CDPHE helps increase flu vaccinations, decreasing flu cases this season

The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has prioritized the importance of flu vaccination this flu season, as requested by Governor Polis, as a way to minimize additional stress and burden on Colorado’s health care system during the COVID-19 pandemic. CDPHE implemented activities to leverage existing and new partnerships to expand access to flu vaccination, performed targeted programming to increase flu vaccination rates, and implemented policies that promoted increased vaccine access and patient engagement.

As of January 12, 2021, more than two million Coloradans have gotten their flu vaccine, a 16.3% increase from the same time last year. The increased number of flu vaccinations, in conjunction with public health protocols that mitigate the spread of COVID-19, correspond to an overall drop in the number of people presenting with flu-like illness at outpatient clinics and emergency departments. These contributing factors have also resulted in a significant decrease in flu-related hospitalizations. 

Outpatient clinics have reported that 0.71% of their patients have had flu-like illness this season, well below the seasonal baseline of 5.05%. Similarly, emergency departments have seen flu-like illness in just 0.62% of patient visits, with a baseline of 2.54%. So far, only 18 patients have been hospitalized with the flu this season compared to 3,546 flu-related hospitalizations reported between September 29, 2019 and May 23, 2020.

“The impressive numbers from this flu season so far show that Coloradans have been taking necessary actions to protect their health and the health of their communities,” said Jill Hunsaker Ryan, executive director, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE). “But while flu activity is unusually low at this time, it may still increase in the coming months. It’s not too late to get the flu shot, and it’s more important than ever so we can maintain our hospital capacity through the end of the COVID-19 pandemic. We recommend everyone age 6 months and older get the flu vaccine if they have not done so already. It’s the best way to protect against the flu and its potentially serious complications, and prevent further strain on our health care systems. ”

The flu season lasts from late September to May, and typically peaks around February or March. CDPHE believes that a combination of higher flu vaccine uptake and adoption of public health protocols has been limiting transmission of the flu this season, and experts note that it is not circulating as predominantly as in previous years.

Because some of the symptoms of flu and COVID-19 are similar, it may be hard to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone. It’s important to get tested for COVID-19 if you have symptoms or if you think you may have been exposed. For more information about getting tested, see CDPHE’s Testing for COVID-19 webpage.

To find out where you can get a flu vaccine, visit vaccinefinder.org.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov.

CDPHE helps increase flu vaccinations, decreasing flu cases this season

Garfield County COVID-19 summary

Garfield County, CO – Garfield County is averaging approximately 41 COVID-19 cases per day. This is significantly below the levels seen towards the middle of December, where the county was averaging 68 cases per day.

Test turnaround time is currently averaging 2.3 days from collection to notification. The desired number of days is two, therefore test turnaround time in the county is generally good.

The incidence rate, while high, at 892.5 per 100,000 persons for the last 14-day period, is moving generally in a declining direction.

The test positivity rate had one day last week above ten percent, but numbers below that are an indicator that Garfield County is testing enough people and finding more cases earlier than at the end of November or beginning of December.

People exposed to COVID-19 on New Year’s Eve would be most contagious between January 3 – 7. Based on incubation periods and test turnaround times, the health department will know how the holidays affected cases by next week.

Public Health, working with hospital partners, hopes to report the number of vaccines administered each week. Garfield County has been vaccinating 1A and limited 1B categories. 4.8% of Garfield County residents have received their first dose.

Geographic AreaTotal CasesCurrently HospitalizedDeathsRecovered
Global90,074,323Not Available1,932,05349,923,251
United States22,300,696130,781363,598N/A
Colorado358,9479775,19018,891
Garfield County4,444N/A33 confirmed, and 3 being investigatedN/A
Eagle County3,780N/A14N/A
Pitkin County1,488N/A4N/A
Mesa County10.00841875,305

*Statistics from Johns Hopkins University, covidtracking.com, and the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment

Cases since last week

  • 299 cases reported/added since last week for a 7-day rolling average of 42.7 cases added per day
  • Dates with most cases added:
    • 1/7: 83
    • 1/5: 54

