CDPHE: Additional counties are moving to stricter levels on the dial

The state moves more counties to stricter levels on the dial to slow the spread 

Nov. 19 , 2020 – Today the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) announced several Colorado counties are moving to stricter levels on the state’s COVID-19 dial

As of Saturday, November 21, 2020 at 5 p.m., the following counties will be in Level Orange:

  • Baca
  • Bent
  • Kiowa

As of Sunday, November 22, 2020 at 5 p.m., the following counties will be in Level Red:

  • Alamosa
  • Otero
  • Prowers
  • Pueblo
  • Weld

Learn more on this updated capacity chart for all 6 levels. View the updated dial. County levels are reviewed on an ongoing basis, and will be regularly updated.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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Se suman condados a niveles más estrictos en el nivel de indicadores

El estado mueve más condados a niveles más estrictos en el nivel de indicadores para frenar la transmisión  

Nov. 19 , 2020 – El día de hoy, el Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE, por sus siglas en inglés) anunció que varios condados de Colorado se están dirigiendo a niveles más estrictos en el nivel de indicadores del COVID-19 del estado. 

A partir del sábado 21 de noviembre de 2020 a las 5 p.m., los siguientes condados estarán en el Nivel Naranja:

  • Baca
  • Bent
  • Kiowa

A partir del domingo 22 de noviembre de 2020 a las 5 p.m., los siguientes condados estarán en el Nivel Rojo:

  • Alamosa
  • Otero
  • Prowers
  • Pueblo
  • Weld

Infórmese más con este diagrama de capacidad actualizado para todos los 6 niveles. Vea el nivel de indicadores actualizado. Los niveles de los condados son revisados de forma continua y serán actualizados regularmente. 

Continúe manteniéndose informado visitando covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: Additional counties are moving to stricter levels on the dial

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for November 19, 2020

RIFLE, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats – 11/19/2020:

Number of individuals tested: 5,086
Positive results: 483
Pending results: 173
New Positives since 11/17/20: 24
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 18
Patients Transferred: 5
Patients Discharged: 9

Due to an increase in statewide testing there have been longer delays in receiving results. Average wait times are approximately 72 hours, up from the previous 24-48 hour turnaround times.

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

All clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately and patients with current symptoms will be scheduled for appointments in the respiratory clinic. 

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear a mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 cumulative stats for November 19, 2020

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats – 11/19/2020

Specimens collected thru Valley View: 13,635
Positive results: 780
Pending results:  169
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 102
Admitted patients discharged: 84
Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing. 

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.  

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

Garfield County requests to keep state COVID dial at yellow

CDPHE wants Garfield County to increase to high-risk orange category

GARFIELD COUNTY, CO – Garfield County has asked the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) to remain at the moderate yellow level of its COVID-19 dial amid increasing cases in the county. The Board of County Commissioners (BOCC) held a special meeting on Tuesday with CDPHE, which urged the county to move to the more restrictive orange, or “high-risk” category of its “Safer at Home” status.

Yellow or “concern” is when a county has more than 75 to 175 cases per 100,000 people over a 14-day period or a test positivity rate of no more than 10 percent. Orange status is in effect if a county experiences more than 175 to 350 cases per 100,000 people over a 14-day period or a test positivity rate of no more than 15 percent. Garfield County reported 382 new positive cases from Nov. 3 to 16, and a test positivity rate of 12 percent.

Commissioner John Martin noted that any movement in the state COVID dial would not jeopardize any variances already in place here in Garfield County. These allowed restaurants and places of worship to remain open at 50 percent capacity.

“We’re hoping to keep those where they are at 50 percent capacity,” Martin said. “That’s the desire of the county commissioners at this time.”

Commissioner Tom Jankovsky applauded the efforts of Garfield County businesses to ensure the safety of their customers and was opposed to increasing the level to orange.

“What you’re saying to us is, ‘put this on the backs of the small businesses; put this on the backs of the retail shops; put this on the backs of the restaurants and middle class,’” he said. “We know that they can’t take another shut down. It is not right to put this on small businesses. Our public health department has done a good job of mitigation.”

Mara Brosy-Wiwchar, chief of staff at CDPHE, told the board that Colorado has seen the virus run rampant in recent weeks with community transmission. She told the board that the state would consider the request to remain at yellow and get back with the commissioners.

