Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for November 12, 2020

RIFLE, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats – 11/12/2020:
Number of individuals tested: 4,600
Positive results: 395
Pending results: 143
New Positives since 11/10/20: 30
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 15
Patients Transferred: 5
Patients Discharged: 9

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately and patients with current symptoms will be scheduled for appointments in the respiratory clinic. 

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear a mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for November 12, 2020

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats – 11/12/2020

Specimens collected thru Valley View: 12,761
Positive results: 674
Pending results:  168
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 90
Admitted patients discharged: 79
Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing. 

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.  

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

State releases updated public health order for long-term care facility testing

Increased testing provided by state will further protect residents

Nov. 10, 2020 –  The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) today released an updated Public Health Order and guidance for residential care facilities requiring COVID-19 testing at skilled nursing facilities, assisted living residences, group homes, and intermediate care facilities. 
 
Changes will go into effect on Nov. 20, and include: 

  • All long-term care facilities must implement ongoing surveillance testing, plus outbreak testing as needed. 
  • Surveillance testing will be required weekly for staff, as well as for any residents who have left the facility.
  • All surveillance and outbreak testing will be conducted utilising polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, the most effective test for detecting infection with COVID-19 available.
  • Any single positive test within a facility will initiate outbreak testing of all residents and staff, regardless of the presence or absence of COVID-19-related symptoms.   

Read the summary of changes

“Expanded testing at long-term care facilities will further protect many of the Colorodans most at risk of experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director, CDPHE. 

To ensure compliance with the updated Public Health Order, the state of Colorado has partnered with Curative Labs, a national COVID-19 testing company, to assist facilities in meeting the new testing requirements. Through Curative Labs, the state will be providing test kits to all residential care facilities at no cost. 

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

State releases updated public health order for long-term care facility testing

State releases report to help schools determine learning environments

Report evaluates the costs and benefits of in-person learning during rising COVID-19 cases in Colorado

Nov. 11 , 2020 – Today, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) is releasing a report to help schools determine their best course of action as cases rise. Public health order 20-36 further clarifies that school districts are allowed to make decisions regarding in-person, hybrid, or virtual learning.

The report reviews public health data that reveals that, in general, schools have been able to mitigate the disease by implementing school guidance. Strategies such as cohorting, mask wearing, and disease investigation seem to be working to prevent school outbreaks. Students in grades K-8 are at a lower risk for in-school transmission than high school students.

CDPHE continues to recommend that school districts: 

  • Prioritize in-person learning for specific populations based on need and risk.
  • Eliminate or greatly restrict extracurricular activities.
  • Implement additional protective measures in school.

The CDPHE guidance also stresses the need for schools to evaluate their ability to support the emotional and mental health of the school community, and develop tools and protocols (such as regular outreach to students and families, peer mentorship, individual learning plans and goal setting, and outreach for identified concerns) to support their community. These additional considerations are especially critical if school districts decide to move to remote learning. 

Regardless of what strategy schools adopt, communication and coordination with educators, staff and other stakeholders in the school community is paramount. Individuals with medical vulnerabilities and other safety concerns should continue to receive support if they choose to learn or work remotely.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

State releases report to help schools determine learning environments

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats 11/10/2020
Specimens collected thru Valley View: 12,620
Positive results: 648
Pending results:  281
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 87
Admitted patients discharged: 74
Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing. 

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.  

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

Gov. Polis provides update on state’s response to COVID-19, urges Coloradans to step up and do their part to slow spread of deadly virus

DENVER – Today, Governor Polis provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19. 

“Colorado is issuing a requirement to wear a mask indoors for the next 30 days, and as hospitalizations increase everyone needs to do better by socializing only with those who you live with, wearing a mask and staying six-feet apart, so we can get our numbers under control. Early in the pandemic you heard me talk about using a scalpel instead of a sledgehammer — and that’s exactly what we’re doing now,” said Governor Polis. “Each community in Colorado is experiencing this pandemic differently and we want to be precise in our methods. We also have significantly more information and better tools at our disposal than we did in March, and people know what to do, we just need to do it. Together, I know we can get our state back on track and save lives.”

Throughout the pandemic, the State has developed better understanding of how the disease is transmitted, including the efficacy of masks in preventing transmission. The State has also increased access to testing, like that available at one of the State’s free, quick and easy testing sites, increased its supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) for frontline workers and scaled up hospital capacity while consistently working to update safety guidelines and restrictions around the data and science.

As mask wearing is a scientifically proven way to help slow the spread of the virus and help save lives, the Governor announced that the State would be extending Colorado’s statewide mask order for an additional 30 days. 

