Carbondale Emergency Task Force (CETF) Partners with Roaring Fork Neurology to Launch FREE Covid-19 Test Site in Carbondale

CARBONDALE, Colo. (November 25, 2020) – The Carbondale Emergency Task Force (CETF) announces a partnership with Roaring Fork Neurology to launch Carbondale’s first and only free COVID-19 test site, opening Tuesday December 1, 2020.

Where is the Carbondale testing site located? The COVID-19 test site is located at the west side of Carbondale Town Hall, at 511 Colorado Ave, in the Rec Center parking lot. Access is via car from 4th Street (behind Town Hall). It is an outside, tented site and is conveniently accessible as a drive-through.

What are operating hours and days? The COVID-19 test site will operate Monday-Friday, 9 AM to 1 PM.

How do I make an appointment? This service is appointment-only testing and does not require a doctor’s referral or appointment. Walk-ups are not available at this time and Appointments must made via the following website: www.rfvcovidtest.com

How much does COVID testing cost? All COVID testing is free for those in the Roaring Fork Valley. Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has purchased the tests for our Valley in collaboration with local public health departments and MicrogenDx.

What kind of COVID test is offered? Our test is a saliva PCR test from MicrogenDx. At your appointment time, you will park in a parking space near our Testing Tent and wait for our staff to come to your car. We will have a specimen cup with your name on it, and we will hand you the cup to provide a saliva sample.

When and how will I know my results? MicrogenDx has a typical turnaround time of 48-72 hours. However, as the volume of testing increases, there is always a possibility of a delay. You will receive your results through the email address that you provide when scheduling your appointment. If your test is positive, you will also get a call from our Testing Team and from local public health authorities regarding next steps.

Can children be tested? If your child can provide a saliva (spit) sample, then we can test them. This is usually best for children at least 5 years old. Please know that our local schools follow certain protocols that require a clinical evaluation with a healthcare professional in order to get clearance to return to school. Contact your child’s pediatrician for clearance to go to school and to return to sports after any illness.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19? People with COVID-19 have had a wide range of symptoms reported – ranging from mild symptoms to severe illness. Symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure to the virus and include the following:

  • Fever or chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue
  • Muscle or body aches
  • Headache
  • New loss of taste or smell
  • Sore throat
  • Congestion or runny nose
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Diarrhea

If I am not feeling well, what should I do? Many individuals have mild symptoms and do not need to see a doctor. However, older adults and people who have severe underlying medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness. We also know that many young people, including children, can develop more serious illness. If anyone is showing any of these emergency warning signs of COVID-19, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you. Call 911 or call ahead to your local emergency facility and notify the operator that you are seeking care for someone who has or may have COVID-19.

All individuals who have had a COVID19-like illness should see their primary care doctor for clearance to return to school and any high intensity sports activities in the future to be sure that there are no long-term cardiac issues from the virus.

What should I do while waiting for my results? It depends on your situation and why you are being tested.

*If you have been exposed to someone who has tested positive for the virus, you need to quarantine for a total of 14 days from your last exposure while monitoring for any symptoms. This is true no matter what results you receive from us. This is not optional, and testing does not change what you have to do.

*If you have any symptoms of COVID-19, you should isolate immediately, including isolating in a room in your home away from others. Even if your test comes back positive, you will need to continue to isolate for a total of 10 days from the start of symptoms AND until you have been symptom-free including no fever for at least 24 hours, whichever is longer.

*If you are testing for travel purposes and have no symptoms and no exposure to the virus, you do not need to isolate or quarantine.

All individuals, no matter the reason for testing, should be following the Five Commitments To Containment:
1. Maintain 6 feet of distance from anyone not in your household.
2. Wash your hands often.
3. Wear a mask in public.
4. Stay home when sick.
5. Seek testing immediately and self-report if you experience symptoms.

Who will see my test results? We report all COVID test results to our local public health departments and to the State of Colorado. You will also receive an email with your test results.

Carbondale Emergency Task Force (CETF) Partners with Roaring Fork Neurology to Launch FREE Covid-19 Test Site in Carbondale

UPDATED VALLEY VIEW COVID-19 CUMULATIVE STATS

The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 Cumulative Stats 11/24/2020
Specimens collected thru Valley View: 14,159
Positive results: 888
Pending results:  51
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 111
Admitted patients discharged: 89

Reported numbers are from Valley View only and could change at any time.

Definitions:

Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional Questions:

“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing. 

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.  

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

UPDATED VALLEY VIEW COVID-19 CUMULATIVE STATS

Minimize travel this holiday week

Maximize safeguards to reduce risk from virus; watch for winter weather early in the week 

DENVER – While nonessential travel is not recommended due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the Colorado Department of Transportation still anticipates increased traffic along some of the state roadways over Thanksgiving weekend. 

This Thanksgiving, the state of Colorado is urging people to not not gather with anyone outside of your household (people you don’t live with), to wear a mask when you’re outside of your home and stay 6 feet from others. One out of 49 Coloradans is infected with this deadly virus.

“We all have a duty to keep ourselves and each other safe, whether traveling or staying close to home,” said CDOT Executive Director Shoshana Lew. “If you are on the road, stay alert and avoid impaired driving at all costs — unfortunately the holidays can be a dangerous time for accidents. This year, please be extra cautious due to the severe COVID risk that many regions are experiencing right now.  If you do drive, be mindful of the COVID ‘dial level’ where you are traveling, wear a mask, and maintain social distance.” 