“I appreciate the care and consideration you’ve given to public health and the pandemic,” she said. “Public Health Director Yvonne Long and the Garfield County Public Health Department are really remarkable in their leadership and I really appreciate the efforts they’re taking to keep your constituents safe. … That being said, your community spread has changed drastically from what it was in the summer to what it is currently.”

Brosy-Wiwchar added that the variances allowing the hot springs establishments in town to remain open would not be affected if the county’s COVID dial increased to orange.

On Tuesday, the state also unveiled a new color in its COVID-19 dial, purple, which would be in place under the direst of circumstances with extreme risk of disease spread. Purple is a “Stay at Home” order that would be in effect if hospital and health care services were approaching 90 percent capacity or experiencing a critical lack of staff and personal protection equipment (PPE).

“Psychologically, this impacts the entire community,” Jankovsky said of an increase to orange. “We are having a mental health crisis. Mind Springs Health reported an average of 314 patient sessions per month in the third quarter at the Glenwood Springs office.”

“We have to keep our businesses going. We have to keep our economy going,” Martin added. “We’re trying to survive.”

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El condado hace solicitud para mantenerse en Amarrillo según el marcador estatal de COVID

CDPHE quiere que el Condado Garfield suba a la categoría naranja de alto riesgo

CONDADO GARFIELD, CO – El Condado Garfield ha pedido al Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE) mantenerse en el nivel amarillo moderado de su marcador COVID-19 en medio de un aumento de casos en el condado. La Junta de Comisionados del Condado (BOCC) tuvieron una reunión especial el martes con CDPHE, que recomendó al condado a pasar a naranja, la más restrictiva, o categoría de “alto riesgo” de su estado “Más Seguro en Casa”.

Amarillo o “preocupante” es cuando un condado tiene más de 75 a 175 casos por cada 100,000 personas durante un período de 14 días o una tasa de pruebas positivas de no más del 10 por ciento. El estado naranja entra en efecto si un condado experimenta más de 175 a 350 casos por cada 100,000 personas durante un período de 14 días o una tasa de pruebas positivas de no más del 15 por ciento. El condado de Garfield informó 382 nuevos casos positivos del 3 al 16 de noviembre, y una tasa de pruebas positivas de un 12 por ciento.

El Comisionado John Martin señaló que cualquier movimiento en el marcador estatal de COVID no pondría en peligro ninguna variación ya existente aquí en el Condado de Garfield. Esta variación permitió que restaurantes e iglesias permanecieran abiertos al 50 por ciento de su capacidad.

“Esperamos mantenerlos al 50 por ciento de su capacidad”, dijo Martin. “Ese es el deseo de los comisionados del condado en este momento”.

El Comisionado Tom Jankovsky aplaudió los esfuerzos de los negocios del Condado de Garfield para garantizar el bienestar de sus clientes y se opuso a cambiar a nivel naranja.

“Lo que nos está diciendo es, ‘ponga esto en la espalda de las pequeñas empresas; poner esto en tiendas minoristas; poner esto en la espalda de restaurantes y clase media ‘”, dijo. “Sabemos que no pueden aguantar otro cierre. No es correcto aplicar esto a pequeñas empresas. Nuestro departamento de salud pública ha hecho un buen trabajo de mitigación”.

Mara Brosy-Wiwchar, jefa de personal de CDPHE, dijo a la junta que Colorado ha visto cómo el virus se propaga desenfrenadamente en las últimas semanas con transmisión comunitaria. Ella le dijo a la junta que el estado consideraría la solicitud de permanecer en amarillo y notificaría a los comisionados.

“Agradezco el cuidado y la consideración que le ha brindado a salud pública y a la pandemia”, dijo. “La Directora de Salud Pública, Yvonne Long, y el Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado Garfield son realmente notables en su liderazgo y realmente aprecio los esfuerzos que están haciendo para mantener su comunidad a salvo. … Dicho esto, la expansión de su comunidad ha cambiado drásticamente de lo que era en el verano a lo que es actualmente “.

Brosy-Wiwchar agregó que las variaciones que permiten que los establecimientos de aguas termales en la ciudad permanezcan abiertas no se verían afectadas si el marcador del COVID del condado aumentara a naranja.

El martes, el estado también dio a conocer un nuevo color en su marcador de COVID-19, el púrpura, que estaría en su lugar en las circunstancias más extremas con riesgo extremo de propagación de enfermedades. El morado es una orden de “Quedarse en Casa” que estaría en vigor si los servicios hospitalarios y de atención médica se acercaran al 90 por ciento de su capacidad o experimentaran una falta crítica de personal y equipo de protección personal (PPE).