The Governor continues to urge all Coloradans to take three key steps to help save lives and prevent the spread of this deadly virus: 

  • Interact with only those in your household – This means all Coloradans need to do their best to avoid any social interactions with friends and family outside of their homes throughout the month of November. 
  • Keep your distance – Just because an individual is wearing a mask doesn’t mean they aren’t at risk if they are interacting with others in close proximity. Coloradans have to do a better job of staying six or more feet away from others. 
  • Wear a Mask – The numbers are clear. If an individual wears a mask, they have a much lower risk of getting or transmitting the virus. 

Governor Polis emphasized that progress has been made in preventing and treating the virus, and discussed the recent announcement about a vaccine. Colorado submitted the State’s COVID-19 vaccine plan to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in October. Coloradans must continue to exercise caution and follow public health best practices.

In an effort to do its part to change the trajectory of this virus, state employees, with limited exceptions, in counties with orange or red level incidence will be working remotely through at least the end of November. The Governor also urged local governments and businesses across the state that can do the same to please do so to help slow the spread of the virus. 

Gov. Polis provides update on state’s response to COVID-19, urges Coloradans to step up and do their part to slow spread of deadly virus

Recruitment of AmeriCorps members begins to expand COVID Containment Response Corps

DENVER —The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) will bring on an additional 100 AmeriCorps members to serve in the COVID-19 Containment Response Corps (CCRC) in staggered nine month terms over the next year. AmeriCorps members will support case investigation, contact tracing, resource coordination, test result notification, isolation and quarantine monitoring, and other activities to contain the spread of COVID-19 within Colorado. 

“The CCRC is an important part of Colorado’s COVID-19 response and the addition of 100 AmeriCorps members will help boost capacity,” said Governor Jared Polis. “Coloradans should cancel their social plans for the month of November and the services provided by CCRC like case investigation and isolation and quarantine monitoring are an important resource in the fight against the spread of this deadly virus.” 

Conservation Legacy and Community Resource Center will recruit and help onboard the AmeriCorps members, who will all serve remotely. Each will receive a living allowance and an education award of $4,336.50 upon completing their service. Priority will be given to interested candidates who apply by November 13 to start on November 30 or December 13 to start service on January 6, 2021. Interested individuals can find more information and apply at colorado.gov/servecolorado

“We are so proud of the service AmeriCorps and AmeriCorps Seniors have provided, and will continue to provide to the State of Colorado,” said Lt. Governor Dianne Primavera. “These individuals stepped up to provide critical support during a challenging time. Because of their service, more Coloradans have received timely information and resources to protect themselves and their loved ones.” 

The CCRC is a statewide effort created in June 2020 through a partnership between AmeriCorps, a federal agency; Gary Community Investments; Serve Colorado, the Governor’s Commission on Community Service; and CDPHE. Since June, more than 472 AmeriCorps members and 165 AmeriCorps Seniors volunteers have served in the CCRC.

CDPHE provided funding for the program and will train all AmeriCorps members. Gary Community Investments secured the technology and equipment necessary for the virtual service. Serve Colorado, the Governor’s Commission on Community Service, is hosting the webpage for CCRCs national service efforts, creating a single point of entry for individuals interested in signing up to serve. 

“The COVID-19 Containment Response Corps (CCRC) team owes a huge part of our success to our AmeriCorps members. Since the beginning of this pandemic, they have supported Coloradans by providing knowledge and wherewithal to the general public. During this unprecedented time, they have been essential to assisting the State of Colorado and the COVID response,” said Sarah Tuneberg, COVID-19 Innovation Response Team Lead and 

Senior COVID-19 Advisor.

CDPHE partners with the Colorado Public Health Workforce Collaborative to provide training for the national service corps members and volunteers. The collaborative consists of non-profit advocates, governmental agencies, hospitals, and university organizations coordinating efforts to hire, train, and deploy a comprehensive contact tracing and navigator workforce. For more information please contact the collaborative via email at ContactTracing@trailhead.institute

Serve Colorado, the Governor’s Commission on Community Service, administers the AmeriCorps program in Colorado and promotes community service throughout the state to build a culture of citizenship, service, and individual responsibility. AmeriCorps, a federal agency, brings people together to tackle the country’s most pressing challenges, through national service and volunteering. AmeriCorps members and AmeriCorps Seniors volunteers serve with organizations dedicated to the improvement of communities. AmeriCorps helps make service to others a cornerstone of our national culture. Learn more at AmeriCorps.gov

Recruitment of AmeriCorps members begins to expand COVID Containment Response Corps

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for November 10, 2020

RIFLE, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats 11/10/2020:

Number of individuals tested: 4,529
Positive results: 365
Pending results: 160
New Positives since 11/5/20: 29
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 14
Patients transferred: 5
Patients discharged: 8

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately and patients with current symptoms will be scheduled for appointments in the respiratory clinic. 

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear a mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for November 10, 2020

BLM rescinds fire restrictions in Moffat County

CRAIG, Colo. – The Little Snake and White River Field Offices will rescind fire restrictions on BLMmanaged lands in Moffat County on Friday, November 6 at 12:01 a.m. BLM public lands in Grand, Jackson,
Larimer, and Summit Counties remain in Stage 2 fire restrictions.