Additional information on the COVID-19 dial framework is available here

Expect slick and some snowpacked conditions on roads in the high country and along the Front Range this week, and a challenging Tuesday morning commute for the Denver region

Snow is expected in the mountains and along the foothills beginning Monday night, with two to five inches possible in the Denver metro area, four to eight inches in the foothills and six to ten inches on the I-70 mountain corridor.

Denver motorists should expect a burst of snow to fall quickly during Tuesday’s morning commute, making for a challenging drive with slushy, snow packed and icy conditions likely. The most severe conditions are expected in the suburbs to the west and south of Denver, the foothills and Palmer Divide, according to the forecast.   

If possible, limit travel until the storm moves out later tomorrow.  Motorists should be equipped for winter weather with the appropriate tires. 

Motorists heading to ski areas should check road conditions at www.cotrip.org and review weather forecasts before traveling. This applies to motorists traveling on Interstate 70, U.S. 285 and other major roadways. 

CDOT winter driving tips downloadable flyer: WinterWise Driving Tips.  Please go to the bottom of the release for information on the chain and traction laws. 

Construction work suspended over the holiday and typical traffic volumes on the I-70 Mountain Corridor

CDOT construction and maintenance projects will be suspended beginning Wednesday to help minimize traffic impacts. Projects can resume work on Monday, Nov. 30.  The only exception is for emergency operations.  

Thanksgiving traffic typically is lower than during other holiday weekends. Vehicle numbers through the Eisenhower/Johnson Memorial Tunnels in 2019 was as follows: 

WestboundEastboundTotal
Wednesday, Nov. 2724,88018,57343,453
Thursday, Nov. 2817,42313,97431,397
Friday, Nov. 297,55812,04419,602
Saturday, Nov. 3014,54020,32934,869
Sunday, Dec. 120,31925,61545,934
Total84,72090,535175,255

In addition to checking cotrip.org, drivers can get the latest information on the status of the state’s roadways by calling 511.  Specific information regarding Interstate 70 is available at: www.GoI70.com.  

For more information on how to have a safer Thanksgiving, please see:  https://covid19.colorado.gov/thanksgiving

CHAIN and TRACTION LAWS 

CDOT urges travelers to be aware of chain and traction law codes before heading out on the roadway.

  • Code 18/Commercial Chain Law: Commercial vehicles and trucks must have chains. Vehicles without chains can often lose traction, causing traffic delays and sometimes road closures. For the safety of the traveling public, it’s critical to use chains to be in compliance with Colorado’s chain law.
  • Code 15/Passenger Traction Law: All motorists are required to either have an all-wheel or four-wheel drive vehicle, or (for two-wheel drive vehicles) snow tires or all-weather tires with a mud/snow designation. Tread depth on all tires must be at least 3/16″ regardless of vehicle type. Vehicles that do not meet these criteria must carry chain devices or alternative traction devices such as an AutoSock. The law focuses on passenger vehicles, as commercial vehicles have their own restrictions. It is unlawful to proceed when a state highway is closed or to proceed when a restriction is in effect without the required traction equipment. Violators will be given a citation, which comes with a $100 fine and $32 surcharge. That jumps to a $500 fine with a $156 surcharge if a violation results in the closure of one or more traffic lanes.
  • Code 16/Passenger Chain Law: All passenger vehicles need chains, except for 4WD and AWD vehicles with all-weather tires with 3/16 inch tread depth.
Minimize travel this holiday week

UPDATED GRAND RIVER HEALTH COVID-19 CUMULATIVE STATS FOR NOVEMBER 24, 2020

November 24, 2020, RIFLE, COLO – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 Cumulative Stats 11/24/2020:
Number of individuals tested: 5227
Positive results: 565
Pending results: 60

New Positives since 11/17/20: 82
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 23
Patients Transferred: 5
Patients Discharged: 13

Due to an increase in statewide testing there have been longer delays in receiving results. Average wait times are approximately 72 hours, up from the previous 24-48 hour turnaround times.

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

All Clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately and patients with current symptoms will be scheduled for appointments in the respiratory clinic. 

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear a mask while in the facility.

UPDATED GRAND RIVER HEALTH COVID-19 CUMULATIVE STATS FOR NOVEMBER 24, 2020

State moves Garfield County to ‘high-risk’ orange on COVID-19 dial

County commissioners had asked CDPHE to remain in the yellow ‘concern’ level

GARFIELD COUNTY, CO – The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has moved Garfield County into the orange, or “high-risk” category, on its COVID-19 dial, which is a tool to determine its restrictions during the pandemic. The Board of County Commissioners appealed to CDPHE earlier this week to remain in the yellow, or “concerned” category, noting that it more accurately reflects the situation in Garfield County.

In a phone meeting on Nov. 17 with Mara Brosy-Wiwchar, chief of staff at CDPHE, the board argued that Garfield County has worked with its citizens and businesses to promote education and best practices, and that further limiting the local economy would be both financially damaging and unduly punitive to all that are complying by current rules.

For Garfield County, the change means some tighter restrictions, though the state has indicated that current variances will remain in place. New variance requests are prohibited until the county is back at the yellow level. Municipalities may implement more stringent measures, but none less strict than those at the orange level.

The major changes under orange, factoring in Garfield County’s existing variances, include no more than 10 people from no more than two households at public and private gatherings; in-person office occupancy of no more than 25 percent, with remote work encouraged; indoor and outdoor events are limited to 25 percent of posted occupancy, or 50 and 75 people, respectively, whichever is less. Personal services are also limited to 25 percent occupancy, or 25 people, whichever is less.