“Psicológicamente, esto afecta a toda la comunidad”, dijo Jankovsky sobre un cambio a el color naranja. “Estamos teniendo una crisis de salud mental. Mind Springs Health informó un promedio de 314 sesiones de pacientes por mes en el tercer trimestre en la oficina de Glenwood Springs “.

“Tenemos que mantener nuestros negocios en marcha. Tenemos que mantener nuestra economía en marcha”, agregó Martin. “Estamos tratando de sobrevivir”.

Garfield County requests to keep state COVID dial at yellow

CDPHE: Several Colorado counties move to level red on state dial

Public health order specifies stricter levels as cases rise

Nov. 17, 2020 – Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) released an updated public health order that provides necessary updates to the COVID-19 dial framework today. The order updates Level Red to indicate counties where there is severe risk of COVID-19 spreading rapidly, while allowing some businesses to remain open at very limited capacity. A sixth level, Level Purple: Extreme Risk, will be added to the dial, representing when hospital capacity risks being breached and most businesses and indoor services must be closed. The updated dial levels will go into effect on Friday, Nov. 20. Read a summary of changes

The Colorado COVID-19 dial is a tool that allows Colorado to balance the urgent need to contain the virus with the need for localized guidance during the pandemic. 

“We are adding a new level to the dial in response to out-of-control levels of COVID-19 transmission across the state,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director, CDPHE. “Coloradans must take proactive steps to reduce the spread of the virus to protect their families and communities. Wear a mask, avoid in-person interactions with people from outside your household, and wash your hands frequently. If we are not careful now, we risk plunging into the deep end of the dial, where hospitals are not able to serve everyone who needs care, whether they are COVID-19 patients or other types of patients. It’s up to all Coloradans to help our essential health care workers save lives.”

The new dial levels, effective Nov. 20, are:

  1. Level Green – Protect Our Neighbors: for counties that are able to locally contain surges. Most businesses are open with generous capacity limits. 
  2. Level Blue – Caution: for counties with low transmission levels that aren’t quite ready for Protect Our Neighbors. Capacity limits are more permissive than yellow.
  3. Level Yellow – Concern: the baseline level for counties with elevated transmission levels but stable hospitalizations. 
  4. Level Orange – High Risk:  for counties where numbers are going up but not to the point where everything needs to be shut down. The capacity limits are moderate.
  5. Level Red – Severe Risk: for counties with high levels of transmission, hospitalizations, and positivity rates. Most indoor activities are prohibited or strictly limited, and outdoor activities are encouraged as an alternative. The capacity limits are significant.
  6. Level Purple – Extreme Risk: for counties where hospital capacity is at extreme risk of being overrun. At this level, all businesses must significantly curtail in person functions and people must stay at home except for necessary activities.

CDPHE has notified the following counties that they will move to Level Red on Friday, November 20, 2020:

  • Adams
  • Arapahoe
  • Boulder
  • Broomfield
  • Clear Creek
  • Denver
  • Douglas
  • Jefferson
  • La Plata
  • Logan
  • Mesa
  • Morgan
  • Routt
  • Summit
  • Washington

CDPHE has notified the following counties that they will move to Level Orange on Friday, November 20, 2020:

  • Costilla
  • Custer
  • Lake
  • Montezuma
  • Pitkin
  • San Juan

CDPHE has notified the following counties that they will move to Level Yellow on Friday, November 20, 2020:

  • Las Animas
  • Gunnison

CDPHE will share additional counties moving to more restrictive levels as necessary. 

Learn more on this updated capacity chart for all 6 levels. View the updated dial.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: Several Colorado counties move to level red on state dial

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO. – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats 11/17/2020
Specimens collected thru Valley View: 13,337
Positive results: 752
Pending results:  100
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 96
Admitted patients discharged: 80
Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing. 

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.  

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

Updated Valley View COVID-19 cumulative stats

State provides COVID-19 guidance to Colorado General Assembly

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) today provided guidance to the Colorado General Assembly to convene as safely as possible. Because government is an essential service, it is exempt from most public health orders. The House of Representatives and the Senate can adopt their own rules to govern procedures and enforce compliance by members. CDPHE’s guidance is intended to assist them in keeping members of the General Assembly and other essential personnel as safe as possible during COVID-19. 

