection for Coloradans on top of getting the life-saving vaccine.”

Vaccination and mask wearing are the two most important tools Coloradans can use to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Now that all Coloradans age 5 and older have access to safe and effective COVID-19 vaccines, masks are only required in certain places for people who are not up to date on their COVID-19 vaccines. However, Coloradans, who are up to date on COVID-19 vaccines, may choose to protect themselves by wearing masks in public indoor places. 

Local communities and businesses may have additional mask restrictions. CDPHE encourages all Coloradans to keep masks with them in public and wear them if asked.

Everyone age 2 and older must still wear masks on planes, buses, trains, and other forms of public transportation traveling into, within, or out of the United States, and in U.S. transportation hubs such as airports and stations. This is required by federal law for both vaccinated and unvaccinated people.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDHSEM: Polis administration providing free KN95 and surgical-grade masks to Colorado libraries and community centers

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for January 18, 2022

RIFLE, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats – 1/18/2022

Number of individuals tested: 14,068
Positive results: 2,894
Pending results: 6
New positives since 1/11/22: 159
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 112
Patients transferred: 20
Patients discharged: 91

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

Moderna and PFIZER Booster Vaccine for Adults and children 5-11 are available by appointment only.

 To get an appointment please call 970 -625-1100.

As a reminder… the Emergency department sees patients with life threatening situations of life and limb. Our respiratory clinic sees all upper respiratory illnesses including season flu, sore throats and COVID or COVID-like symptoms. Grand River Health seasonal respiratory clinics in Rifle and Battlement Mesa. The Rifle Clinic is open weekdays from 8 am-11 pm and Weekends 10 am-6 pm, the respiratory clinic is in a new location on the south side of the facility.  Battlement Mesa Respiratory clinic is open weekdays 8 am-5 pm. All appointments can be made through the patient portal or by calling (970) 625-1100. Maps and information will be available online at www.grandriverhealth.org.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately

All appointments can be made by calling (970) 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear an ear loop mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for January 18, 2022

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats – 1/18/22
Specimens collected thru Valley View: 43,015
Positive results: 4,040
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 429
Admitted patients discharged: 367

Definitions:
Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

 *   Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
 *   Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
 *   Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
 *   Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing.

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

CDOT: Planned closure of Interstate 70 in Glenwood Canyon on Tuesday night

Colorado Department of Transportation

The Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) is implementing a full eastbound night closure of Interstate 70 in Glenwood Canyon on Tuesday, Jan. 18 from 11:55 p.m. to Wednesday, Jan. 19 at 6 a.m. The closure is from Exit 116 (Glenwood Springs) to Exit 133 (Dotsero). The official closure point for eastbound motorists is Exit 87 (West Rifle) to put vehicles on State Highway 13 as the identified alternate route. Eastbound motorists seeking to access Glenwood Springs or the Roaring Fork Valley may continue eastbound on I-70. Westbound lanes will remain open. This closure is necessary to place a crane on I-70 next to the Colorado River at milepost 124.4.

CDOT: Planned closure of Interstate 70 in Glenwood Canyon on Tuesday night