Retail establishments remain at 50 percent capacity, with options for curbside pick-up, delivery and shopping hours for seniors and at-risk persons. Indoor restaurant service rules remain the same, however outdoor dining areas must limit groups to no more than 10 customers per group, and patrons must be six feet apart. Restaurant liquor sales must end by 10 p.m.

Organized recreational youth or adult indoor sports are not allowed, but outdoor events may proceed with groups of 10 or less practicing safe social distancing. Houses of worship will continue to operate at yellow levels under the county’s variance. The full list of restrictions and variances under level orange as it will be applied in Garfield County can be read on the county’s public health orders webpage at www.garfield-county.com/public-health/executive-orders.

The yellow or “concern” level is when a county has more than 75 to 175 cases per 100,000 people over a 14-day period or a test positivity rate of no more than 10 percent. Orange status is in effect if a county experiences more than 175 to 350 cases per 100,000 people over a 14-day period or a test positivity rate of no more than 15 percent. Garfield County, home to roughly 58,000 people, reported 395 new positive cases (equates to 659 per 100,000) from Nov. 5 to 18, and a test positivity rate of 12.4 percent.

Limiting the disease’s spread is encouraged by having residents practice safety guidelines of wearing masks, washing their hands often, limiting travel as much as possible, and above all, staying home when ill.

____________________________________________________________________________

COMUNICADO DE PRENSA

19 de noviembre, 2020


El Condado Garfield es movido a color naranja considerado “alto riesgo” en el marcador de COVID-19 por el Estado

Comisionados del condado habían pedido a CDPHE que permaneciera en el nivel amarillo de “preocupación”

CONDADO GARFIELD, CO – El Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE) ha trasladado al condado de Garfield a color naranja o categoría de “alto riesgo” de su marcador de COVID-19, este marcador es una herramienta para determinar restricciones durante la pandemia.  La Junta de Comisionados del Condado apeló al CDPHE a principios de esta semana para permanecer en color amarillo o categoría “preocupado”, señalando que refleja con mayor precisión la situación en el Condado de Garfield.

En una reunión telefónica el 17 de noviembre con Mara Brosy-Wiwchar, jefa de personal de CDPHE, la junta de comisionados argumentó que el condado de Garfield ha trabajado con sus ciudadanos y empresas para promover la educación y las mejores prácticas, y que limitar aún más la economía local sería tanto económicamente perjudicial e indebidamente punitiva para todos los que están cumpliendo con las normas vigentes.

Para el Condado Garfield, el cambio significa algunas restricciones más estrictas, aunque el estado ha indicado que las variaciones actuales seguirán vigentes. Las nuevas solicitudes de variación están prohibidas hasta que el condado vuelva al nivel amarillo. Los municipios pueden implementar medidas más estrictas, pero no menos estrictas que las del nivel naranja.

Los principales cambios bajo naranja, teniendo en cuenta las variaciones existentes en el Condado Garfield, incluyen no más de 10 personas de no más de dos hogares en reuniones públicas y privadas; ocupación de personal en oficinas de no más del 25 por ciento, con la recomendación de trabajar remotamente; Los eventos al interior y exterior están limitados al 25 por ciento de la ocupación publicada, o 50 y 75 personas, respectivamente, la que sea menor. Los servicios personales también están limitados a una ocupación del 25 por ciento, o 25 personas, la que sea menor.

Establecimientos minoristas permanecen al 50 por ciento de su capacidad, con opciones para llevar, entregar y comprar en la acera para personas mayores y personas en riesgo. Las reglas del servicio de restaurante interior siguen siendo las mismas, sin embargo, las áreas de comedor al aire libre deben limitar los grupos a no más de 10 clientes por grupo, y los clientes deben estar separados por seis pies. Las ventas de licores en restaurantes deben finalizar a las 10 p.m.

No se permiten deportes recreativos al interior para jóvenes o adultos, pero los eventos al aire libre pueden continuar con grupos de 10 o menos practicando un distanciamiento social seguro. Las iglesias continuarán operando en nivel amarillo bajo la variación del condado. Una lista completa de restricciones y variaciones a nivel naranja y como se aplicará en el condado de Garfield se pueden leer en la página web bajo órdenes de salud pública del condado en www.garfield-county.com/public-health/executive-orders.

El nivel amarillo o de “preocupación” es cuando un condado tiene más de 75 a 175 casos por cada 100,000 personas durante un período de 14 días o una tasa de positividad de la prueba de no más del 10 por ciento. El nivel naranja está en efecto si un condado experimenta más de 175 a 350 casos por cada 100,000 personas durante un período de 14 días o una tasa de positividad de la prueba de no más del 15 por ciento. El condado de Garfield, hogar de aproximadamente 58,000 personas, informó 395 nuevos casos positivos (equivale a 659 por cada 100.000) del 5 al 18 de noviembre, y una tasa de positividad de la prueba del 12.4 por ciento.

Se recomienda limitar el contagio de la enfermedad pidiendo a las personas practiquen las guías de seguridad come el usar cubrebocas, lavarse las manos con frecuencia, limitar los viajes tanto como sea posible y, sobre todo, quedarse en casa cuando están enfermos.

State moves Garfield County to ‘high-risk’ orange on COVID-19 dial

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 Cumulative stats for November 16, 2020

November 16, 2020, RIFLE, COLO – The following are updated statistics from Grand River Health:

Grand River Health COVID-19 Cumulative Stats 11/16/2020:

Number of individuals tested: 4,825
Positive results: 395
Pending results: 102
New Positives since 11/10/20: 61
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 18
Patients Transferred: 5
Patients Discharged: 9

Reported numbers are from Grand River Health only and could change at any time.

All Clinic services, hospital and specialty services are open. All patients will be screened appropriately and patients with current symptoms will be scheduled for appointments in the respiratory clinic. 