Vaccinations

  • Public Health is working with hospital partners to obtain the number of vaccinations administered. These numbers include Phase 1A, 1B, and 70+:
    • Valley View Hospital (through 1/8): 2,078
    • Grand River (through 1/8): 880
    • Total amount of vaccine allocated to Garfield County to date: 2,915

Deaths

  • 33 confirmed COVID-19 related deaths, 3 pending investigation
  • 0 new deaths reported since last week

State dial information (week dates)

  • Two-week incidence:
    • Monday: 797.8
    • Tuesday: 807.7
    • Wednesday: 811.1
    • Thursday: 807.7
    • Friday: 877.5
    • Saturday: 924.1
    • Sunday: 892.5
      • Increases are likely because of the Christmas and New Year’s holidays, though these increases are less of a surge than those experienced in November.
  • Hospitalizations, days with stable or declining hospitalizations:
    • Monday: 8
    • Tuesday: 9
    • Wednesday: 7
    • Thursday: 8
    • Friday: 9
    • Saturday: 9
    • Sunday: 10
  • Test positivity:
    • Monday: 9.4%
    • Tuesday: 9.4%
    • Wednesday: 9.7%
    • Thursday: 9.3%
    • Friday: 10.3
    • Saturday: 9.7%
    • Sunday: 9.9%
      • Staying under 10%, especially during the holidays period is a positive for Garfield County numbers.
Garfield County COVID-19 summary

UPDATED VALLEY VIEW COVID-19 CUMULATIVE STATS

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, COLO – The following are updated statistics from Valley View:

Valley View COVID-19 Cumulative Stats 1/12/21
Specimens collected thru Valley View: 18,062
Positive results: 1,514
Pending results:   17
Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outbreak began: 199
Admitted patients discharged: 173

Definitions:
Specimens collected: These are specimens collected by Valley View providers that are tested by Valley View’s laboratory in Glenwood Springs or sent to an outside laboratory to conduct COVID-19 testing. This is a cumulative number.

Positive results: These are the number of positive COVID-19 results returned from the Valley View specimens tested. This definition is updated on April 21 to clarify that the positive results represent positive patients. This is a cumulative number.

Patients admitted with COVID-19 since outreach began: Patients with a positive COVID-19 test who have been hospitalized at Valley View. This is a cumulative number.

Admitted patients discharged: Of admitted patients with a positive COVID-19 test, number who have been discharged from Valley View Hospital. Patients may be discharged to recover at home, to hospice or to psychiatric care. This is a cumulative number.  

Additional Questions:
“From whom is Valley View collecting specimens?” Valley View is testing:

  • Patients who are symptomatic and have been referred by their primary care provider.
  • Patients undergoing medically necessary surgery.
  • Patients undergoing designated procedures that are high risk for aerosol generation.
  • Patients with a referral from their primary care provider for a test needed for work or travel.

“What kind of PCR test does Valley View offer?” Currently, Valley View has a nasopharyngeal PCR test. For the nasopharyngeal swab, a special swab of the nose occurs, it is then placed in a tube and sent for testing. 

“What is the difference between the number of patients admitted and number of patients discharged?” The difference between the number of patients and admitted patients discharged represents current hospitalized patients, patients transferred to other hospitals or those who have passed away. For example, if there are 21 patients admitted and 16 discharged, the difference is five. This is a cumulative number representing the entirety of Valley View’s efforts caring for COVID-19 patients. Therefore five total patients are hospitalized, have been transferred to a hospital as they need a higher level of care or, unfortunately, have passed away. Valley View will not offer additional details so as to protect their privacy.

“What is the turnaround for test results?”  At this point, Valley View is receiving test results same-day to 48 hours. The variability in time is due to the type of test ordered by the provider. For example, an individual experiencing a medical emergency may require a rapid test.

“The number of positive tests is not the same as admitted patients. Why?” Not all positive patients require hospitalization. For patients with mild symptoms, his/her doctor may recommend that they recover at home with specific instructions (e.g. isolation, monitor symptoms). Other positive patients may be very ill and need hospitalization.  