Recommendations include:

  • As much as possible, legislative business should be conducted remotely so as to not unnecessarily put members, staff, and the public at risk of exposure. 
  • Everyone who will be physically present for business in the capitol, including legislators, security, and press, should undergo a health screening and symptom check daily upon arrival before entering the building.
  • Members of the General Assembly, nonpartisan staff, and other legislative staff should get COVID-19 tests before and during session.
  • Members should frequently use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol or wash hands with soap and water.
  • The state’s Emergency Operations Center can provide masks to be worn by essential personnel (members of the General Assembly, staff, press, and others). 
  • Outside visitation to the building should be limited as much as possible during the reconvening of the General Assembly. The General Assembly should establish virtual communications for the public, lobbyists, and non-essential staff to engage with the General Assembly in lieu of in-person contact.

View the full Guidance for Operating the 2020 Special Session during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

State provides COVID-19 guidance to Colorado General Assembly

State health officials release guide to safer Thanksgiving

Enjoy the holiday safely by celebrating at home or virtually

Nov. 17, 2020 – Thanksgiving is one of the most delicious days of the year, and a wonderful time to celebrate the people closest to you. As COVID-19 cases continue to rise throughout Colorado, it’s important to do everything possible to keep yourself and your loved ones safe while celebrating Thanksgiving. 

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) advises Coloradans to only interact in-person with people from their household this Thanksgiving to help slow the alarming spread of COVID-19. This holiday season is an opportunity to reimagine what togetherness can look like and come up with creative ways to celebrate loved ones while making sure they stay healthy for many more years to come. 

Dos and don’ts for Thanksgiving celebrations:

  • Do cook and eat a special meal with members of your immediate household.
  • Do video chat or talk on the phone with friends and family who don’t live with you.
  • Do wear a mask and keep 6 feet of distance from others while grocery shopping for your Thanksgiving feast.
  • Don’t travel to visit family and friends in other households.

See all Thanksgiving guidelines on our website at https://covid19.colorado.gov/thanksgiving. Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

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Funcionarios de salud del estado publican la guía para un Día de Acción de Gracias más seguro

Disfrute del Día de Acción de Gracias festejando de manera segura en casa o virtualmente

Nov. 17, 2020 – El Día de Acción de Gracias es uno de los días más festejados del año, y una gran oportunidad de celebrar con aquellos más cercanos a usted. A medida que el número de casos del COVID-19 sigue aumentando en Colorado, es importante que haga todo lo posible para cuidarse a usted mismo y a sus seres queridos, al estar celebrando el Día de Acción de Gracias. 

El Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE, por sus siglas en inglés), le recomienda a los habitantes de Colorado a interactuar sólo con personas que vivan en su misma vivienda en el Día de Acción de Gracias, para ayudar a frenar  la propagación alarmante del COVID-19. Esta temporada festiva es una oportunidad para poder reimaginar lo que estar unidos puede ser y también pensar en maneras creativas para poder celebrar a aquellos seres queridos mientras nos aseguramos  que se mantengan saludables en los años venideros.  

Los Sí y No para los festejos del Día de Acción de Gracias:

  • Prepare y coma una cena especial con las personas de su vivienda.
  • Haga una videollamada o hable por el teléfono con amigos y familia que no viven con usted.
  • Utilice un tapabocas y mantenga 6 pies de distancia de otros mientras hace sus compras del Día de Acción de Gracias.
  • No viaje para visitar a familia y amigos de otra vivienda.

Vea todas las guías del Día de Acción de Gracias en nuestro sitio web https://covid19.colorado.gov/thanksgiving

Continúa manteniéndose informado visitando covid19.colorado.gov.  

State health officials release guide to safer Thanksgiving

Governor Polis provides update on COVID-19

DENVER – Governor Polis provided an update on the state’s response to COVID-19 and made several significant announcements.

“I will never give up on Coloradans and I know we have the resolve to do what is necessary to defeat this virus. Cases and hospitalizations have continued rising with over 1,100 Coloradans currently hospitalized for COVID,” said Governor Polis. “We simply must do a better job of wearing masks, physically distancing and avoiding social interactions with those outside our households. It’s up to us, Colorado, the time for change is now.”