All appointments can be made by calling 625-1100. Patients are asked to wear a mask while in the facility.

Updated Grand River Health COVID-19 Cumulative stats for November 16, 2020

Garfield County COVID-19 update

Public Health exceeds capacity 
11.16.20

Garfield County Public Health has 155 open cases right now. These are cases that have not received a complete contact investigation. The daily number of cases has now exceeded the highest previous levels seen in July. You are more at risk of contracting the virus now than at any other point in the pandemic.

Case investigators are now beyond their capacity with over 50 cases reported each day. We are now prioritizing case investigations based on age and occupation (if known), and potential outbreaks (if known), schools, and childcare. Once we work through the priority groups, we then contact the remaining cases. 

We are relying on everyone to act without waiting for public health intervention: 

  • If you are sick or test positive = isolate for 10 days beginning with your first day of symptoms.
  • If you are exposed to someone who has COVID-like symptoms or tests positive = quarantine at home for 14 days starting with the last day you had contact with the ill person. 

Garfield County currently has a rotation of 13 case investigators. However, only 3-4 are dedicated to tracing on any day. Tracers work seven days per week trying to call everyone who tests positive for COVID-19.

It is of critical importance to us that we create a rapport with each affected person. Public Health wants affected individuals first to know that we care about them and are concerned for their health. We also want them to know what isolation means and the actions they need to take. Contact tracers want to ensure that people have access to a personal connection and get their questions answered.

However, cases are exceeding previously seen levels and the health department is beginning to prioritize cases due to the high volume. 

Holiday Gatherings

The holidays are about family, and no one wants to be sick or in the hospital, especially this time of year. Keep the holidays small and before you gather, take a 14-day break; limiting non-essential outings and get-togethers and make a promise to wear masks and stay distanced. Take care of those that you love by not sharing illness. It is far too easy to spread COVID. While most people recover, some have lasting health impacts that alter normal life for many months.

NEW COVID-19 Data Page 

The Garfield County COVID-19 Data website has been updated to provide an even more interactive and easy to use format with data including:

Garfield County Overall COVID-19 Score

  • Weekly projection of spread in Garfield County
    • Based on 7 factors: cumulative incidence rate, average test positivity, and hospital capacity, along with an assessment of community spread, cases interviewed, days before seeking testing and test turnaround time
    • Weighted by Garfield County Public Health. Overall Score measurements are weighted differently than the CDPHE State Dial

The CDPHE State Dial

  • List of the current measures that are in place
    • Shows the ‘level of openness’ for Garfield County
    • The level is moved through a process with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) and may not ‘move’ as quickly as the Overall Score
    • Based on 3 factors: cumulative incidence rate, average test positivity, and hospital capacity
    • Weighted by CDPHE

How to receive notifications and Garfield County COVID-19 information

Click the red COVID-19 symptoms, testing, and data rectangle on the Garfield County homepage 

Sign up for press releases or look up past releases at www.garfieldcounty.net 

Facebook @Garfieldhealth

Concerns or Questions

If you have a question or public health concern please email publichealthinfo@garfield-county.com or call 970-625-5200 ext. 8120.

Hot topics

Garfield County Public Health has received 74 concerned phone calls in the months of September and October regarding public safety related to COVID. Of those calls, 88 percent were either directly or in part related to concerns about people not wearing masks, and the remainder were about a lack of social distancing or capacities being exceeded at local businesses.

Hot Spots for Virus

As the weather cools down, COVID numbers are going up. When we have friends and family over or see the same co-workers each day, we assume that we are all healthy. Unfortunately, the virus spreads most before symptoms start and this has caused our recent case spike. 

Don’t drop your guard, even with those you love being with. Social gatherings with 10 people or less from no more than two households can get together, but enjoy each other with some personal space and sport a mask. 

Rules for Personal Gatherings and Public Events:

Having a get together with no more than 10 people from no more than two households applies to personal gatherings. It is important to clarify that public events fall under specific guidance and must use the State social distancing calculator to determine how many people can attend. 

Because the regulations are confusing, Public Health is available to help ensure that you have a great and safe event. Call or email questions to publichealthinfo@garfield-county.com or call 970-625-5200 x 8120. 

For events with approximately 40 people or more, the event organizer should fill out a business social distancing plan and complete an event coordinator form

Local COVID burden

COVID has placed a huge burden on our community, economy, and schools. The economy cannot bounce back until people feel safe enough to patronize businesses and restaurants again. We need to have fewer students become ill with COVID so that more students can get back to learning in person.

These things are interconnected and limiting the spread of COVID-19 is the best path forward to returning to a normal life. A good plan is to envision where our economy and community can be six months to a year from now and take the logical steps to make that vision a reality. 

Everyone has a role to play and the good news is that much of our community is doing its part to move towards a healthier future. 

Make your quarantine plan before it happens / what does quarantine really mean?

With a high volume of COVID spread in the community, it is important to make your COVID plan now, before you or someone in your household is affected. 

Receiving an exposure notification or notice to quarantine means that you had enough exposure to COVID and that quarantine is necessary. It does not mean that you need a COVID test unless you develop symptoms. Testing too early may not yield accurate results. Quarantine means staying at home for 14 days, limiting contact with others, and monitoring yourself for symptoms. The only things that can end a 14-day quarantine are when those 14-days have passed and no symptoms have started, or you become ill with COVID and must begin isolation for 10-days.  

 It is hard to imagine how COVID will impact you until you are directly affected. But we need to begin to think about our personal COVID plan. What will you do if you receive a COVID exposure notification or are told to quarantine?