“What is the status of these individual hospitalized patients?” Per the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), Valley View will not speak to the specific status of an individual patient.

UPDATED VALLEY VIEW COVID-19 CUMULATIVE STATS

Roaring Fork High School cancels in-person learning January 12

Roaring Fork High School sent out communication earlier today announcing that in-person school would be canceled Tuesday, January 12 after four students exhibited concerning symptoms at school, including nausea, headaches, and vomiting, within a short period of time. 

The announcement stated: “Out of an abundance of caution, we are canceling in-person school at RFHS on Tuesday, January 12. Athletic practices are canceled today January 11 and tomorrow January 12.” 

The students were immediately sent to the health tent for evaluation and then sent home and encouraged to seek medical attention and get a Covid test as these are all possible Covid-19 symptoms. 

However, because this situation does not present as a typical Covid-19 outbreak, the school immediately contacted the fire department to check the environment and were given the all-clear. The school closed off the areas of the building where the students presented symptoms and had windows open in all rooms. Tomorrow will be an opportunity for school staff to deep clean and make sure the environment is safe. 

Teachers for in-person classes will be in touch with students tomorrow with asynchronous learning opportunities. The school plans to resume in-person learning on Wednesday, January 13. 

Roaring Fork High School cancels in-person learning January 12

Western Garfield County testing closing early today, January 11, at 3 pm instead of 4:30 pm

Shipping center hour changes require the site to close at 3 pm in order to send tests to Curative lab on time

Garfield County, CO – The Western Garfield County testing in Rifle will close early today, ending at 3 pm. The shipping center used by the testing site is closing early and all tests must make the cutoff to be sent to the lab.

________________________________

Las pruebas del Oeste del Condado de Garfield cerrará temprano hoy, 11 de Enero a las 3 pm en lugar de las 4:30 pm

Los cambios en el horario del centro de envío requieren que el sitio cierre a las 3 pm para poder enviar las pruebas a tiempo al laboratorio de Curative

Condado de Garfield, CO – Las pruebas del Oeste del Condado de Garfield en Rifle cerrarán temprano hoy, terminando a las 3 pm. El centro de envío utilizado por el sitio de pruebas está cerrando temprano y todas las pruebas deben cumplir con el límite para ser enviadas al laboratorio.

_________________________________

Western Garfield Free COVID testing is available though a Curative mobile van location that will be available each week in Parachute, Rifle and New Castle as long as there is community demand. Testing is at no cost, does not require a doctor’s note, identification, or insurance.

While walk-ins are welcome, online pre-registration is highly encouraged. Register here:

Elk Creek Elementary School – mobile van

Sundays 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., January – March

804 W Main St., New Castle, 81647

https://curative.com/sites/17935/walkup#9/39.573/-107.5417

Bea Underwood Elementary School – mobile van

Mondays 9 a.m. – 11 a.m., January – March

0741 Tamarisk Trail, Parachute, 81635

https://curative.com/sites/17936/walkup#9/39.441/-108.0382

Garfield County Fairgrounds- mobile van

Mondays 12:30 – 4:30 p.m., January – March

1001 Railroad Ave., Rifle, 81650

https://curative.com/sites/17938/walkup#9/39.5401/-107.7851

Curative offers an oral-fluid swab testing — an alternative method to nasopharyngeal or brain swabs in testing for COVID-19 with the highest possible clinical sensitivity. It is an observed and directed, self-collected test, which minimizes the in-person contact and risk of transmission for all site visitors and testing professionals. Results are returned to patients within 48 hours upon receipt at the lab.

Anyone who has symptoms should get tested immediately and isolate for at least 10 days from onset until they are fever-free for 24 hours (without the help of medication), and their symptoms are improving. Anyone who has been exposed to someone with COVID-19 should get tested 5 to 7 days after exposure and quarantine.

Garfield County Public Health has a list of testing sites on the COVID-19 testing page. Symptoms include:

Fever or chills
Cough
Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
Fatigue
Muscle or body aches
Headache
New loss of taste or smell
Sore throat
Congestion or runny nose
Nausea or vomiting
Diarrhea

While testing is an important tool in the COVID-19 response, the state cautions that a negative test doesn’t mean it’s OK to meet in large gatherings or bypass other public health orders, like wearing a mask. All Coloradans need to mask up, physically distance, interact only with members of their own households, wash hands and stay home while sick.