“The recent cooler weather and increased moisture have reduced the threat of extreme fire behavior in Moffat County,” said Little Snake Field Manager Bruce Sillitoe. “However, fuels remain extremely dry, and several large fires in northern Colorado are still burning. As always, we need visitors to be sure to use fire only where allowed and have plenty of water on hand to douse them before leaving.”

Stage 2 fire restrictions prohibit the following activities:

  1. Building, maintaining, attending, or using a fire, campfire, or stove fire 36 CFR 261.52(a). This includes charcoal grills and barbecues, coal and wood burning stoves and sheepherders’ stoves and includes use in developed camping and picnic grounds. EXCEPT: Devices using pressurized liquid or gas (stoves, grills, or lanterns) that include shut-off valves are permitted when used in an area at least three feet or more from flammable material such as grasses or pine needles.
  2. Smoking. 36 CFR 261.52(c) EXCEPT: Within enclosed vehicle, trailer, or building.
  3. Welding or operating acetylene or other torch with open flame. 36 CFR 261.52(i).
  4. Operating or using any internal combustion engine (e.g. chainsaw, generator, ATV) without a spark arresting device properly installed, maintained and in effective working order meeting either: (a)
    Department of Agriculture, Forest Service Standard 5100-1a; or (b) Appropriate Society of automotive Engineers (SAE) recommended practice J335(b) and J350(a). 36 CFR 261.52(j)
  5. Operating a chainsaw without an approved spark arresting device as described in Prohibition #4, a chemical pressurized fire extinguisher (8 oz. capacity by weight or larger and kept with the operator)
    and a round point shovel with an overall length of at least 35 inches readily available for use. 36 CFR 261.52(h).
  6. Using an explosive. 36 CFR 261.52(b). This includes but is not limited to fuses or blasting caps, fireworks, rockets, exploding targets, and tracers or incendiary. must be in the physical possession of the person or persons undertaking the exempted activities. 2. Any federal, state, or local officer, or member of an organized rescue or fire fighting force in the performance of an official duty is exempt from Prohibitions #1, #3, #4 and #5.
  7. Possessing or using a motor vehicle off established roads, motorized trails or established parking areas, except when parking in an area devoid or vegetation within 10 feet of the vehicle. 36 CFR 261.52
    Fire restrictions will be in place until further notice. In addition to criminal penalties, those found responsible for starting wildfires may also face restitution costs of suppressing the fire. BLM fire restriction orders and maps of restriction areas are available at Northwest District Fire Restrictions page. A full description of fire restriction stages 1 and 2 is available from the Rocky Mountain Area Coordination Center.
BLM rescinds fire restrictions in Moffat County

State launches #ShopLocalColorado to promote local holiday spending

DENVER – Governor Polis and the Colorado Office of Economic Development and International Trade (OEDIT) today announced #ShopLocalColorado to support Colorado small businesses in advance of the holiday shopping season. Shoppers can visit the Shop Local Colorado website to see a list of shop local campaigns in communities across Colorado.

“Colorado’s small businesses, entrepreneurs and restaurants are an economic engine for so many communities across Colorado and while the pandemic has created unique challenges, we are resilient and will build back stronger,” said Governor Jared Polis. “I encourage every Coloradan to shop local this holiday season and purchase superior grown in Colorado and made in Colorado products so we can support our small businesses that create local jobs, strengthen our communities, and fuel our economic momentum.”

There are more than 611,000 small businesses in Colorado, representing more than 99% of Colorado businesses. Small businesses in Colorado employ more than 1.1 million Coloradans, or nearly 50% of the Colorado workforce. Firms with fewer than 100 employees have the largest share of small business employment.

“As a former small business owner, I know how important local participation is to business success and sustainability. That’s doubly true today as small business owners retool and reimagine their business models to safely serve customers. When we shop local this holiday season, we receive the best of Colorado goods and services while giving the vital support that sustains local jobs and businesses. By shopping local, our spending helps our neighbors and our economy,” said OEDIT Executive Director Betsy Markey.

According to the Small Business Administration, when you shop locally, 70% of spending stays in the local economy, whereas only 40% remains when shopping non-locally. This means if you spend $100, your community keeps $70. This increases local tax revenues, used to support schools, police, fire stations, roads and more. Local businesses also utilize other local businesses such as marketing, accounting and printing, further impacting the local economy.

Everyone in Colorado is encouraged to participate in the campaign by posting on social media and using the hashtag #ShopLocalColorado. Small businesses can also print out flyers to put up around neighborhoods and shops, and update their cover photo by accessing the #ShopLocalColorado Social Media Toolkit.  

State launches #ShopLocalColorado to promote local holiday spending