The Governor announced that given the rise in cases across our state, he has ordered the State Emergency Operations Center to return to level 1. This is the highest level of operation and brings together all state agencies, federal partners and the voluntary organizations that serve the State’s communities in crisis. At this level, the EOC can better coordinate and synchronize the state’s response to the pandemic.

In addition, the governor shared that he has signed an executive order that will clarify the order of operations for surging hospital capacity for the State of Colorado. The first line of defense is for hospitals to increase their capacity internally by opening up unused space and augmenting their staffing. If further capacity is needed, then hospitals must scale back elective procedures. If patient load continues to surge after these steps the state will support the Colorado Hospital Association to address the interhospital transfer system, and if caseload further exceeds these strategies, alternative care sites will be utilized as a last resort. Hospitals need to exhaust all of their resources before alternative care sites are utilized. 

This executive order directs all general hospitals to submit a plan to the state with their maximum surge bed count by Wednesday, November 18, and a complete surge plan to CDPHE by November 20, 2020, and must include:

  • A detailed plan to potentially increase bed capacity by at least fifty percent (50%) and provide staffing and medical equipment for such increase;
  • Strategies to increase the number of ICU beds by transitioning medical and surgical beds to ICU beds if needed. 
  • A detailed staffing plan, sufficient to provide adequate care for all beds, including those in use or available to patients other than COVID-19 patients.
  • A mandate for elective procedures to be actively managed, reduced and/ or delayed if there is a surge of COVID-19 infections in the county or municipality in which the facility is located. 

It also directs that all hospitals report the maximum number of staffed ICU beds that can be made available for patients in need of ICU level care, as well as the maximum number of staffed medical and surgical beds available for non ICU hospitalization at 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. each day. Hospitals and medical providers are encouraged to continue utilizing telehealth and virtual visits as much as possible. 

Under current public health orders, hospitals that are at more than 70% capacity or have less than a two-week supply of PPE must actively manage their elective procedures to ensure they have adequate capacity for a surge of patients, which has been the law of Colorado since July. Governor Polis shared that he plans to update both the executive orders and public health order to make it clear that hospitals experiencing stress and strain serving patients must begin a mandatory scale back of elective procedures in anticipation for a surge of patients in the coming weeks. 

The Governor extended an executive order increasing the Medicaid home health workforce and eliminating cost-sharing for COVID-19 testing and treatment for Medicaid enrollees. The Governor also extended an Executive Order related to criminal justice. Finally, the governor amended and extended an executive order concerning multiple fires statewide.  

Governor Polis announced the good news that more than one million Coloradans have opted in to receiving the Colorado Exposure Notification technology which went live on all Android and Apple phones last month. Coloradans can visit addyourphone.com for more information or to sign up.

In order to scale up testing, the state is partnering with COVIDCheck Colorado, part of Gary Community Investments, who has launched seven testing sites around the metro area that are now open to the general public. 

“Through our partnership with the State of Colorado, COVIDCheck Colorado has made fast and accurate COVID-19 testing available to all Coloradans, free of charge, through December 2020,” said Mike Johnston, CEO, Gary Investments.  If you are symptomatic or have been exposed to COVID-19 – Test Now. If you are working in a public facing capacity – test regularly. If you feel you need a test for any reason – test as needed.”

CovidCheck Colorado test are available at the following locations:

  • All City Stadium
    1495 S. Race Street, Denver, CO 80210
  • Cherry Creek High School
    4700 S. Yosemite Street, Greenwood Village, CO 80111
  • Instructional Support Facility
    5416 S. Riviera Way Aurora, CO 80015
  • North High School
    3125 Eliot Street, Denver, CO 80211
  • Mountain Range High 
    12500 Huron Street Westminster, CO 80234
  • St. Vrain Valley Schools Innovation Center
    33 Quail Road, Longmont, CO 80504
  • Aurora Public Schools Professional Learning Center
    15771 E. 1st Ave, Aurora, CO 80011

The governor’s presentation can be viewed here.

Governor Polis provides update on COVID-19

Sixth Garfield County resident passes away from complications due to COVID-19

GARFIELD COUNTY, CO – A Garfield County woman in her eighties has died from complications due to COVID-19. This is the sixth death in the county.

“She was receiving care in a hospital outside of the county,” said Yvonne Long, Garfield County Public Health Director. “Our condolences and thoughts are with the family. This is a sad reminder of how COVID can impact people, especially those in our more vulnerable populations.”

Sixth Garfield County resident passes away from complications due to COVID-19