How can I stay up to date on Garfield County COVID testing, vaccine information and data?

Garfield County Public Health is posting frequent updates in the news media, on Facebook @garfieldhealth, and on our website on the COVID & Public Health page. To navigate to the COVID & Public Health page from the main Garfield County site, click the red COVID & Public Health rectangle at the top of the page. Sign up to be notified about Garfield County COVID news at garfieldcounty.net.

Western Garfield County testing closing early today, January 11, at 3 pm instead of 4:30 pm

New guidance on timeframes and how to live with someone who is infected with COVID-19 virus

COMMUNITY ADVISORY
1.8.21

Isolation and quarantine updated guidance

GARFIELD COUNTY, CO – It can be understandably confusing for people to follow the requirements of quarantine and isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic. Quarantine takes place when an individual has been exposed to someone with COVID-19 but is experiencing no symptoms. Isolation occurs when an individual is exhibiting symptoms of illness (or has tested positive for COVID-19). Garfield County Public Health is offering new guidance on what these terms have in common and what separates the two.

Though COVID-19 has been with us since March, we know that most people don’t grasp its implications until they are directly impacted,” said Garfield County Public Health Nurse, Rachel Kappler. “Often, it isn’t until we are faced with the problem of how to actually isolate or quarantine that we really have to figure it out. Also, each situation can be a little different, so it’s important to know what to do and where to go for accurate information if you find yourself exposed to someone with COVID-19.”

Precautions you should take under BOTH quarantine and isolation:

  • Do not wait for Garfield County Public Health to contact you to begin isolation or quarantine. Public health may not be able to contact you in a timely manner due to capacity.
  • If you test positive for the COVID-19 virus, you may receive an email from public health to complete a “self-report” form. Please follow the link in the email and complete the form in a timely manner.
  • If you have COVID-19 symptoms, get tested within 1-2 days.
  • Isolate while waiting for test results to come back.
  • You may still be told to isolate or quarantine even if you have a negative test, depending on the situation. Sometimes tests yield false results, therefore, follow your physician or public health’s recommendations.

In either case, visit the Garfield County isolation and quarantine web page for more information.

Precautions you should take while in quarantine

  • Quarantine applies to people who are not sick but are at risk of becoming ill because they have been exposed to a person who has COVID-19. If you have been exposed (within 6 feet of the person and longer than 15 minutes), you need to quarantine for 14 days beginning on the last day you were exposed.
  • If at any point in quarantine you develop symptoms of illness, get tested for COVID-19, and follow isolation guidance. Most symptoms of COVID-19 in the beginning can feel like a common cold and can be mild. Common symptoms in the first few days of illness can be a headache, fatigue, body aches, runny nose, and congestion.
  • Even with a negative COVID test, you still need to quarantine for 14 days as the virus can take up to 14 days before making someone sick after close exposure.
  • If you live with a person who has COVID-19 and you cannot fully separate from them, you must wait until they complete their isolation period to begin your own quarantine. This can mean that you are in isolation/quarantine for up to 24 or more days.
  • In some cases, some individuals may discontinue quarantine before 14 days for the specific categories of work, medical visits and essential needs. This still does not clear people to resume social or non-essential activities and the following criteria must be met:

To discontinue quarantine after 7 days:

  • You must have no symptoms on day 7 into quarantine AND
  • have a negative molecular test result on day 7 in quarantine, then you may resume essential activities on day 8.

To discontinue quarantine after 10 days:

  • You must have no symptoms on day 10 of quarantine, on day 11 you may resume essential activities ONLY.

Remember, people exposed to COVID-19 are STILL at risk of developing symptoms up to 14 days after an exposure. The risk exists even if you meet criteria to discontinue quarantine at day 7 or day 10.

*School-aged children in Garfield County are not eligible for a 7-day modified quarantine option.