Quarantine means:  

  • The person should not go to stores, school, social gatherings, sports, or church for the full 14-day period. It is all right to spend time outside, but if you encounter others who are not in your household, stay six feet away and wear a mask. 
    • Quarantine only ends after the 14-day period when no symptoms have started or if COVID symptoms develop. If symptoms develop, get tested within 1-2 days and begin isolation following the CDPHE guidelines.  
    • Other household members of a person in quarantine are considered ‘contacts of a contact’ and are not required to quarantine. However, everyone should continue to monitor symptoms and seek medical evaluation if symptoms develop.   
    • Quarantine at home does not mean isolating the person from the rest of the family but wearing masks and distancing within the home are recommended during this time. 

____________________________________________________________________________

ACTUALIZACIÓN SOBRE COVID-19
16 de noviembre, 2020

Salud Pública Supera la Capacidad 

Salud Pública del Condado Garfield tiene 155 casos abiertos en este momento. Estos son casos que no han recibido una investigación de contacto completa. El número de casos ha superado los niveles altos que anteriormente se observaron en julio. Ahora hay más riesgo de contraer el virus que en cualquier otro momento de la pandemia. 

Los investigadores de casos están más allá de su capacidad con más de 50 casos reportados diariamente. Estamos dando prioridad para investigar casos basados en edad y ocupación (si se conocen) y los posibles brotes (si se conocen), escuelas y cuidado infantil. Una vez que se trabaje con grupos prioritarios, contactaremos a los casos restantes. 

Confiamos en que todos actúen sin esperar una intervención de salud pública: 

  • Si está enfermo o da positivo a la prueba = aislé durante 10 días a partir del primer día de síntomas.
  • Si está expuesto a alguien que tiene síntomas similares a COVID o da positivo a la prueba = haga cuarentena en casa durante 14 días a partir del último día que tuvo contacto con la persona enferma. 

El Condado Garfield tiene actualmente una rotación de 13 investigadores de casos. Sin embargo, solo 3-4 se dedican al seguimiento en cualquier día. Los rastreadores trabajan los siete días de la semana tratando de llamar a todos los que dan positivo a COVID-19.

Para nosotros es de vital importancia crear una relación con cada persona afectada. Salud Pública quiere que las personas afectadas sepan que nos preocupamos por ellos y nos preocupamos por su salud. También queremos que sepan lo que significa el aislamiento y las acciones que deben tomar. Los rastreadores de contactos quieren asegurarse de que las personas tengan acceso a una conexión personal y obtengan respuestas a sus preguntas.

Sin embargo, los casos están superando a niveles vistos anteriormente y el departamento de salud está comenzando a priorizar casos debido al alto volumen. 

Reuniones Durante Días Festivos

Las vacaciones se tratan de familia y nadie quiere estar enfermo o en el hospital, especialmente en esta época del año. Mantenga reuniones pequeñas y antes de reunirse, tómese un descanso de 14 días; limite salidas y reuniones no esenciales y prométase usar cubrebocas y manténgase alejado. Cuide a sus seres queridos sin compartir la enfermedad. Es demasiado fácil contagiar el COVID. La mayoría de las personas se recuperan, pero algunas tienen efectos duraderos de salud que alteran la vida normal durante muchos meses.

NUEVA Página de Datos Sobre COVID-19 

El Sitio Web con datos sobre COVID-19 del Condado Garfield se ha actualizado para  proporcionar un formato aún más interactivo y fácil de usar con datos que incluyen:

Puntaje general sobre COVID-19 en el Condado Garfield

  • Proyección semanal de contagio en el Condado de Garfield
    • Es basado en 7 factores: tasa de incidencia acumulada, promedio de pruebas positivas y capacidad hospitalaria, junto con una evaluación sobre el contagio comunitario, casos entrevistados, días que se toman para solicitar una prueba y el tiempo que se toma para recibir resultados de la prueba.
    • Moderado por Salud Pública del Condado Garfield. El puntaje general se mide de manera diferente a la del Sistema de Indicadores del CDPHE

Sistema de Indicadores del CDPHE

  • Lista de las medidas que están en vigor
    • Muestra el “nivel de apertura” del Condado de Garfield
    • El nivel se mueve a través de un proceso con el Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE) y es posible que no “se mueva” tan rápido como la puntuación general
    • Basado en 3 factores: tasa de incidencia acumulada, promedio de resultados positivos y capacidad hospitalaria
    • Moderado por CDPHE

Cómo recibir notificaciones e información sobre COVID-19 del Condado Garfield

Haga clic en el rectángulo rojo de síntomas, pruebas y datos de COVID-19 en la página de inicio del Condado Garfield 

Regístrese para recibir comunicados de prensa o busque comunicados anteriores en www.garfieldcounty.net

En Facebook @Garfieldhealth

Inquietudes o Preguntas

Si tiene alguna pregunta o inquietud de salud pública, envíe un correo electrónico a publichealthinfo@garfield-county.com o llame al 970-625-5200 ext. 8120.

Temas de Importancia

Salud Pública del Condado Garfield ha recibido 74 llamadas telefónicas preocupadas en los meses de septiembre y octubre con respecto a la seguridad pública relacionada con COVID. De esas llamadas, el 88 por ciento se relacionó directa o en parte con preocupaciones sobre personas que no usaban cubrebocas, y el resto se debió a la falta de distanciamiento social o al exceso de capacidad en negocios locales.