Precautions to take while in isolation

Isolation is used to separate people who are sick and/or people who have tested positive for COVID-19 from individuals who are not sick. You should be in isolation (stay away from others) until:

  • You have had no fever for at least 24 hours (without using medicine that reduces fevers)
    AND
  • Symptoms have improved (for example, when your cough or shortness of breath have improved)
    AND
  • At least 10 days have passed since your symptoms first appeared

If you tested positive and have no symptoms, you should be in isolation for 10 days starting with the date of your positive test. The reason you still need to isolate despite not having symptoms, is because you are contagious and can spread the virus to others.

Common questions from people who have recovered from COVID-19

Do I have immunity from the virus and for how long?

At this time, experts do not know how long someone is protected from getting sick again after recovering from COVID-19. The immunity someone gains from having an infection, called natural immunity, varies from person to person.

Should I still get the COVID vaccine, even if I had COVID?

Yes. Due to the severe health risks associated with COVID-19 and the fact that you can be re-infected with a different strain of the virus, you should get vaccinated when it becomes available. The COVID-19 vaccine was created to protect against multiple strains (or mutations) of the COVID-19 virus. This is similar in the way that there are multiple strains of influenza that circulate each year.

Do I still have to wear a mask and social distance?

Yes.It will take time after the vaccination for your body to respond and make enough antibodies to protect you. This could take up to two weeks after your last dose. 

Current information suggests that it is possible for someone who has been vaccinated against COVID-19 to still have a mild or asymptomatic infection. They may also still spread the virus to others. It is important to continue taking precautions. Continue wearing a mask and practicing physical distancing until it is safe to stop.

Individuals that get COVID-19 virus are contagious two days before they develop symptoms of illness. Wearing a mask can prevent you from spreading COVID-19 to loved ones before you realize you are sick. In individuals that have COVID-19, most are spreading the virus to their close contacts before they have symptoms (or without ever developing symptoms). This is one reason why COVID-19 virus is difficult to contain.

More contact tracers available

Garfield County has hired additional staff to conduct contact tracing to help keep up with an increase in cases this winter.

“Up until recently, there were more than 700 people who received a positive COVID-19 test results and required follow-up calls from Garfield County contact tracers. In mid-November and December, we were getting more than 100 new cases each day, making timely follow-up nearly impossible,” Kappler added.  “We’ve now hired more contact tracers and have a new system for case investigations and contact tracing. We are prioritizing outbreaks and certain populations, such as long-term care facilities and schools. With our new approach and new staff, we will have a strategic process for reaching everyone with the information they need.”

COVID testing and vaccine information and data available online

Garfield County Public Health is posting frequent updates in the news media, on Facebook @garfieldhealth, and on the county’s website at the COVID & Public Health page. To navigate to this information from the main Garfield County home page, click the red COVID & Public Health rectangle at the top of the page.

Sign up to be notified about Garfield County COVID news at garfieldcounty.net.

New guidance on timeframes and how to live with someone who is infected with COVID-19 virus

Roaring Fork Schools implement shortened quarantine period

Effective immediately, the Roaring Fork Schools will implement a shortened quarantine period for those exposed to a confirmed case of Covid. Students will now quarantine for 10 days, shortening the previous quarantine period by four days. Staff will now quarantine for 10 days without a negative Covid test or for seven days if they get a negative Covid test five to seven days after the exposure. 

This shortened quarantine comes from Garfield County Public Health, which revised its quarantine protocols to better align with the new guidelines issued by the CDC in December that shortened the recommended quarantine period. Although the Roaring Fork Schools have schools in Garfield, Eagle, and Pitkin Counties, going forward, the district will implement Garfield County Public Health’s quarantine protocols in all schools to ensure consistency and prevent confusion. The district remains committed partners with all three counties.

“We know that quarantines cause disruption for everyone in our schools. Our hope is that this shortened window will provide some relief,” said Superintendent Rob Stein. “But it’s still critical that everyone continue to do their part to keep Covid out of our schools to minimize quarantines as much as possible.”

Roaring Fork Schools implement shortened quarantine period

Free weekly COVID-19 community testing available for Parachute, Rifle and New Castle

COMMUNITY ADVISORY
1.8.21

Mobile vans will remain as long as there is demand for services

Garfield County, CO – Western Garfield free COVID testing is now available through a Curative mobile van location that will be available each week in Parachute, Rifle and New Castle, as long as there is community demand. Testing is at no cost, and does not require a doctor’s note, identification, or insurance.

“Testing began in January 2021 and will run in each location through March as long as participation numbers are there,” said Christine Singleton, curative testing coordinator with Garfield County Public Health. “We didn’t have much advance notice to get the word out that the van was coming back, but now it will be a weekly offering in these communities.”

The testing offered in early December had 88 participants in Parachute, 125 in Rifle, and 185 in New Castle. Testing the first week in January had 8 in Parachute, 33 in Rifle and 62 in New Castle.

“COVID numbers are still high, so I think that the lack of participation was more of an issue of people not knowing about the site being available. We know that it can be really difficult for some of our Parachute and Battlement Mesa residents to travel to other towns for services. We hope that people learn about the testing sites and use them as needed as it is a use it or loose it situation,” said Singleton.

While walk-ins are welcome, online pre-registration is highly encouraged. Register here:

Elk Creek Elementary School- Mobile Van
Sundays 9 a.m. – 3 p.m., January – March
804 W Main St., New Castle, 81647
https://curative.com/sites/17935/walkup#9/39.573/-107.5417

Bea Underwood Elementary School- Mobile Van
Mondays 9 a.m. – 11 a.m., January – March
0741 Tamarisk Trail, Parachute, 81635
https://curative.com/sites/17936/walkup#9/39.441/-108.0382

Garfield County Fairgrounds- Mobile Van
Mondays 12:30 – 4:30 p.m., January – March
1001 Railroad Ave., Rifle, 81650
https://curative.com/sites/17938/walkup#9/39.5401/-107.7851

Curative offers an oral-fluid swab testing — an alternative method to nasopharyngeal or brain swabs in testing for COVID-19 with the highest possible clinical sensitivity. It is an observed and directed, self-collected test, which minimizes the in-person contact and risk of transmission for all site visitors and testing professionals. Results are returned to patients within 48 hours upon receipt at the lab.

Anyone who has symptoms should get tested immediately and isolate for at least 10 days from onset until they are fever-free for 24 hours (without the help of medication), and their symptoms are improving. Anyone who has been exposed to someone with COVID-19 should get tested 5 to 7 days after exposure and quarantine.

Garfield County Public Health has a list of testing sites on the COVID-19 testing page. Symptoms include:

Fever or chills
Cough
Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
Fatigue
Muscle or body aches
Headache
New loss of taste or smell
Sore throat
Congestion or runny nose
Nausea or vomiting
Diarrhea

While testing is an important tool in the COVID-19 response, the state cautions that a negative test doesn’t mean it’s okay to meet in large gatherings or bypass other public health orders, like wearing masks. All Coloradans need to mask up, physically distance, interact only with members of their own households, wash hands and stay home while sick.

How can I stay up to date on Garfield County COVID testing, vaccine information and data?

Garfield County Public Health is posting frequent updates in the news media, on Facebook @garfieldhealth, and on our website on the COVID & Public Health page. To navigate to the COVID & Public Health page from the main Garfield County site, click the red COVID & Public Health rectangle at the top of the page. Sign up to be notified about Garfield County COVID news at garfieldcounty.net.

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Pruebas Comunitarias de COVID-19 gratuitas disponibles cada semana para Parachute, Rifle y New Castle

Los camiones móviles permanecerán mientras haya demanda de servicios

Condado de Garfield, CO – Pruebas gratuitas de COVID-19 en el Oeste del Condado de Garfield están disponible a través de una ubicación de camioneta móvil curativa que estará disponible cada semana en Parachute, Rifle y New Castle siempre que haya demanda de la comunidad. Las pruebas no tienen costo, no requieren una nota médica, identificación o seguro.