Lugares de Contagio al Virus

A medida que el clima se enfría, los números de COVID aumentan. Cuando tenemos amigos y familiares o vemos a los mismos compañeros de trabajo todos los días, asumimos que todos estamos sanos. Desafortunadamente, el virus se propaga antes de que comiencen los síntomas y esto ha causado nuestro reciente aumento de casos. No baje la guardia, incluso con aquellos con quienes ama pasar tiempo. Las reuniones sociales con 10 personas o menos de no más de dos hogares pueden reunirse, pero disfrutar el uno del otro con un poco de espacio personal y con un cubrebocas. 

Reglas para Reuniones Personales y Eventos Públicos:

Tener una reunión con no más de 10 personas de no más de dos hogares se aplica a las reuniones personales. Es importante aclarar que los eventos públicos se rigen por una guía especifica y deben utilizar la calculadora de distanciamiento social del Estado para determinar cuántas personas pueden asistir. 

Debido a que las regulaciones son confusas, Salud Pública está disponible para ayudar a garantizar que tenga un excelente evento y seguro. Llame o envíe sus preguntas por correo electrónico a publichealthinfo@garfield-county.com o llame al 970-625-5200 x 8120.

Para eventos con aproximadamente 40 personas o más, el organizador del evento debe llenar un plan de distanciamiento social para negocios y llenar un formulario de coordinador de eventos

Carga local de COVID

COVID ha colocado una gran carga en nuestra comunidad, economía y escuelas. La economía no puede recuperarse hasta que la gente se sienta lo suficientemente segura como para volver a frecuentar negocios y restaurantes. Necesitamos que menos estudiantes se enfermen con COVID para que más estudiantes puedan volver a aprender en persona.

Estas cosas están interconectadas y limitar la propagación de COVID-19 es el mejor camino para regresar a una vida normal. Un buen plan es imaginar donde nuestra economía y comunidad pueden estar dentro de seis meses a un año y tomar los pasos lógicos para hacer realidad esa visión.

Todos tienen un papel que desempeñar y la buena noticia es que gran parte de nuestra comunidad está haciendo su parte para avanzar hacia un futuro más saludable. 

Haga su plan de cuarentena antes de que suceda / ¿qué significa realmente la cuarentena?

Con un alto volumen de contagio de COVID en la comunidad, es importante hacer su plan de COVID ahora, antes de que usted o alguien de su hogar se vea afectado. 

Recibir una notificación que estuvo expuesto o un aviso de cuarentena significa que tuvo suficiente exposición al COVID y que la cuarentena es necesaria. No significa que necesite una prueba de COVID a menos que desarrolle síntomas. Hacerse la prueba demasiado pronto, puede ofrecer resultados no precisos. La cuarentena significa quedarse en casa durante 14 días, limitar el contacto con los demás y monitorearse por síntomas. Lo único que puede poner fin a una cuarentena de 14 días es cuando hayan pasado esos 14 días y no hayan comenzado los síntomas, o si se enferma de COVID debe comenzar el aislamiento durante 10 días. 

Es difícil imaginar cómo le afectará COVID hasta que se vea directamente afectado. Pero tenemos que empezar a pensar en nuestro plan de COVID personal. ¿Qué hará si recibe una notificación de exposición a COVID o se le indica que se ponga en cuarentena?

Cuarentena significa:  

  • La persona no debe ir a tiendas, escuelas, reuniones sociales, deportes o la iglesia durante el período completo de 14 días. Está bien pasar tiempo al aire libre, pero si se topa con otras personas que no son parte de su hogar, manténgase a dos metros de distancia y use un cubrebocas. 
    • La cuarentena solo termina después del período de 14 días cuando no han empezado síntomas o si se desarrollan síntomas de COVID. Si se presentan síntomas, hágase la prueba dentro de 1 a 2 días y empiece el aislamiento siguiendo las guías del CDPHE.  
    • Los demás miembros del hogar de una persona en cuarentena se consideran “contactos de un contacto” y no están obligados a ponerse en cuarentena. Sin embargo, todos deben monitorear por síntomas y buscar una evaluación médica si se desarrollan.    
    • La cuarentena no significa aislar a la persona del resto de la familia, pero se recomienda usar cubrebocas y distanciarse dentro del hogar durante este tiempo. 
Garfield County COVID-19 update

Garfield County Public Health exceeds capacity

COMMUNITY NOTICE
11.16.20

Garfield County Public Health has 155 open cases right now. These are cases that have not received a complete contact investigation. The daily number of cases has now exceeded the highest previous levels seen in July. You are more at risk of contracting the virus now than at any other point in the pandemic.

Case investigators are now beyond their capacity with over 50 cases reported each day. We are now prioritizing case investigations based on age and occupation (if known), and potential outbreaks (if known), schools, and childcare. Once we work through the priority groups, we then contact the remaining cases. 

We are relying on everyone to act without waiting for public health intervention: 

  • If you are sick or test positive = isolate for 10 days beginning with your first day of symptoms.
  • If you are exposed to someone who has COVID-like symptoms or tests positive = quarantine at home for 14 days starting with the last day you had contact with the ill person. 

Garfield County currently has a rotation of 13 case investigators. However, only 3-4 are dedicated to tracing on any day. Tracers work seven days per week trying to call everyone who tests positive for COVID-19.

It is of critical importance to us that we create a rapport with each affected person. Public Health wants affected individuals first to know that we care about them and are concerned for their health. We also want them to know what isolation means and the actions they need to take. Contact tracers want to ensure that people have access to a personal connection and get their questions answered.

However, cases are exceeding previously seen levels and the health department is beginning to prioritize cases due to the high volume. 