“Las pruebas comenzaron en Enero de 2021 y se realizarán en cada lugar hasta Marzo, siempre que haya números de participación”, dijo Christine Singleton, Coordinadora de pruebas curativas de Salud Pública del Condado de Garfield. “No tuvimos mucha anticipación para hacer correr la voz de que la camioneta regresaría, pero ahora será una oferta semanal en estas comunidades”.

Las pruebas ofrecidas a principios de Diciembre tuvieron 88 participantes en Parachute, 125 en Rifle y 185 en New Castle. Las pruebas de la primera semana de Enero tuvieron 8 en Paracaídas, 33 en Rifle y 62 en New Castle.

“Los números de Covid siguen siendo altos, así que creo que la falta de participación fue más un problema de que la gente no supiera que el sitio estaba disponible. Sabemos que puede ser realmente difícil para algunos de nuestros residentes de Parachute y Battlement Mesa viajar a otras ciudades para recibir servicios. Esperamos que la gente conozca los sitios de prueba y los utilice según sea necesario, ya que se trata de una situación de uso o pérdida ”, dijo Singleton.

Escuela Primaria Elk Creek – En el estacionamiento
Domingos de 9 a. M. A 3 p. M., De enero a marzo
804 W Main St., Castillo Nuevo, 81647
https://curative.com/sites/17935/walkup#9/39.573/-107.5417

Escuela Primaria Bea Underwood – En el estacionamiento
Lunes 9 am – 11 am, enero – marzo
0741 Tamarisk Trail, Paracaídas, 81635
https://curative.com/sites/17936/walkup#9/39.441/-108.0382

Recinto ferial del condado de Garfield: En el estacionamiento
Lunes 12:30 pm – 4:30 pm, enero – marzo
1001 Railroad Ave., rifle, 81650
https://curative.com/sites/17938/walkup#9/39.5401/-107.7851

Curative ofrece una prueba de frote de cotonete de fluidos orales, un método alternativo a los cotonetes nasofaríngeos o cerebrales en la prueba de COVID-19 con la mayor sensibilidad clínica posible. Es una prueba auto-recopilada, dirigida y observada, que minimiza el contacto en persona y el riesgo de transmisión para todos los visitantes del sitio y profesionales de pruebas. Los resultados se devuelven a los pacientes dentro de las 48 horas posteriores a su recepción en el laboratorio.

Cualquier persona que tenga síntomas debe hacerse la prueba de inmediato y aislarse durante al menos 10 días desde el inicio hasta que esté libre de fiebre durante 24 horas (sin la ayuda de medicamentos) y sus síntomas mejoren. Cualquier persona que haya estado expuesta a alguien con COVID-19 debe hacerse la prueba 7 días después de la exposición y cuarentena.

Salud Pública del Condado de Garfield tiene una lista de sitios de prueba en la página de pruebas COVID-19. Los síntomas incluyen:

Fiebre o escalofríos
Tos
Falta de aire o dificultad para respirar.
Fatiga
Dolores musculares o corporales
Dolor de cabeza
Nueva pérdida del gusto u olfato
Dolor de garganta
Congestión o secreción nasal.
Náuseas o vómitos
Diarrea

Si bien las pruebas son una herramienta importante en la respuesta de COVID-19, el estado advierte que una prueba negativa no significa que esté bien reunirse en grandes reuniones o pasar por alto otras órdenes de salud pública, como usar una máscara. Todos los habitantes de Colorado deben ocultarse, distanciarse físicamente, interactuar solo con los miembros de sus propios hogares y quedarse en casa mientras están enfermos.

¿Cómo puedo mantenerme actualizado sobre las pruebas de COVID del condado de Garfield, la información y los datos sobre vacunas?

Salud Pública del Condado de Garfield publica actualizaciones frecuentes en los medios de comunicación, en Facebook @garfieldhealth, y en nuestro website en la página de COVID & Public Health page. Para navegar a la página de COVID y salud pública desde el sitio principal del condado de Garfield, haga clic en el rectángulo rojo de COVID y salud pública en la parte superior de la página. Regístrese para recibir notificaciones sobre las noticias de COVID del condado de Garfield en garfieldcounty.net.