_____________________________________________________________________

Salud Pública Supera la Capacidad

Salud Pública del Condado Garfield tiene 155 casos abiertos en este momento. Estos son casos que no han recibido una investigación de contacto completa. El número de casos ha superado los niveles altos que anteriormente se observaron en julio. Ahora hay más riesgo de contraer el virus que en cualquier otro momento de la pandemia.

Los investigadores de casos están más allá de su capacidad con más de 50 casos reportados diariamente. Estamos dando prioridad para investigar casos basados en edad y ocupación (si se conocen) y los posibles brotes (si se conocen), escuelas y cuidado infantil. Una vez que se trabaje con grupos prioritarios, contactaremos a los casos restantes.

Confiamos en que todos actúen sin esperar una intervención de salud pública:

· Si está enfermo o da positivo a la prueba = aislé durante 10 días a partir del primer día de síntomas.

· Si está expuesto a alguien que tiene síntomas similares a COVID o da positivo a la prueba = haga cuarentena en casa durante 14 días a partir del último día que tuvo contacto con la persona enferma.

El Condado Garfield tiene actualmente una rotación de 13 investigadores de casos. Sin embargo, solo 3-4 se dedican al seguimiento en cualquier día. Los rastreadores trabajan los siete días de la semana tratando de llamar a todos los que dan positivo a COVID-19.

Para nosotros es de vital importancia crear una relación con cada persona afectada. Salud Pública quiere que las personas afectadas sepan que nos preocupamos por ellos y nos preocupamos por su salud. También queremos que sepan lo que significa el aislamiento y las acciones que deben tomar. Los rastreadores de contactos quieren asegurarse de que las personas tengan acceso a una conexión personal y obtengan respuestas a sus preguntas.

Sin embargo, los casos están superando a niveles vistos anteriormente y el departamento de salud está comenzando a priorizar casos debido al alto volumen.

Garfield County Public Health exceeds capacity

CDPHE: COVID exposure notifications enabled by one million Coloradans

Governor Jared Polis announced that more than one million Coloradans have enabled the statewide COVID-19 Exposure Notifications system launched on October 25 by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) in partnership with Google and Apple.
Studies show that at just 15% adoption of exposure notification technologies, you can see a significant decrease in COVID-19 infections and deaths. Colorado is now at 17% adoption, and as adoption increases, so does the potential impact.

“By signing up for Exposure Notifications on your phone, 1 million Coloradans are stepping up and doing their part to help limit risk to family, friends, and coworkers from the deadly COVID virus. We are at a pivotal moment in this pandemic, and opting in to this service at addyourphone.com helps keep our families and communities safe and our economy running,” said Governor Jared Polis.

CDPHE has also acted quickly to innovate and optimize processes for CO Exposure Notifications.

If you test positive for COVID-19 in Colorado, public health authorities will send you a one-time, anonymous verification code to be entered into CO Exposure Notifications. Because of the dramatic surge in COVID-19 cases, users were experiencing a wait for their verification code as local case investigators and contact tracers worked tirelessly to manage the overwhelming flood of new cases.

To reduce the burden on local public health agencies, CDPHE quickly stood up a new process that will now text a one-time verification code directly to all people with confirmed positive test results when they are reported to the Colorado Electronic Disease Reporting System (CEDRS).

“Since automating this process on November 9, we have gone from sending an average of 20 verification codes per day, to sending over 5,000 per day,” said Sarah Tuneberg, Lead of Colorado’s Containment and Testing Team and CO Exposure Notifications Lead. “Thanks to this quick action, Coloradans will get the information they need quickly without further overwhelming our health workers. This is a big win for Colorado!”

CO Exposure Notifications complements existing statewide health safety protocols without compromising the privacy of Coloradans. Exposure Notification systems like these are critical to preventing further spread of COVID-19.

We encourage Coloradans to opt into CO Exposure Notifications at addyourphone.com.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

________________________________________________

CDPHE: 1 millón de habitantes de Colorado activaron las notificaciones de exposición

El gobernador Jared Polis hoy anunció que más de un millón de habitantes de Colorado activaron el sistema de Notificaciones de Exposición al COVID-19 en todo el estado, que fue lanzado el 25 de octubre por el Departamento de Salud Pública y Medio Ambiente de Colorado (CDPHE, por sus siglas en inglés) en colaboración con Google y Apple.
Los estudios (en inglés) demuestran que a tan solo un 15% de la implementación de tecnologías de notificaciones de exposición, se puede ver un declive en infecciones y muertes a causa del COVID-19. Colorado ha llegado a un total del 17% de su implementación, y a medida que la implementación aumenta, también aumenta su impacto potencial.

“Al inscribirse a las Notificaciones de Exposición en su teléfono, 1 millón de habitantes de Colorado están dando el paso al frente y haciendo su parte para poder ayudar reducir el riesgo en sus familias, amigos y compañeros de trabajo ante este virus mortal del COVID. Estamos en un momento crucial en esta pandemia e inscribirse a este servicio en addyourphone.com ayuda a cuidar a nuestras familias y comunidades, además de mantener nuestra economía en funcionamiento”, dijo el Gobernador Jared Polis.

El CDPHE también ha actuado rápidamente para innovar y optimizar los procesos para las Notificaciones de Exposición en CO.

Si su prueba de detección del COVID-19 da positivo en Colorado, las autoridades de salud pública le enviarán un único código anónimo de verificación que deberá ingresar al sistema de Notificaciones de Exposición en CO. Debido a un gran incremento de casos del COVID-19, los usuarios estaban experimentando un tiempo de espera para recibir su código de verificación, mientras que investigadores locales de casos y rastreadores de contactos trabajaron incansablemente para manejar la inmensa cantidad de nuevos casos.

Para reducir la carga sobre las agencias locales de salud pública, el CDPHE rápidamente creó un nuevo proceso donde se enviará un único código de verificación directamente a todas las personas que han dado positivo en su prueba de detección y que ha sido reportado al Sistema Electrónico de Reporte de Colorado (CEDRS, por sus siglas en inglés).

“Desde la automatización de este proceso el 9 de noviembre, hemos pasado de enviar un promedio de 20 códigos de verificación por día, a más de 5,000 por día”, dijo Sarah Tuneberg, Líder del Equipo de Contención y Pruebas de Laboratorio de Colorado y del sistema de Notificaciones de Exposición de Colorado. “Gracias a esta intervención rápida, los habitantes de Colorado obtendrán la información que necesitan rápidamente sin abrumar a nuestros profesionales de atención médica. ¡Esto es un gran triunfo para Colorado”!

Las Notificaciones de Exposición en Colorado complementan los protocolos existentes del estado sin comprometer la privacidad de los habitantes de Colorado. Sistemas de Notificación de Exposición como este, son cruciales a la hora de prevenir una mayor propagación del COVID-19

Alentamos a los habitantes de Colorado a que opten por recibir las Notificaciones de Exposición en Colorado en utilizatutelefono.com.

Continúe manteniéndose informado visitando covid19.colorado.gov.



CDPHE: COVID exposure notifications enabled by one million Coloradans

CDPHE: Free and convenient testing sites available across Colorado

As demand for COVID-19 testing increases, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment wants to remind Coloradans that there are numerous state-sponsored community testing sites across the state. They are free, convenient, and do not require a doctor’s note, identification, or insurance. There are more than 50 free community testing sites across the state, as well as dozens of locations offered by private providers. The state’s website has a list of locations.

Anyone who needs a test is encouraged to get one. Anyone who has symptoms should get tested immediately and isolate for at least 10 days from onset and until they are fever-free for 24 hours (without the help of medication), and their symptoms are improving. In some more severe cases, medical providers may recommend isolation for longer. Anyone who has been exposed to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19 should quarantine for 14 days and get tested seven days after the exposure. A negative test should not release someone quarantine because symptoms might not appear for up to 14 days after exposure.

The following community testing sites are free to the public:
(Many of the sites request advance registration to speed the testing process, but it is not required.)

Federal Heights: Water World, 8801 N. Pecos St. Federal Heights, CO 80260 (parking lot adjacent to W. 90th Ave.)
Open Monday-Sunday from 8 a.m.– 7 p.m.

Aurora: Aurora Center for Active Adults, 30 Del Mar Circle Aurora, CO 80010 (in the parking lot)
Open Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m.– 5 p.m.

Centennial: Centennial Center Park, 13050 E. Peakview Ave. Centennial, CO 80111 (east of Arapahoe Road and Peoria Street)
Open Monday-Sunday from 8 a.m.– 6 p.m.

Thornton: City of Thornton Municipal Service Center, 8651 Colorado Blvd. Thornton, CO 80229 (south of the intersection at 88th Avenue and Colorado Boulevard)
Open Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Fridays from 8 a.m.–2 p.m., and Saturdays from 9 a.m.– 5 p.m.

Fountain: 6436 US Highway 85-87 Colorado Springs, CO 80911 (formerly known as the Beckett Event Center)
Open Monday-Friday from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.

Falcon/Peyton: Rock Island Regional Trailhead, 7281 McLaughlin Road Peyton, CO 80831
Open Tuesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Monument: 25 Jefferson St. Monument, CO 80132 (southwest parking lot at the corner of Lincoln Avenue and N. Jefferson Street in the church rectory)
Open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Colorado Springs: Citadel Mall, 750 Citadel Drive E. Colorado Springs, CO 80909 (parking lot just south of JCPenney)
Open Monday-Saturday from 8 a.m – 5 p.m.

Mesa County: Mesa County Fairgrounds, 2785 US-50, Grand Junction, CO 81503
Open Tuesday-Saturday from 10 a.m.– 4 p.m.

Pueblo: State Fairgrounds, 1001 Beulah Ave., Pueblo, CO 81004
(enter through Gate 4 off Mesa and Gaylord avenues
Open Monday-Friday and every second and fourth Saturday, 10 a.m. -7 p.m.

The following test sites require advanced registration:

All City Stadium
*South 1495 S Race St., Denver, CO 80210
M, T, W: 11:30 a.m – 5 p.m.
Th, F: 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Aurora Public Schools Professional Learning Office & Conference Ctr
5771 E 1st Ave., Aurora, CO 80011
M, T: 7 a.m. – 1 p.m.
W, Th, Fr : 12 – 5 p.m.

Mountain Range HS
12500 Huron St., Westminster, CO 80234
M-F 12 – 5 p.m.

North High School
3125 Eliot St., Denver, CO 80211
M-W: 7 a.m. – 1p.m.
Th, F: 11:30 a.m. – 5p.m.

St. Vrain Valley Schools Innovation Center
33 Quail Road, Longmont, CO 80504
M-F: 12 – 5 p.m.

Instructional Support Facility / Cherry Creek High School ISF:
5416 S. Riviera Way Aurora, CO 80015 /
CCHS: 4700 South Yosemite St., Greenwood Village, CO, USA
M: 12 – 5 p.m.
T: 7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.
W, Th: 12 – 5 p.m.
F: 7:30 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Colorado Mesa University
1280 Cannell Ave.*
M-F 4-5:30 p.m.

Please check out more community testing sites in your area at covidtest.colorado.gov/map.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE: Free and convenient testing sites available across Colorado