Free weekly COVID-19 community testing available for Parachute, Rifle and New Castle

CDPHE: The state sends guidance for Phase 1 vaccine providers

REMOTE, (Dec. 5, 2020): Today, the state sent a letter to Phase 1 vaccine providers with more guidance on when to administer vaccines according to the updated phases and to increase efficiency in administration. Updates to the vaccine distribution plan include an expansion of phase 1B to include adults 70 and older and certain frontline essential workers.

The state is dividing up vaccine responsibility as described below:

  • Local public health agencies should focus their efforts on prioritizing vaccination for any outstanding highest risk healthcare workers in phase 1A as well as moderate risk healthcare workers and first responders in phase 1B.
  • The staff and residents at long-term care facilities will be vaccinated by the federal government’s Pharmacy Partnership for Long-Term Care Program.
  • All other phase 1 providers, such as hospitals, health systems, pharmacies and safety net clinics, should focus on vaccinating persons 70 years of age and older.

The state will be working with these providers to make sure the public can get a vaccine when it’s their turn.

The letter also included anticipated timing for each phase: 

  • We anticipate finishing the majority of remaining phase 1A healthcare workers around January 15, 2021.
  • The current supply of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccine received by the state of Colorado from mid January to late February will be allocated to completing vaccinations for moderate risk healthcare workers, first responders and adults 70 and over.
  • Once providers finish vaccinating these groups, we will be ready to vaccinate frontline essential workers, including teachers and childcare, likely beginning end of February.

Providers should focus on vaccinating these critical populations while ensuring no dose goes to waste. If faced with a choice of wasting vaccine doses or vaccinating someone earlier, providers should choose to vaccinate someone earlier.

Continue to stay up to date by visiting covid19.colorado.gov/vaccine.

CDPHE: The state sends guidance for Phase 1 vaccine providers

State launches BinaxNOW rapid home test program for Colorado schools

State also offers school masks to reduce risk to teachers and students

REMOTE, (Jan. 6, 2020): As part of ongoing efforts to keep in-person learning as safe as possible, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment (CDPHE) has developed a new at-home COVID-19 testing program for teachers, staff, and selected students at participating schools. The program is intended to help prevent the spread of COVID-19 in schools by allowing symptomatic and exposed individuals to get tested quickly and easily. If teachers or students are symptomatic, they should stay home. The program is also designed to facilitate more regular testing, especially for teachers and staff who are frequently in close contact with others as part of their jobs.

Colorado is one of three states with early access to the home-use BinaxNOW program. CDPHE has contracted with a digital health provider, eMed, to provide BinaxNOW home test kits for use via a virtually guided telehealth session. At-home testing reduces the staffing, personal protective equipment (PPE), and reporting burden on school health officials and is more convenient for educators and students. Results are available within 15 minutes of collecting a nasal swab sample. Individuals age 15 and older may collect their own samples with assistance from the eMed proctor, while children age 4-14 may have samples collected by an adult.

Teachers, staff, and selected students at participating schools and their parents or guardians will be able to use a web portal to order tests, which will then be shipped directly to their home. Testing will be conducted via a telehealth remote proctor session and the proctor will report the results to local public health and CDPHE. Additionally, CDPHE will make kits available for school distribution.

CDPHE is working to make home BinaxNOW tests available through the end of this school year to all districts and private schools that opt into the program. Public school district leaders and leaders from charter, private, and parochial schools who are interested in participating should complete a short survey regarding their testing plans. Interested districts and independent schools should submit only one response each. This data is essential to the state’s planning strategies and will enable us to obtain and distribute resources as effectively and efficiently as possible. 

Additionally, the Colorado State Emergency Operations Center continues the distribution of masks for teachers at public, charter, and private schools through the end of the 2020-21 school year. To date, the state has distributed 2,440,750 KN95 masks to schools. Districts, Boards of Cooperative Educational Services (BOCES), charters, public schools, and facility schools will be given the opportunity to receive a combination of KN95 masks and surgical masks. Information on how districts can opt in will be coming soon from Colorado Department of Education. 

State launches BinaxNOW rapid home test program for Colorado schools